Course Descriptions

Agriculture (AEEC)

AEEC 1110: Introduction to Agricultural Economics and Business. (3) Orientation to agricultural economics and business through the discovery process for the consumer in the food, fiber and natural resource sectors of the global economy. The course will discuss the application of micro- and macro-economic principles as they relate to agricultural economics and business.

 

Africana Studies (AFST)

AFST 1110: Introduction to Africana Studies. (3) An interdisciplinary course that introduces students to the histories, cultures, and experiences of global people of African descent.

 

Anthropology (ANTH)

ANTH 1115: Introduction to Anthropology. (3) Anthropology is the systematic study of the humanity both past and present. The course introduces students to the four subfields of anthropology, which include archaeology, biological, linguistic and cultural anthropology. Students will learn about the concepts and methods that anthropologists use to study our species and gain a broader perspective on the human experience. Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area 4: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

ANTH 1211: Archaeological Method and Theory. (3) This class explores different ways of studying and interpreting the past through a survey of archaeology’s historical, theoretical, and methodological development. Co-requisite: ANTH 1211L.

ANTH 1211L: Archaeological Method and Theory Laboratory. (1) Accompanying lab class for ANTH1211. Co-requisite: ANTH 1211.

ANTH 1140: Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (3) This is an introductory course that provides an overview of cultural anthropology as a subfield within the broader discipline of anthropology and as a research approach within the social sciences more generally. The course presents core concepts and methods of cultural anthropology that are used to understand the ways in which human beings organize and experience their lives through distinctive cultural practices. More specifically, this course explores social and cultural differences and similarities around the world through a variety of topics such as: language and communication, economics, ways of making a living, marriage and family, kinship and descent, race, ethnicity, political organization, supernatural beliefs, sex and gender, and globalization. This course ultimately aims to present a broad range of perspectives and practices of various cultural groups from across the globe. Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area 4: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

ANTH 1155: Introduction to Linguistic Anthropology. (3) This is an introductory course, which provides an overview of the discipline of Linguistic Anthropology. The course will discuss the implications of language within anthropology, as well as within the sciences and social sciences more generally. The course explores the core concepts and methods of linguistic anthropology, such as the basic structure of language, first and second language acquisition, bilingualism, and social and regional variations that are used to help students understand what it means to be human and the role of language in human societies. Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area 4: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

ANTH 1170: Human Life Course. (3) Biology and behavior of the human life course, including the evolution of the life history patterns specific to humans and the impact of population growth and of adaptation to local conditions in promoting human diversity. Recommended, but not required, that this be taken concurrently with 1170L.

ANTH 1170L: Computer Laboratory in Human Evolutionary Ecology. (2) Introduces the computer as a tool in biological and social science research, provides first-hand experience in data collection, analysis and modeling behavior. No prior computer experience required. Recommended, but not required, that this be taken concurrently with 1170.

ANTH 1135: Introduction to Biological Anthropology. (3) Evolution over the last several million years has resulted in modern humans – Homo sapiens. Amazing things occurred during this lengthy process, resulting in us – big brained, handy, upright, and lightly hair-covered primates. In this class, we’ll track the phenomenal course of human development, beginning with our distant hominid ancestor Aridipithecus (more than 4 million years ago), through the various species of Australopithecus, Homo habilis, Home erectus, Neanderthals, and finally arriving at modern humans. During this class, we’ll learn what makes humans unique as a species and how closely related we are to our primate cousins. Recommended, but not required, that this be taken concurrently with 1135L.

ANTH 1135L: Introduction to Biological Anthropology Laboratory. (2) The factual basis of human evolution, from the comparative study of living and fossil primates to interpretation of recent human fossils. Recommended, but not required, that this be taken concurrently with 1135.

ANTH 2175: World Archaeology. (3) Archaeology is the systematic study of the human past through material remains. This course introduces students to the physical remains of past societies and compares and contrasts archaeological development in different regions. Students will explore the dynamics of the human past and its influences on contemporary society.  Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area 4: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

ANTH 2190C: Introduction to Forensic Anthropology. (3) This course will introduce you to the field of forensic anthropology, its main concepts, and their application in the broader medico legal system. This will include discussion of the structure of the medico legal system, the organizational hierarchy of death investigation, the role and ethical responsibilities of the forensic anthropologist, an introduction to the information that is provided by anthropological analysis and the methods used to obtain this information, the importance of the chain of evidence, the role of expert testimony, the importance of research, and the steps of designing effective research projects.

ANTH 2996: Topics in Anthropology. (3) May be repeated for credit, as long as content is different.


Architecture (ARCH)

ARCH 1115: Introduction to Architectural Graphics. (3) Introduction to manual and digital drawing as well as modeling techniques for architectural and interior design. Students will learn how to represent composition, form and space by orthographic drawing, paraline and perspective views, and freehand sketching. Three-dimensional model building techniques will also be introduced.

ARCH 1120: Introduction to Architecture. (3) This course provides students the tools and vocabulary to analyze, interpret and discuss the built environment from the social, historical, perceptual and technical determinants. Students are introduced to elements, principles, and theories of architecture through their social, historical, and technical determinants. The course seeks to lay a foundation in architectural studies, including introducing students to fundamental vocabulary and concepts.

ARCH 1125: Design Fundamentals. (3) Introduces fundamental principles and processes of two-, three-, and four-dimensional design. Design aesthetics, perception, technique, composition, evaluation of materials and methods, practicing design methodologies, exploring design principles and theories, and graphic authorship are explored through various types of assignments.


Art History (ARTH)

ARTH 1120: Introduction to Art. (3) In this class, students will be introduced to the nature, vocabulary, media and history of the visual arts, illustrated by examples drawn from many cultures, both Western and non-Western and across many centuries. We will begin with a general overview of the subject, including basic concepts and themes that shed light on the continuity of the artistic enterprise across the span of human experience. We will study the visual elements from which art is made, including how artists use these elements and how the artists' use of visual elements affects our experience of looking at art. We will examine both two-dimensional and three-dimensional media including drawing, painting, printmaking, camera and computer arts, graphic design, sculpture, installation, crafts and architecture. Selected works will be examined in context, including the history of the time and place in which they were created, as well as their function, patronage, and the character and intent of individual artists. Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area 7: Arts and Design.

ARTH 2110: History of Art I. (3) This survey course explores the art and architecture of ancient pre-historic cultures through the end of the fourteenth century. While focused primarily on the art of the Western civilizations, this course will also provide insights into the works of other major cultures in order to provide alternate views of art and history. Emphasis will be placed on the relationship of artworks to political, social, spiritual, intellectual, and cultural movements that affect and are affected by their creation and development. Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area 7: Arts and Design.

ARTH 2120: History of Art II. (3) This survey course will explore the architecture, sculpture, ceramics, paintings, drawings, and glass objects from the 14th century to the modern era. While focused primarily on the art of the Western civilizations, this course will also provide insights into the works of other major cultures in order to provide alternate views of art and history. Emphasis will be placed on the relationship of artworks to political, social, spiritual, intellectual, and cultural movements that affect and are affected by their creation and development. Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area 7: Arts and Design.

ARTH 2245: History of Photography. (3) This course is designed to provide students with a fundamental working knowledge of the major trends in the aesthetic, conceptual, and technical aspects of photography from its beginnings in the 1830s to the recent practices of photographers and artists working with photographic technologies. Together we will investigate photography’s role as an artistic medium as a central focus, as well as its broader role in our visual, political, and social culture. Textbook readings, online lectures, discussions boards, exams, and other activities will assist students in gaining a critical understanding of photography.

 

Art Studio (ARTS)

ARTS 1220: Arts Practices I. (3) This course introduces the exploration of processes, ideas, and diverse media of visual arts. It addresses the thematic concepts that are central to the nature of art making today, with emphasis given to issues of LIGHT, FRAME, and MARK while developing an understanding of the elements and principles of design. Suggested co-requisite: ARTH 1120.Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area 7: Arts and Design.

ARTS 1230: Arts Practices II. (3) This course introduces the exploration of processes, ideas, and diverse media of visual arts. It addresses the thematic concepts that are central to the nature of art making today, with emphasis given to issues of MOTIVE and CHANGE while developing concepts, techniques, and processes involved in working in the third dimension. Suggested co-requisite: ARTH 1120.Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area 7: Arts and Design.

ARTS 1310: Introduction to Ceramics. (3) This course introduces the technical processes and conceptual concerns of working with ceramic material. Various methods of forming functional and expressive works out of clay are explored. Methods used include handbuilding and throwing, basic clay bodies, slip and glaze, and atmospheric firing. Suggested co-requisites: ARTS 1610, ARTS 1230.Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area 7: Arts and Design.

ARTS 1320: Ceramics I. (3-6) An introduction to the medium of clay incorporating hand building and wheel throwing to introduce the student to both the sculptural and utilitarian uses of clay. The student will also be introduced to a variety of glazing and firing techniques. Prerequisites: ARTS 1230 and ARTS 1310. Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area 7: Arts and Design.

ARTS 1410: Introduction to Photography. (3) This course introduces the making of photographic images from a broad viewpoint to consider both as an art practice and as a cultural practice. The course covers technical information on camera use and functionality, composition and visual design, digital workflow and editing, professional functions of manipulating and enhancing images, and printing correctly and effectively. The historical aspects of photography are also covered. Suggested co-requisite: ARTS 1220. Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area 7: Arts and Design.

ARTS 1510: Introduction to Electronic Art. (3) This course will be an introduction to the computer as a medium and fine art tool. The course will explore the history, theory, and contemporary art issues associated with electronic art practice, as well as introduce students to the basic tools and associated technologies. This studio course will introduce simple electronics, software and ideas for working with sound, video, and the internet to create artwork. Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area 7: Arts and Design.

ARTS 1610: Drawing I. (3) This course introduces the basic principles, materials, and skills of observational drawing. Emphasis is placed on rendering a 3-D subject on a 2-D surface with visual accuracy. Other topics include historical and contemporary references as well as an investigation of linear perspective, line, value, shape, space & composition. Suggested co-requisite: ARTH 1120. Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area 7: Arts and Design.

ARTS 1630: Painting I. (3) This course introduces the tradition of painting as a medium for artistic expression. Students will investigate materials, tools, techniques, history and concepts of painting. Emphasis is placed on developing descriptive and perceptual skills, color theory, and composition. Prerequisites: ARTS 1610, ARTS 1220; suggested co- or prerequisite: ARTS 2610. Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area 7: Arts and Design.

ARTS 1710: Introduction to Printmaking. (3) This course provides direct experience of exploring basic printmaking processes, including relief, intaglio, and monoprint processes, as well as the investigation of materials/media, tools, techniques, history, and concepts of printmaking. Emphasis is given to solving problems through thematic development while producing a portfolio of prints. Prerequisites: ARTS 1610, ARTS 1220. Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area 7: Arts and Design.

ARTS 1830: Shop Foundation. (3) This course provides an introduction to the proper use of shop facilities with an emphasis on the safety procedures required for their proper use. The course will provide the student with a foundation of technical skills for use in the production of their work in subsequent classes.

ARTS 1840: Sculpture I. (3) This course introduces the student to a variety of medium and techniques used in the production of sculpture; along with the historic, conceptual, and esthetic foundations of the sculptural process. Prerequisite: ARTS 1230. Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area 7: Arts and Design.

ARTS 2420: Visualizing Ideas. (3) The course is dedicated to teaching how to visualize ideas within the photographic medium by combining theoretical content and aesthetic form to create a conceptually rich body of work. It explores advanced digital photography, including perfecting use of the camera and relevant digital software, and honing inkjet printing skills. We will explore new techniques and workflows, and use them to respond to a variety of themes and concerns. We will look at a number of contemporary photographic practitioners, and discuss a multitude of historical and contemporary approaches to the same ideas we will be probing.

ARTS 2522: Digital Imaging Techniques. (3) Techniques and aesthetics of digital imaging using a variety of software programs and hardware. Prerequisite: ARTS 1410. Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area 7: Arts and Design.

ARTS 2523: Video Art I. (3) An investigation of video as a medium within a fine art context. Course will explore history, theory, and contemporary art issues associated with video art practice as well as develop student's mastery of technical skills. Prerequisite: ARTS 1510. Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area 7: Arts and Design.

ARTS 2610: Drawing II. (3) This course introduces color and colored media as an element of composition while emphasizing descriptive and perceptual drawing skills and conceptual approaches to contemporary drawing. Prerequisites: ARTS 1610, ARTS 1220. Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area 7: Arts and Design.

ARTS 2630: Painting II. (3-6) This course focuses on the expressive and conceptual aspects of painting, building on the observational, compositional, technical, and critical skills gained previously. Students will investigate a variety of approaches to subject matter, materials, and creative processes through in-class projects, related out-of -class assignments, library research or museum/gallery attendance, written responses, and critiques. Prerequisite: ARTS 1630. Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area 7: Arts and Design.

ARTS 2892: Sound Art I. (3) An exploration of sound as a medium and fine art tool. Course will explore history, theory and contemporary art issues associated with sound art, as well as develop student's skills in sound editing/ recording technology. Prerequisite: ARTS 1510. Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area 7: Arts and Design.

ARTS 2996: Topics in Art Studio. (3-9) May be repeated for credit, as long as content is different. No more than 9 credits can be applied towards a degree.

 

Astronomy (ASTR)

ASTR 1115: Introduction to Astronomy. (3) This course surveys observations, theories, and methods of modern astronomy. The course is predominantly for non-science majors, aiming to provide a conceptual understanding of the universe and the basic physics that governs it. Due to the broad coverage of this course, the specific topics and concepts treated may vary. Commonly presented subjects include the general movements of the sky and history of astronomy, followed by an introduction to basic physics concepts like Newton’s and Kepler’s laws of motion. The course may also provide modern details and facts about celestial bodies in our solar system, as well as differentiation between them – Terrestrial and Jovian planets, exoplanets, the practical meaning of “dwarf planets”, asteroids, comets, and Kuiper Belt and Trans-Neptunian Objects. Beyond this we may study stars and galaxies, star clusters, nebulae, black holes, clusters of galaxies and dark matter. Finally, we may study cosmology -- the structure and history of the universe. Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences.

ASTR 1115L: Astronomy Laboratory. (1) Introduction to Astronomy Lab will include hands-on exercises that work to reinforce concepts covered in the lecture, and may include additional components that introduce students to the night sky. Pre or co-requisite: ASTR 1115. Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences.


Automotive Technology (AUTT)

AUTT 101: Introduction to Automotive Technology. (3) Designed to expose the student to the automotive industry, its tools, and its specific language. The student will receive an overview in the basic systems related to automotive technology, and appropriate safety measures.

AUTT 111: Automotive Testing and Diagnosis. (4) Intended to give the student a background in testing and diagnosis of electronic, electrical and fuel systems found in current automobiles.

AUTT 115: Brakes, Suspension, and Steering. (4) The study of modern brake theory including drum and disk-type brakes. Mechanical and hydraulic principles as they pertain to brakes will be covered.

AUTT 130: Electrical System Repair. (4) Electrical theory and diagnosis. Starting, charging, lighting, and related electrical systems in automotive applications will be studied.

AUTT 170: Heating and Air Conditioning (4) Basic heating and air conditioning of an automotive system.

AUTT 203: Automotive Engine Overhaul (4) Repair and overhaul procedure performed on a gas engine.

AUTT 213: Automotive Transmission Overhaul (4) Basic transmission and overhaul of an automotive system.

AUTT 230: Electrical System Overhaul. (3) To review basic electrical theory and learn the testing and overhaul procedures for electrical system components.

AUTT 295: Practicum in Auto Technology. (3-9) The student will work in a garage or training facility in the Valencia County area and at the same time will be attending the college during part of the day. (May be repeated in subsequent terms for a maximum of 9 cr.)

 

Biology (BIOL)

BIOL 1110: General Biology.(3) This course introduces nonscience majors to basic biological concepts including, but not limited to, the properties of life, biochemistry, cell biology, molecular biology, evolution, biodiversity, and ecology. Credit not allowed for both BIOL 1110 and BIOL 1140; not accepted toward Biology major. Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences.

BIOL 1110L: General Biology Laboratory. (1) This laboratory course for non-science majors compliments the concepts covered in the associated general biology lecture course. Students will learn quantitative skills involved in scientific measurement and data analysis. Students will also perform experiments related to topics such as biochemistry, cell structure and function, molecular biology, evolution, taxonomic classification and phylogeny, biodiversity, and ecology. Pre or co-requisite: BIOL 1110. Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences.

BIOL 1140: Biology for Health Sciences. (3) This introductory biology course for students interested in health science careers focuses on the concepts of chemistry, cell biology, metabolism, genetics, and regulation of gene expression. Credit not allowed for both BIOL 1140 and BIOL 1110; not accepted toward Biology major. Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences.

BIOL 1140L: Biology for Health Sciences Laboratory. (1) This course is a laboratory that complements the concepts learned in the theory course. Students will learn skills involved in scientific measurement, microscopy, and mathematical analysis. Students will also perform experiments and data analysis related to cell structure and function, chemistry, enzyme activity, and genetics. Pre or co-requisite: BIOL 1140. Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences.

BIOL 2110C: Principles of Biology: Cellular and Molecular Lecture and Laboratory. (4) This course introduces students to major topics in general biology and focuses on the principles of structure and function of living things at the molecular, cellular and organismic levels of organization. Major topics included are introduction to the scientific process, chemistry of cells, organization of cells, cellular respiration, photosynthesis, cell division, genetics, DNA replication, transcription, and translation. Prerequisite: CHEM 1215 and CHEM 1215L .

BIOL 2210: Human Anatomy and Physiology I. (3) This course is the first of two that serve as an introduction to human anatomy and physiology for biology majors and allied health students. The course entails describing, explaining, and analyzing structure and function from the submicroscopic to the organismal level with emphasis on anatomic, directional, and sectional terminology, basic cellular structure and metabolism, tissue differentiation and characteristics, and organ system structure and function; Specifically the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems. Lecture: 3 hours. Prerequisites: BIOL 1140/1140L or BIOL2110C and CHEM 1120L or CHEM 1215.

BIOL 2210L: Human Anatomy and Physiology Laboratory I. (3) This is the first in a series of two laboratory courses designed to introduce laboratory practices and techniques for human anatomy and physiology, from the basic cell structure through the organ system level ;specifically the integumentary, skeletal, muscle, and nervous systems. Lab: 3 hours. Pre or co-requisite: BIOL 2210.

BIOL 2225: Human Anatomy and Physiology II. (3) This course is the second of two that serve as an introduction to human anatomy and physiology for biology majors and allied health students. The course entails describing, explaining, and analyzing structure and function from the submicroscopic to the organismal level with emphasis on specific cellular, tissue, and organ structure and physiology, and organ system structure and function; specifically the endocrine, cardiovascular, respiratory, urinary, and reproductive systems. Additionally, an analysis of these concepts is included: fluid and electrolyte balance, pregnancy, growth and development from zygote to newborn, and heredity. Lecture: 3 hours. Prerequisites: BIOL 2210.

BIOL 2225L: Human Anatomy and Physiology Laboratory II. (3) This is the second in a series of two laboratory courses designed to introduce laboratory practices and techniques for human anatomy and physiology, from the basic cell structure through the organ system level; specifically the endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, urinary, and reproductive systems. Lab: 3 hours. Pre or co-requisite: BIOL 2225.

BIOL 2305: Microbiology for Health Sciences. (4) This course introduces the basic principles of microbial structure, genetics, and physiology, virology, parasitology, disease, pathogenicity, epidemiology and immunology. Only some emphasis is given to basic biological principles. The course is designed for those obtaining a career in the health sciences. Not accepted toward a biology major. Lecture: 3 hours; lab: 3 hours. Prerequisites: BIOL 1140/1140L or BIOL 2220C and CHEM 1120 or CHEM 1215/1215L.

BIOL 2410C: Principles of Biology: Genetics Lecture and Laboratory. (4) This course introduces the fundamental principles of heredity; DNA structure and replication; the processes of transcription, translation, and regulation of gene expression; and structural, functional, and comparative genomics. The course covers the application of major genetic concepts, principles, and techniques to understand and solve biological questions. Prerequisites: general chemistry I plus lab, Principles of Biology: Cell and Molecular Biology. Prerequisite: BIOL 2110C and CHEM 1215 or CHEM 1217. Prerequisite or Co-requisite: CHEM 1225 or CHEM 1227.

BIOL 2996: Topics in Biology. (1-4) Transferable to the UNM Biology Department as an elective. May be repeated for credit, as long as content is different.

 

Business (ACCT, BCIS, BFIN, BUSA, ENTR, MKTG)

ACCT 2110X and 2110Y: Principles of Accounting IA and IB. (3) The development of the accounting cycle, special journals, and financial statements.

BCIS 1110: Introduction to Information Systems. (3) Examination of information systems and their impact on commerce, education, and personal activities. Utilization of productivity tools for communications, data analysis, information management and decision-making. Prerequisite: MATH 1215, or MATH 1215X, MATH 1215Y, and MATH 1215Z or MATH 1170 and MATH 1215Z.

BFIN 2110: Intro to Finance. (3) Introduces tools and techniques of financial management. Includes time value of money; financial planning, diversification and risk; debt and equity investment decisions; and financial statement analysis.

BUSA 1110: Introduction to Business. (3) Fundamental concepts and terminology of business including areas such as management, marketing, accounting, economics, personnel, and finance; and the global environment in which they operate.

BUSA 1996: Topics. (3) Selected offering of topics not represented in the regular curriculum. May be repeated once.

BUSA 2220: Human Resource Management. (3) This course covers those topics which would be relevant to the role of human resource department in today’s firm. Topics include: human resource management, compensation and benefits, labor relations, E.E.O., affirmative action, employment and placement, training and development, and other related topics.

BUSA 2260: Principles of Strategy. (3) Case studies and projects that prepare the students to effectively apply their management training in the business environment will be emphasized. Project assignments in planning, decision making and problem solving will use and promote the development of capabilities in all functional area of management. Additionally, emphasizes the functions of top management. Case studies offer the student an opportunity to develop a habit of administrative thinking as company-wide objectives and policies are formulated and consistent plans and programs are carried into action.

ENTR 1110: Entrepreneurship. (3) Introduces students to the concept of entrepreneurship and to the process of business startups.

MKTG 2110: Principles of Marketing. (3) A complete overview of the system for assessing customer needs, allocation of scarce resources to fulfill those needs, transmittal of market related information, completion of exchange processes and profit maximization in free markets. Emphasis on interdisciplinary tools for management, decision-making and developing marketing strategies in domestic and international market applications.

 

Chemistry (CHEM)

CHEM 1105: Preparation for College Chemistry. (2) A preparatory course for students who feel they are not prepared or who do not have the prerequisite requirements for CHEM 1215. A grade of “CR” can be used as a placement into CHEM 121/123L. Offered on a CR/NC (credit/non-credit) basis only.

CHEM 1106: Foundations of Chemistry. (3) Chemistry 1106 is a unique preparatory course for Chemistry 1215 and subsequent chemistry courses. It has a dual purpose; firstly, to help you obtain a solid foundation in the chemical concepts that are essential to your future Chemistry and science classes, and secondly to optimize your set of learning skills to help you learn more efficiently, demonstrate your knowledge and succeed in your future fast-paced, high-level science courses.

CHEM 1110: Chemistry in Our Community. (3) This course will introduce non science majors to the basic chemistry required to understand topics of current interest affecting their communities, such as air and water quality, global climate change, use of fossil fuels, nuclear power, and alternative energy sources, to illustrate chemical principles, acquaint students with scientific methods, and to critically evaluate scientific claims as presented in the media and in other communicative forums. Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences.

CHEM 1120C: Introduction to Chemistry – non majors. (4) This course covers qualitative and quantitative areas of non-organic general chemistry for non-science majors and some health professions. Students will learn and apply principles pertaining, but not limited to, atomic and molecular structure, the periodic table, acids and bases, mass relationships, and solutions. The laboratory component introduces students to techniques for obtaining and analyzing experimental observations pertaining to chemistry using diverse methods and equipment. Prerequisite: ACT =>22 or SAT =>510 or MATH 1215 or MATH 1220 or MATH 1240 or MATH 1430 or MATH 1440 or MATH 1510 or MATH 1520 or MATH 2530. Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences.

CHEM 1215: General Chemistry I. (3) This course is intended to serve as an introduction to General Chemistry for students enrolled in science, engineering, and certain pre-professional-programs. Students will be introduced to several fundamental concepts, including mole, concentration, heat, atomic and molecular structure, periodicity, bonding, physical states, stoichiometry, and reactions.  Lecture: 3 hours. Credit not allowed for both CHEM 1120 and CHEM 1215. Prerequisite: MATH 1220 or MATH 1230 or MATH 1240 or MATH 1430 or MATH 1440 or MATH 1510 or MATH 1520 or MATH 2530 or with a grade of C or higher or a math placement score that qualifies the student. Co-requisite: CHEM 1215L. Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences.

CHEM 1215L: General Chemistry I Laboratory. (1) General Chemistry I Laboratory for Science Majors is the first semester laboratory course designed to complement the theory and concepts presented in General Chemistry I lecture. The laboratory component will introduce students to techniques for obtaining and analyzing experimental observations pertaining to chemistry using diverse methods and equipment. Lab: 3 hours. Prerequisite: MATH 1220 or MATH 1230 or MATH 1240 or MATH 1430 or MATH 1440 or MATH 1510 or MATH 1520 or MATH 2530. Co-requisite: CHEM 1215. Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences.

CHEM 1225: General Chemistry II. (3) This course is intended to serve as a continuation of general chemistry principles for students enrolled in science, engineering, and certain pre-professional programs. The course includes, but is not limited to a theoretical and quantitative coverage of solutions and their properties, kinetics, chemical equilibrium, acids and bases, entropy and free energy, electrochemistry, and nuclear chemistry. Additional topics may include (as time permits) organic, polymer, atmospheric, and biochemistry. Lecture: 3 hours. Co-requisite: CHEM 1225L. Prerequisite: CHEM 1215 and CHEM 1215L; ACT =>25 or SAT =>570 or MATH 1220 or MATH 1230 or MATH 1240 or MATH 1430 or MATH 1440 or MATH 1510 or MATH 1520 or MATH 2530  Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences.

CHEM 1225L: General Chemistry II Laboratory. (1) General Chemistry II Laboratory for Science Majors is the second of a two semester sequence of laboratory courses designed to complement the theory and concepts presented in General Chemistry II lecture. The laboratory component will introduce students to techniques for obtaining and analyzing experimental observations pertaining to chemistry using diverse methods and equipment. Lab: 3 hours. Prerequisite: ACT Math =>25 or SAT Math =>570 or MATH 1220 or MATH 1230 or MATH 1240 or MATH 1430 or MATH 1440 or MATH 1510 or MATH 1520 or MATH 2530 or CHEM 1215 and CHEM 1215L. Co-requisite: CHEM 1225.Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences.

CHEM 2120: Integrated Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry. (4) This course is a one-semester introduction to Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry designed for students in health and environmental occupations. The course surveys organic compounds in terms of structure, physical, and chemical properties, followed by coverage of the chemistry of specific classes of organic compounds in the biological environment. Students will apply course concepts to everyday organic and biological chemistry problems in preparation for careers in health and environmental fields. Prerequisite: CHEM 1120C or CHEM 1225.

 

Communication (COMM)

COMM 1115: Communication. (3) This survey course introduces the principles of communication in the areas of interpersonal, intercultural, small group, organizational, public speaking, and mass and social media.

COMM 1130: Public Speaking. (3) This course introduces the theory and fundamental principles of public speaking, emphasizing audience analysis, reasoning, the use of evidence, and effective delivery. Students will study principles of communication theory and rhetoric and apply them in the analysis, preparation and presentation of speeches, including informative, persuasive, and impromptu speeches. Suggested prerequisite: ENGL 1110. Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area 1: Writing and Speaking.

COMM 1140: Introduction to Media Writing. (3) This course combines a theoretical foundation with practical applications. It provides an introduction to journalism, as well as an overview of the most common types of writing required in public relations, advertising and strategic communication. Prerequisites: 15 credit hours earned, 2.0 minimum GPA, ENGL 1120.

COMM 1150: Introduction to Mass Communication. (3). This course introduces students to the history, models, theories, concepts, and terminology of mass communication, focusing on various media and professions. The course will enable students to develop media literacy skills to interpret mass communication and understand the effects of media on society and their lives. Suggested prerequisite: ENGL 1110.

COMM 1155: Communication Across Cultures. (3) An introduction to communication among people from different cultural backgrounds, emphasizing intercultural relations. This course seeks to identify, honor and enhance the strengths of different cultural perspectives. Suggested prerequisite: ENGL 100.

COMM 2120: Interpersonal Communication. (3) This course provides an introduction to the study of interpersonal communication. Students will examine the application of interpersonal communication in personal and professional relationships. Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area 1: Writing and Speaking.

COMM 2140: Small Group Communication. (3) Explores the principles and practices of effective participation in small groups, with emphasis on critical thinking, problem solving, organizational skills, role theory, conflict resolution, and creative decision-making methods. It combines a theoretical foundation with practical application to help students better understand the dynamics of group communication in both professional and social contexts. Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area 1: Writing and Speaking.

COMM 2150: Communication for Teachers. (3) This course will investigate and critically evaluation the influence of identity, communication, and culture on instruction, learning, engagement, classroom community, and the teacher-student relationship.

 

Computer-Aided Drafting (CADT)

CADT 150: Introduction to Computer Aided Drafting. (3) This course is designed for students interested in developing computer-aided drafting skills. It consists of both lecture and system operation assignments. Lecture/lab. Prerequisite: Approval of the instructor.

CADT 160: Introduction to AutoDesk Revit. (4) An introductory course to building information modeling. The basic features of Autodesk’s REVIT software will be covered. Lecture/lab.

CADT 171: Computer Modeling for 3D Printing.  (4). The purpose of this course is to introduce students to 3D printing software. Students will learn how to make 3D models using Sketchup, Autodesk’s 123D Design and AutoCad. The 3D models will be converted to build files and printed using the lab 3D printers. Lecture/lab. Prerequisite: CADT 150.

CADT 180: 3D Studio I. (4) Introductory course in 3D modeling, rendering and animation. Lecture/lab. Prerequisite: BCIS 1110 or permission of instructor.

CADT 185: Architectural Drafting. (4) An introductory architectural drafting course covering basic drafting skills and conventions.

CADT 191: Introduction to 3D Printing. (4) The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the current state of 3D printing technology. Students will learn about the cross-disciplinary nature of 3D printing as an accessible, cost-effective and green prototyping and manufacturing solution. The course is taught in a lecture/lab format using two different 3D printers and related software. Lecture/lab. Prerequisite: CADT 150.

CADT 195: Introduction to Technical Drafting. (4) Includes basic drafting skills, geometric construction, multi-view projection and dimensioning.

CADT 255: Introduction to Architectural Modeling. (4) Students will use design software to create 3D models of buildings, generate floor plans and other working drawings, create a “walk through,” and generate construction estimates. This class can be used for elective credit in the CAD certificate and degree programs. Lecture/Lab. Prerequisite: IT 101 or equivalent computer literacy.

CADT 260: Intermediate Computer-Aided Drafting. (4) This course covers discipline, specific environment, and data input/export. Lecture/Lab. Prerequisite: CADT 150.

CADT 270: Advanced Computer-Aided Drafting. (4) Course in advanced CAD techniques, including macro programming and production drafting. Prerequisites: CADT 260.

CADT 293: Topics in CADT. (1-4)

CADT 294: 3D Printing Project. (4) This is the capstone course for the 3D Printing Certificate. CADT 294 is an independent study course for students with existing modeling and 3D printing skills. Students are required to log eight hours per week (two of the eight hours must be completed in the CAD lab). The 3D printing project(s) and project milestones are chosen in consultation with the instructor. Lecture/lab. Prerequisites: CADT 191and CADT 171.

CADT 295: Practicum/Cooperative Education. (1-4) Students are placed in a business in order to gain on-the-job skills and knowledge. Prerequisite: approval of the instructor; enrolled in the last semester of their associate degree or certificate program.

 

Computer Science (CS)

CS 105L: Introduction to Computer Programming. (3) Introduction to Computer Programming is a gentle and fun introduction. Students will use a modern Integrated Development Environment to author small programs in a high level language that do interesting things.

CS 108L: Computer Science for All: An Introduction to Computational Science and Modeling. (3) This course offers an introduction to computer science through modeling and simulation. Students will learn agent-based modeling of complex systems and see the applicability of computer science across fields. Course cannot apply to major in computer science or any other SOE major.

CS 152L: Computer Programming Fundamental for Computer Science Majors. (3) Also offered as MATH 151L An introduction to the art of computing. Intended for Computer Science majors or minors. The objective of the course is an understanding of the relationship between computing and problem solving. Lecture: 3 hours, recitation: 1 hour.  Prerequisite: CS 105L, CS 108L, CS 151L, or ECE 131L.

CS 251L: Intermediate Programming. (3) An introduction to the methods underlying modern program development. Specific topics will include object-oriented design and the development of graphical user interfaces. Programming assignments will emphasize the use of objects implemented in standard libraries. Lecture: 3 hours, recitation: 1 hour. Prerequisite: Grade of B- or higher in CS 152L.

CS 261: Mathematical Foundations of Computer Science. (3) Introduction to the formal mathematical concepts of computer science for the beginning student. Topics include elementary logic, induction, algorithmic processes, graph theory, and models of computation. Prerequisite: Grade of A- or higher in MATH 1240 or grade of B- or higher in MATH 1215. Successful completion of PHIL 1120 is strongly suggested.

CS 293: Social and Ethical Issues in Computing. (1) Overview of philosophical ethics, privacy and databases, intellectual property, computer security, computer crime, safety and reliability, professional responsibility and codes, electronic communities, the internet, and the social impact of computers. Students make oral presentations and produce written reports.

 

Construction Technology (CNST)

CNST 104: Required Introduction to the National Center for Construction Education and Research for Certification. (4) Topics studied include basic math, communications prints, methods, and ethics. Students demonstrate skills level through laboratory assignments.

CNST 120: Principles of Electricity. (3) This course focuses on practical applications of electrical principles. The working principles and proper use of various types of electric motors are covered using circuit board calculations according to formulas of electrical functions.

 

CNST 122: Commercial Wiring. (3) This course covers commercial electrical wiring using New Mexico State Codes and the National Electric Code. Wiring problems in business and manufacturing locations and lighting, motor controls, appliance circuits, and other electrical projects are studied.

CNST 123: Automation and Robotics Manufacturing I. (3) This course introduces the basic theory, operation, and programming of automated manufacturing systems. The course will focus on three main types of manufacturing automation: Programmable Logic Controllers (PLC), Computer Numerically Controlled Machines (CNC), and Robotics. Prerequisite: CNST 120.

CNST 128: Motor and Motor Controls. (3) This course introduces common types of electric motors and includes motor theory, magnetism and motor rotation, motor starting components, and protective devices. Heat dissipation, motor slippage, wiring, speeds, and capacitors in motor circuits are included. Prerequisite: CNST 120.

CNST 129: Electrical Circuits. (3) This course provides a general understanding of common electric motors (from small shaded pole fans to large three-phase and direct currents) and motor operation and circuits using alternating current (single and three-phase). Pre or co-requisite: CNST 128.

CNST 204: Timber Framing. (4) Plan reading, elementary construction techniques, materials and construction documents; primary emphasis is on the current building code plan checking. Prerequisite: CNST 104.

CNST 205: Programmable Controllers I. (3) This course introduces the basic theory, operation, and programming of programmable logic controllers (PLC). Students will demonstrate programming examples, set-up examples and troubleshoot, as well as study PLC timing, counting, arithmetic, logic, and sequences. Prerequisite: CNST 120.

CNST 293: Topics in Construction Technology. (3-6) This course of study provides a basic introduction to construction skills for all crafts. Topics include basic safety in the construction setting, an introduction to construction mathematics, introduction to blue-prints, effective use of hand and power tools, and basic rigging.

 

Criminal Justice (CJUS)

CJUS 1110: Introduction to Criminal Justice. (3) This course provides an overall exploration of the historical development and structure of the United States criminal justice system, with emphasis on how the varied components of the justice system intertwine to protect and preserve individual rights. The course covers critical analysis of criminal justice processes and the ethical, legal, and political factors affecting the exercise of discretion by criminal justice professionals.

CJUS 1120: Criminal Law. (3) This course covers basic principles of substantive criminal law including elements of crimes against persons, property, public order, public morality, defenses to crimes, and parties to crime.

CJUS 1170: Introduction to Criminology. (3) The course will explore the crime problem, its context, and especially to explain causes of crime. The course will cover Foundations for Criminology, Theories of Crime, and Types of Crime.

CJUS 1190: Introduction to Protective Services. (3) A survey in concepts, principles, leadership, and practices of local law enforcement. The course is designed to prepare students for entry into local protective services and examines the structure, purpose, scope of authority, and jurisdictions of local law enforcement agencies. Students learn how protective services interact with local communities and agencies in local, state, tribal, and federal venues. In addition, the course reviews candidate characteristics, qualifications, and requirements for career opportunities in the protective services arena. A local background check is required. Students must be 18 years of age at the start of course. Permission required

CJUS 1350: Self Defense for Law Enforcement. (3) Instructs students entering the Law Enforcement profession in a comprehensive self-defense program designed to meet the New Mexico Law Enforcement Academy for basic police officer training.

CJUS 1360: Foundations of Professional Investigation. (3) An introduction to the investigative profession, including how professional investigators assist attorneys, businesses, and the public with a variety of cases. Students study the investigative process and conduct, the skills and traits required of professional investigators as well as the methodology that investigators use in both civil and criminal cases.

CJUS 1410: Law. (3) An introduction to persons seeking a career in the law enforcement profession with an understanding of criminal law and how it represents the power of government to prevent and punish socially harmful behavior. This course also examines the extent and limits of established rules of procedure in applying the rule of law.

CJUS 2110: Professional Responsibility in Criminal Justice. (3) This course covers the application of various ethical systems to decision making in criminal justice professions. This includes discussion of misconduct by criminal justice professionals and strategies to prevent misconduct. Well-known philosophers will be discussed and incorporated into the course material.

CJUS 2130: Police and Society. (3) The course presents a focused practical introduction to the key principles and practices of policing. Topics covered include issues of law enforcement fragmentation and jurisdiction, philosophies of policing, enforcement discretion, deployment strategies, use of force, personnel selection, socialization, tactics, and stress.

CJUS 2140: Criminal Investigations. (3) This course introduces criminal investigations within the various local, state, and federal law enforcement agencies. Emphasis is given to the theory, techniques, aids, technology, collection, and preservation procedures, which insure the evidentiary integrity. Courtroom evidentiary procedures and techniques will be introduced.

CJUS 2160: Field Experience in Criminal Justice. (3) This course is designed to provide actual experience working for a criminal justice agency and the opportunity to apply criminal justice concepts and theory to a field situation. Students already working in an agency will complete an approved learning project while on the job.

CJUS 2225: Introduction to Corrections. (3) This class will be a basic introduction to the corrections system in the United States, to include the process of an offender in the system and the responsibilities and duties of guards.

CJUS 2235: Constitutional Criminal Procedure. (3) This course is an examination of the constitutional principles related to the investigation of crimes, arrests, confessions and pre-trial processing of offenders. The focus will be on individual rights found in the First, Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, Eighth and Fourteenth Amendments of the United States Constitution and the comparable provisions of the New Mexico Constitution.

CJUS 2255: Rules of Criminal Evidence. (3) This course covers the application of the Federal Rules of Evidence and the New Mexico Rules of Evidence in a criminal case from investigation through sentencing.

CJUS 2330: Juvenile Corrections. (3) This course covers juvenile probation, detention, training schools and juvenile parole. This course will require students to work in teams that will design programs and facilities for juvenile corrections. Designs will be evaluated for their practical value and compliance with ACA standards.

CJUS 2410: Probation, Parole, and Community Corrections. (3) This course is a survey and analysis of probation, parole, other community reintegration procedures, halfway houses, community treatment centers, volunteer programs and graduated release. Special emphasis is placed upon the function, possibilities, and problems of community-based programs.

CJUS 2440: Police and Patrol Procedures. (3) This course covers the role and functions of police officers, including the basic tasks of preventing crime, enforcing the laws, protecting the innocent, and providing services while utilizing various patrol techniques. In addition, the course will discuss officer safety, use of force and the law enforcement code of ethics.

CJUS 2460: Traffic. (3) Encompasses a portion of the police officer training standards mandated by the New Mexico Law Enforcement Academy for police officer training. It provides the student with the knowledge and skills necessary to recognize and properly enforce traffic laws.

CJUS 2998: Internship. (3) Internship in Criminal Justice.

 

Digital Media Arts (DMA)

DMA 120: Introduction to Television Production. (4) This course will provide students with an introduction to producing programming for television broadcast. Students will learn basic shooting, editing and broadcast live and recorded media. Work is performed on location and in the studio.

DMA 145: Documentary Film Production. (4) Documentary Film Production is a comprehensive introduction to the basics of documentary film production. Students will make two short documentaries. Prerequisites: DMA 120 and DMA 125.

DMA 140: Commercial Production. (4) Commercial Production is a comprehensive introduction to the basics of commercial production. Students will make a commercial for a local business. Prerequisites: DMA 120 and DMA 125.

DMA 125: Introduction to Post-Production Editing. (4) This is a comprehensive introduction to the basics of editing short films, documentaries, and commercials.

DMA 155: Co-op Feature Film Production. (4) Co-Op Feature Film Production extends the opportunity to work on a UNM Produced Film in a variety of capacities that include grip work, production assistants, script supervisors, and editors. Students will work closely with each other and the director to successfully shoot a feature film. Prerequisites: DMA 120 and DMA 125.

DMA 135: Short Film Production. (4) Short Film Production is a comprehensive course in short film production. Students will prepare for preproduction, write, cast, rehearse, shoot, and edit their own short film throughout the course. Students will demonstrate their understanding of short film production. Prerequisites: DMA 120 and DMA 125.

DMA 150: Film Crew Internship. (4) Students will work on set for a television or film production company getting hands-on experience in the field. Students are required to keep a daily production journal. Prerequisites: DMA 120 and DMA 125.

DMA 210: Blogging as a Tool. (3) This course is designed to provide students with a fundamental working knowledge of the technical, aesthetic, and conceptual aspects of blogging and how to join the media outlets in our Web 2.0 bubble to further career and education. Students will investigate many aspects of blogging using various tools and software, including WordPress, Tumblr, and others. These tools will be the platforms for further discussing various topics of interest -education in a social media world, the state of the digital communication networks, social networking, RSS feeds, social bookmarking, photo sharing, video sharing, security and, most notably, how to contribute your own content freely yet cautiously. Lectures, demonstrations, online discussions in class and blog postings and participation will introduce various issues associated with the tools, media, and their content. Assigned projects and other online activities will assist in grasping a critical view of our online universe, better preparing the student for further study in higher education and beyond.

DMA 220: Social Media Marketing Tools. (3) In today's rapidly-evolving media landscape, social media has not only become a fundamental tool for communication, but a must-have skill in a multitude of industries. With the right amount of practice and social media education, students and professionals are empowered with a competitive edge in their studies, careers and communications.

DMA 293: Topics in Digital Media Arts. (1-4) May be repeated for credit as long as the topic is different.

DMA 270: Capstone: Portfolio-Practicum. (3) This course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to concentrate on a specific portfolio project. Students will develop a portfolio helpful for an entry-level position in digital media. This course should be taken in the final semester. Prerequisite: Instructor approval.


Early Childhood Education (ECED), formerly Early Childhood Multicultural Education (ECME)

ECED 1110: Child Growth, Development and Learning. (3) This basic course in the growth, development, and learning of young children, prenatal through age eight, provides students with the foundation for becoming competent early childhood professionals and knowledge of how young children grow, develop and learn. Major theories of child development are integrated with all aspects of development, including biological-physical, social, cultural, emotional, cognitive, and language domains. The adult’s role in supporting each child’s growth, development and learning will be emphasized.

ECED 1115: Health, Safety and Nutrition. (2) This course provides information related to standards and practices that promote children’s physical and mental well-being, sound nutritional practices, and maintenance of safe learning environments. It includes information for developing sound health and safety management procedures for indoor and outdoor learning environments for young children. The course examines the many scheduling factors that are important for children’s total development, healthy nutrition, physical activity, and rest.

ECED 1120: Guiding Young Children. (3) This course explores various theories of child guidance and the practical application of each. It provides developmentally appropriate methods for guiding children and effective strategies and suggestions for facilitating positive social interactions. Strategies for preventing challenging behaviors through the use of environment, routines and schedule will be presented. Emphasis is placed on helping children become self- responsible, competent, independent, and cooperative learners and including families as part of the guidance approach.

ECED 1125: Assessment of Children and Evaluation of Programs (3) This basic course familiarizes students with a variety of culturally appropriate assessment methods and instruments, including systematic observation of typically and non-typically developing children. The course addresses the development and use of formative and summative program evaluation to ensure comprehensive quality of the total environment for children, families, and the community. Students will develop skills for evaluating the assessment process and involving other teachers, professionals and families in the process.

ECED 1130: Family and Community Collaboration (3) This beginning course examines the involvement of families and communities from diverse cultural and linguistic backgrounds in early childhood programs. Ways to establish collaborative relationships with families in early childhood settings are discussed. Families’ goals and desires for their children will be supported through culturally responsive strategies.

ECED 2110: Professionalism. (2) This course provides a broad-based orientation to the field of early care and education. Early childhood history, philosophy, ethics and advocacy are introduced. Basic principles of early childhood systems are explored. Multiple perspectives on early care and education are introduced. Professional responsibilities such as cultural responsiveness and reflective practice are examined.

ECED 2115: Introduction to Reading and Literacy Development. (3) This course is designed to prepare early childhood professionals for promoting children’s emergent literacy and reading development. Through a developmental approach, the course addresses ways in which early childhood professionals can foster young children’s oral language development, phonemic awareness, and literacy problem solving skills, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension. This course provides the foundation for early childhood professionals to become knowledgeable about literacy development in young children. Instructional approaches and theory- and research-based strategies to support the emergent literacy and reading skills of native speakers and English language learners will be presented.

ECED 2120: Curriculum Development through Play – Birth through Age 4 (Pre-K). (3) This beginning curriculum course places play at the center of curriculum in developmentally-appropriate early childhood programs. It addresses content that is relevant for children birth through age four in developmentally and culturally sensitive ways of integrating content into teaching and learning experiences. Information on adapting content areas to meet the needs of children with special needs and the development of IFSPs is included. Curriculum development in all areas, including literacy, numeracy, the arts, health, science, social skills, and adaptive learning for children, birth through age four, is emphasized. Co-requisite: ECED 2121. Prerequisite: ECED 1110.

ECED 2121: Practicum for Curriculum Development through Play – Birth through Age 4 (Pre-K). (2) The beginning practicum course is a co-requisite with the course Curriculum Development through Play –Birth through Age 4. The field-based component of this course will provide experiences that address curriculum content that is relevant for children birth through age four in developmentally and culturally sensitive ways of integrating content into teaching and learning experiences. Information on adapting content areas to meet the needs of children with special needs and the development of IFSPs is included. Curriculum development in all areas, including literacy, numeracy, the arts, health, science, social skills, and adaptive learning for children, birth through age four, is emphasized. Co-requisite: ECED 2120. Prerequisite: ECED 1110.

ECED 2130: Curriculum Development – Age 3 (Pre-K) through Grade 3. (3) The curriculum course focuses on developmentally appropriate curriculum content in early childhood programs, age 3 through third grade. Development and implementation of curriculum in all content areas, including literacy, numeracy, the arts, health and emotional wellness, science, motor and social skills, is emphasized. Information on adapting content areas to meet the needs of children with special needs and the development of IEP’s is included. Co-requisite: ECED 2131. Prerequisite: ECED 1110.

ECED 2131: Practicum for Curriculum Development – Age 3 (Pre-K) through Grade 3. (2) The beginning practicum course is a co-requisite with the course Curriculum Development and Implementation: Age 3 through Grade 3. The field based component of this course will provide experiences that address developmentally appropriate curriculum content in early childhood programs, age 3 through third grade. Development and implementation of curriculum in all content areas, including literacy, numeracy, the arts, health and emotional wellness, science, motor and social skills is emphasized. Information on adapting content areas to meet the needs of children with special needs and the development of IEPs is included. Co-requisite: ECED 2130. Prerequisite: ECED 1110.

 

Economics (ECON)

ECON 2110: Macroeconomics. (3) Macroeconomics is the study of national and global economies. Topics include output, unemployment and inflation; and how they are affected by financial systems, fiscal and monetary policies. Suggested prerequisites: ENGL 1110 and MATH 120. Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area 4: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

ECON 2120: Microeconomics. (3) This course will provide a broad overview of microeconomics. Microeconomics is the study of issues specific to households, firms, or industries with an emphasis on the role of markets. Topics discussed will include household and firm behavior, demand and supply, government intervention, market structures, and the efficient allocation of resources. Suggested prerequisites: ENGL 1110, MATH 1215, and ECON 2110. Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area 4: Social and Behavioral Sciences.


Education (EDUC)

EDUC 1120: Introduction to Education. (3) Introduction to the historical, philosophical, sociological foundations of education, current trends, and issues in education; especially as it relates to a multicultural environment. Students will use those foundations to develop effective strategies related to problems, issues and responsibilities in the field of education. A field component at an educational site is required.

EDUC 1125: Introduction to Education in New Mexico. (3) An exploration of contemporary issues around diversity, culture, and education in New Mexico. The course is of special interest to students considering a teaching career. Projects in schools and/or community sites are part of requirements.

EDUC 1996: Topics in Education. (1-3) May be repeated for credit, as long as content is different.

EDUC 2375: Technology Integration in the Classroom. (1) Students apply knowledge of learning theory to explore how to incorporate educational technology as a classroom tool in the K-12 learning environment. Students will use classroom technology to enhance curriculum development and application to the classroom. Examines the impact of technology on the changing role of the teacher.

 

Emergency Medical Services (EMS)

EMS 106: Emergency Medical Responder. (4) A 60-hour course designed specifically for personnel who are first at the scene of an accident or emergency. This course offers a foundation for advanced EMS courses. During the first two weeks of class, students must have completed the following requirements: American Heart Association Healthcare Provider CPR Certification; 10 panel illegal drug screening; caregiver background screening and finger printing ($73.30 fee); immunizations to include Measles-Mumps-Rubella (MMR), Varicella (chicken pox), Hepatitis B series, Diphtheria-Pertussis-Tetanus (DPT), adult Tetanus, and Influenza (flu shot); Tuberculosis exam (TB). Additional requirements for EMS classes.

EMS 111: EMS Combination Refresher. (1) A 24-hour required course for EMT-First Responders, Basics, and Intermediates to maintain state and National Registry licensure that reviews current treatment in pre-hospital emergency patient care and updates the student in any changes to the New Mexico Scope of Practice for EMT’s. Student must have a current EMT License to take this course.

EMS 113: EMT-Basic. (8) This EMS certification level is the foundation level for all emergency medical responders. This course consists of 96 hours of didactic instruction and 80 hours of lab instruction, including individual instruction for a range of basic skills. Upon successful completion of the course, students will be eligible to sit for the National Registry EMT licensing examination. Corequisite: 142. Restriction: program permission. During the first two weeks of class, students must have completed the following requirements: American Heart Association Healthcare Provider CPR Certification; 10 panel illegal drug screening; caregiver background screening and finger printing ($73.30 fee); immunizations to include Measles-Mumps-Rubella (MMR), Varicella (chicken pox), Hepatitis B series, Diphtheria-Pertussis-Tetanus (DPT), adult Tetanus, and Influenza (flu shot); Tuberculosis exam (TB). Additional requirements for EMS classes.  A UNM Certificate is awarded upon successful completion of this course.

EMS 120: Introduction to EMS System. (3) Covers the history of emergency medical services and the development of EMS systems and current trends and issues in EMS. Ideal for students considering a career in EMS. Available online.

EMS 142: EMT-Basic Lab. (2) Meets the EMT Basic national standard curriculum requirements and incorporates NM EMT-B scope of practice. Provides lab instruction to prepare the student to sit for the NM and National Registry testing. Co–requisite EMS 113. Restriction: program permission. During the first two weeks of class, students must have completed the following requirements: American Heart Association Healthcare Provider CPR Certification; 10 panel illegal drug screening; caregiver background screening and finger printing ($73.30 fee); immunizations to include Measles-Mumps-Rubella (MMR), Varicella (chicken pox), Hepatitis B series, Diphtheria-Pertussis-Tetanus (DPT), adult Tetanus, and Influenza (flu shot); Tuberculosis exam (TB). Additional requirements for EMS classes.

EMS 143: EMT- Intermediate Lab. (1) Meets New Mexico requirements for EMT-Intermediate skills training, including intravenous fluid administration and pharmacology. Provides lab instruction to prepare the student to sit for the NM and National Registry testing. Prerequisite EMS 113 and EMS 142. Co-requisite: EMS 151 and EMS 180 Restriction: program permission.During the first two weeks of class, students must have completed the following requirements: American Heart Association Healthcare Provider CPR Certification; 10 panel illegal drug screening; caregiver background screening and finger printing ($73.30 fee); immunizations to include Measles-Mumps-Rubella (MMR), Varicella (chicken pox), Hepatitis B series, Diphtheria-Pertussis-Tetanus (DPT), adult Tetanus, and Influenza (flu shot); Tuberculosis exam (TB). Additional requirements for EMS classes.

EMS 151: EMT-Intermediate Clinical and Field Experience. (2) Meets New Mexico requirements for EMT-Intermediate field and clinical training, including emergency department and pre-hospital experience. Prerequisite: EMS 113 and EMS 142. Co-requisite: EMS 143 and EMS 180 Restriction: program permission. During the first two weeks of class, students must have completed the following requirements: American Heart Association Healthcare Provider CPR Certification; 10 panel illegal drug screening; caregiver background screening and finger printing ($73.30 fee); immunizations to include Measles-Mumps-Rubella (MMR), Varicella (chicken pox), Hepatitis B series, Diphtheria-Pertussis-Tetanus (DPT), adult Tetanus, and Influenza (flu shot); Tuberculosis exam (TB). Additional requirements for EMS classes.

EMS 180: EMT-Intermediate. (5) Meets New Mexico requirements and incorporates EMT-Intermediate scope of practice, to include lecture and lab instruction, including intravenous fluid administration and pharmacology. Upon successful completion of the course, students will be eligible to sit for the National Registry Advanced EMT licensing examination. Prerequisite: EMS 113 and EMS 142. Co-requisite: EMS 143 and EMS 151.  Restriction: program permission. During the first two weeks of class, students must have completed the following requirements: American Heart Association Healthcare Provider CPR Certification; 10 panel illegal drug screening; caregiver background screening and finger printing ($73.30 fee); immunizations to include Measles-Mumps-Rubella (MMR), Varicella (chicken pox), Hepatitis B series, Diphtheria-Pertussis-Tetanus (DPT), adult Tetanus, and Influenza (flu shot); Tuberculosis exam (TB). Additional requirements for EMS classes. A UNM Certificate is awarded upon successful completion of this course.

EMS 193: Emergency Medicine Topics (1-3) Titles will vary.


Engineering (ENG)

CE 202: Engineering Statics. (3) Statics of particles and rigid bodies, in two and three dimensions using vector algebra as an analytical tool; centroids; distributed loads; trusses, frames, internal forces, friction. Prerequisites: Grade of C or higher in PHYS 1310 and MATH 1522.

ECE 131: Programming Fundamentals. (3) Fundamental programming concepts, including consideration of abstract machine models with emphasis on the memory hierarchy, basic programming constructs, functions, parameter passing, pointers and arrays, file I/O, bit-level operations and interfacing to external devices. Prerequisite: Grade of C or higher in MATH 1220 or higher, or ACT Math score of 25+, or SAT Math score of 570+, or ACCUPLACER 249+ (A&F).

ECE 203: Circuit Analysis I. (3) Basic elements and sources. Energy and power. Ohm's law and Kirchhoff's laws. Resistive networks, node and loop analysis. Network theorems. First-order and second-order circuits. Sinusoidal sources and complex representations: impedance, phasors, complex power. Three-phase circuits. Prerequisite: Grade of C or higher in ENG 120 or MATH 1522. Pre or co-requisite: PHYS 1320.

ENG 120: Mathematics for Engineering Applications. (4) Provides an overview of basic engineering mathematics topics necessary for success in second-year engineering courses. Topics are presented in the context of engineering applications and reinforced through labs and examples from core engineering courses. Prerequisite: Grade of C or higher in MATH 1220.

ENG 130L: Introduction to Engineering Computing. (3) An introduction to the use of computing to solve engineering problems. Students learn computer programming fundamentals and learn to use a numerical computing environment (e.g. MATLAB). Applications to engineering problems are explored.

ENG 144: Pre-Calculus and Trigonometry for Engineering .(5) Algebraic expressions, algebraic equations, inequalities, functions, graphing. Exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions. Complex numbers and vectors. Limits. Prerequisites/placement: Successful completion of MATH 1220, or ACCUPLACER score of 249+ (A&F) or ACT 25+ or SAT 570+.

ENG 195: Special Topics: Introduction to Engineering. (3) Orientation to various fields of engineering; introduction to the engineering design process; exploration of careers in engineering.

ENG 195: Special Topics in Engineering. (1-6) Selected topics in engineering and/or computer science at the introductory level.

ENG 200: Technology in Society. (3) This is an introduction to the ways in which technology shapes the world, and is itself shaped by society, culture, politics, economics, and history. Topics include industrialization, technological changes, cultural impact, environmental policies, and social and ethical responsibilities. Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area IV: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

ENGF 293: Topics. (1-6) Selected topics in engineering. 

 

English (ENGL)

Developmental Writing Courses:

ENGL 099: Developmental English. (4) An intensive study of fundamental writing skills, focusing upon paragraph development and fluency; introduces essay writing and includes a skills laboratory. Grade option: RA, RB, RCR/RNC. Prerequisites/placement: Minimum writing ACCUPLACER score of <55, or verbal ACT score of 14.

ENGL 100: Writing Standard English. (4) Developmental writing course providing concentrated practice writing and revising basic essays, as well as intensive study of grammar, punctuation, and usage and includes a skills laboratory. Grade option: RA, RB, RCR/RNC. Prerequisites/placement: Successful completion of ENGL 099 (RA, RB, or RCR) or minimum writing ACCUPLACER score of 55-68, or verbal ACT score of 17. Co-requisite: UNIV 101.


Expository and Professional Writing Courses:

ENGL 1110: Composition I. (3) Requires minimum ACT Verbal score of 19 for placement. In this course, students will read, write, and think about a variety of issues and texts. They will develop reading and writing skills that will help with the writing required in their fields of study and other personal and professional contexts. Students will learn to analyze rhetorical situations in terms of audience, contexts, purpose, mediums, and technologies and apply this knowledge to their reading and writing. They will also gain an understanding of how writing and other modes of communication work together for rhetorical purposes. Students will learn to analyze the rhetorical context of any writing task and compose with purpose, audience, and genre in mind. Students will reflect on their own writing processes, learn to workshop drafts with other writers, and practice techniques for writing, revising, and editing. Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area 1: Writing and Speaking.

ENGL 1110X: Composition I: Stretch I (3) For students with ACT Verbal score of <19; does not count toward Core Curriculum Writing and Speaking requirements, but does count as elective credit for graduation. This is the first term of a two-term “Stretch” sequence (with ENGL 1110Y); the intention is that students remain with their cohort and their teacher over both courses in successive semesters.

ENGL 1110Y: Composition I: Stretch II. (3) Students are placed in ENGL 1110Y after they have received a grade of “C” or higher in ENGL 1110X in the previous term. Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area 1: Writing and Speaking.

ENGL 1110Z: Enhanced Composition. (4) This “Studio” option covers the requirements and student learning outcomes of ENGL 1110 with the addition of a 1 credit writing lab. All 4 credits generate undergraduate credit; 3 of the 4 credits meet core curriculum requirements.Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area 1: Writing and Speaking.

ENGL 1120: Composition II. (3) In this course, students will explore argument in multiple genres. Research and writing practices emphasize summary, analysis, evaluation, and integration of secondary sources. Students will analyze rhetorical situations in terms of audience, contexts, purpose, mediums, and technologies and apply this knowledge to their reading, writing, and research. Students will sharpen their understanding of how writing and other modes of communication work together for rhetorical purposes. The emphasis of this course will be on research methods. Can serve as initial composition course for students with ACT Verbal score of 26-28; serves as second course in composition sequence for students who have earned a “C” or higher in ENGL 1110. Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area 1: Writing and Speaking.

ENGL 1210: Technical Communications. (3) This is an introductory study of written and verbal communications used in the technical professions with emphasis in the planning, execution, and editing of professional and technical documents and other communication media. Students are encouraged to speak with an advisor about the applicability of this course. Prerequisite: ENGL 1110.

ENGL 2120: Intermediate Composition. (3) This course builds upon and refines the writing skills acquired in previous writing courses, with a focus on non-fiction prose. Research, composition, exposition and presentation abilities will be practiced and developed. Through analysis and revision, students will develop strategies to improve the versatility and impact of their writing. Course topics and emphases may vary by section. Prerequisite: ENGL 1110 (C or higher) and ENGL 1120 (C or higher), or verbal ACT score 26, or verbal SAT score 610. Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area 1: Writing and Speaking.

ENGL 2210: Professional and Technical Communication. (3) Professional and Technical Communication will introduce students to the different types of documents and correspondence that they will create in their professional careers. This course emphasizes the importance of audience, document design, and the use of technology in designing, developing, and delivering documents. This course will provide students with experience in professional correspondence and communicating technical information to a non-technical audience. Prerequisite: ENGL 1110 (C or higher), and ENGL 1120 (C or higher), or verbal ACT score 26, or verbal SAT score 610. Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area 1: Writing and Speaking.

ENGL 2220: Introduction to Professional Writing. (3) A beginning course in the professional writing concentration. Study of technical writing, public information and public relations writing and freelance nonfiction writing. Prerequisite: ENGL 1120.

ENGL 2310: Introduction to Creative Writing. (3) This course will introduce students to the basic elements of creative writing, including short fiction, poetry, and creative nonfiction. Students will read and study published works as models, but the focus of this "workshop" course is on students revising and reflecting on their own writing. Throughout this course, students will be expected to read poetry, fiction, and non-fiction closely, and analyze the craft features employed. They will be expected to write frequently in each of these genres. Prerequisite: ENGL 1110.

ENGL 2993: Writing Workshop. (1-3, maximum of 6) Various topics in literature, language and writing.

 

Literature and Language Courses:

ENGL 1410: Introduction to Literature. (3) In this course, students will examine a variety of literary genres, including fiction, poetry, and drama. Students will identify common literary elements in each genre, understanding how specific elements influence meaning. Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area 5: Humanities.

ENGL 1710: Greek Mythology. (3) Introduction to mythology; primary readings in stories about the gods and heroes, usually including Homer, Hesiod, Homeric hymns and tragedies.

ENGL 2110: Traditional Grammar. (3) This course surveys traditional grammar, introducing linguistic terminology and methods for identifying and understanding parts of speech, parts of sentences and basic sentence patterns. The course presents terminology and methods designed to increase the student’s understanding of the structure of the language. Suggested prerequisite: ENGL 100.

Engl 2510: Analysis of Literature. (3) This course is an introduction to literary analysis and writing applied to literary techniques, conventions, and themes. Students will learn how to write focused literary analyses, demonstrating their understanding of biographical, critical, cultural, and historical contexts of various writers and genres. Students will also learn proper documentation, as well as other skills, such as quoting, paraphrasing, and integrating sources, both primary and secondary.  Prerequisite: ENGL 1120.

ENGL 2540: Introduction to Chicana/o Literature. (3) This course examines a variety of literary genres to explore the historical development of Chicano/a social and literary identities. This survey offers an overview of the history of Chicano/a literature, introducing the major trends and placing them into an historical framework.

ENGL 2560: Introduction to Native American Literature. (3) This course will introduce students to the literature produced by Native American authors as well as explore issues relevant to the study of Native American literature. The course will also introduce the basic elements of literary analysis.

ENGL 2610: American Literature I. (3) This course surveys American literature from the colonial period to the mid-nineteenth century. This course provides students with the contexts and documents necessary to understand the origins of American Literature and the aesthetic, cultural, and ideological debates central to early American culture.

ENGL 2620: American Literature II. (3) This course surveys American literature from the mid-nineteenth-century to the contemporary period. This course provides students with the contexts and documents necessary to understand American Literature and the aesthetic, cultural, and ideological debates central to American culture.

ENGL 2630: British Literature I. (3) This course offers a study of British literature from its origins in Old English to the 18th century. This survey covers specific literary works—essays, short stories, novels, poems, and plays—as well as the social, cultural, and intellectual currents that influenced the literature.

ENGL 2640: British Literature II. (3) This course offers a study of British literature from the 18th century to the present. This survey covers specific literary works—short stories, novels, poems, and plays—as well as the social, cultural, and intellectual currents that influenced the literature.

ENGL 2650: World Literature I. (3) In this course, students will read representative world masterpieces from ancient, medieval, and Renaissance literature. Students will broaden their understanding of literature and their knowledge of other cultures through exploration of how literature represents individuals, ideas and customs of world cultures. The course focuses strongly on examining the ways literature and culture intersect and define each other. Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area 5: Humanities.

ENGL 2660: World Literature II. (3) In this course, students will read representative world masterpieces from the 1600s to the present. Students will broaden their understanding of literature and their knowledge of other cultures through exploration of how literature represents individuals, ideas and customs of world cultures. The course focuses strongly on examining the ways literature and culture intersect and define each other. Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area 5: Humanities.

ENGL 2670: African-American Literature.  (3) This course introduces students to the African-American classics of the slavery era. Daily experiences of the characters in these books become the basis for discussing race, class, gender, revolt, freedom, peace and humanity.

ENGL 2996: Topics in English. (3) May be repeated twice for credit, as long as content is different. Prerequisite: ENGL 1410.


Environmental Science (ENVS) – these courses are listed as Geology for Fall 2019 only

ENVS 1130: The Blue Planet. (3) To understand global change and environmental concerns, this course weaves together an understanding of Earth’s systems, including the lithosphere, atmosphere hydrosphere, and biosphere. We will look at scientific approaches to understanding human interactions and impacts on Earth systems. Co-requisite: ENVS 1130L. Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences.

ENVS 1130L: The Blue Planet Laboratory. (1) Laboratory course for The Blue Planet. In our Blue Planet labs, students will often work together to collect data and students are encouraged to discuss their observations and ideas, but students are expected to write their own answers in their own words on their worksheets. Co-requisite: ENVS 1130. Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences.


First Year Experience (FYEX)

FYEX 1110: First-Year Seminar. (1-3 to a maximum of 6) Designed to accelerate successful transition to university life. Grade option: A, B, CR/NC.

FYEX 1996: Topics (1-3 to a maximum of 6) Designed to engage students who share academic interests with their intended major, college or school.

FYEX 2996: Topics (1-3 to a maximum of 6) Both general and discipline-specific sections offered. Students will explore their goals, passions, and skills, and the steps and tools related to success in school and career.


French (FREN)

FREN 1110: French I. (3) Intended for students with no previous exposure to French, this course develops basic listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills aiming toward the ACTFL novice-high level. This is an introductory course designed to teach the student to communicate in French in everyday situations and to develop an understanding of French and Francophone cultures through the identification of cultural products and practices, of cultural perspectives, and the ability to function at a survival level in an authentic cultural content. This course will also develop the student’s sense of personal and social responsibility through the identification of social issues. Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area 6: Foreign Language.

FREN 1120: French II. (3) A continuation of French I, students will develop a broader foundation in skills gained during the first semester, including understanding, speaking, reading and writing French aiming toward the ACTFL intermediate-low level. This course is designed to increase student fluency in French as applied to everyday situations. Students will also learn to recognize and understand various French and Francophone products, practices, and perspectives, identifying common cultural patterns, describing basic cultural viewpoints, and further developing their sense of personal and social responsibility through the investigation of cultural issues. Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area 6: Foreign Language.

FREN 1130: French Conversation. (1) This course is to provide students with practice in speaking French at a beginning level. It is designed to give students basic conversational skills while reviewing previously studied structures and vocabulary. The main focus is to provide students with the confidence and language necessary to get along in French-speaking environment, as well as expose them, in a more in-depth way, to various aspects of Francophone culture. Pre or co-requisite: FREN 1110 or FREN 1120.

FREN 1150: Accelerated Elementary French. (6) Encompasses the work of FREN 1110 and 1120. FREN 1110/1120 and FREN 1150 may not both be counted for credit.

FREN 2110: French III. (3) In this third semester course, students will continue to develop a broader foundation in skills gained during the first year, including understanding, speaking, reading and writing French aiming toward the ACTFL intermediate-mid level. This course is designed to teach the student to communicate in a more sustained way in areas of personal interest and in everyday situations. Students will engage in and analyze various French and Francophone products, practices, and perspectives, as well as continue to develop their sense of personal and social responsibility through comparison and contrast of cultural perspectives. Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area 6: Foreign Language.

FREN 2120: French IV. (3) In this fourth semester course, students will continue to broaden and refine skills gained during previous semesters, including understanding, speaking, reading and writing French aiming at the ACTFL intermediate-high level. This course is designed to teach the student to communicate in a more sustained way in situations that go beyond the everyday. Students will evaluate various French and Francophone products, practices, and create ways to demonstrate their sense of personal and social responsibility through participation in cultural interaction. Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area 6: Foreign Language.


Film and Digital Arts (FDMA, formerly IFDM, MA)

FDMA 1210: Digital Video Production I. (3) An introduction to digital video production. Students learn camera operation, lights and audio equipment. Hands-on production is completed in the studio and on location. Special fee required.

FDMA 1520: Introduction to Film and Digital Media. (3) This course is designed to provide students with a survey of the histories, innovative concepts, and creative possibilities of digital media. Within both the lecture hall and the studio lab, students will consider a wide variety of digital media processes and applications. Additionally, students will learn fundamental skills in teamwork, storytelling, and design. Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area 4: Social and Behavioral Sciences; or Area 5: Humanities; or Area 7: Arts and Design.

FDMA 2110: Introduction to Film Studies. (3) This course introduces students to the fundamentals in film history, criticism, and theory. Though viewing and analysis of a variety of narrative, documentary, and experimental films, students will advance their understanding of key issues in filmic representation and aesthetics. A range of approaches will be employed in understanding the aesthetic and cultural significance of the medium, including feminism, post-colonialism, critical race theory, and modernism. Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area 7: Arts and Design.  

FDMA 2195: Beyond Hollywood. (3) This course concentrates on the representation of children and adolescents in world cinema. The portrayal of children throughout world cinema has a long and rich complex history, which has been primarily shaped by family and national structures. Through film screenings, readings, and discussions class will center on the exploration of what it means to look at children and what cultural baggage are their bodies asked to carry. Also, what impact do national and global politics have on the lives of children? Through the establishment and use of basic vocabulary and analytic methodologies of film studies, larger theoretical and practical questions about how cinema functions as a cultural and ideological force, especially how it helps to construct ideas about the family, the nation, and national identities will be addressed. Class screenings will cover a breadth of children and adolescents in world cinema but readings, discussions, and outside film viewings will provide a more comprehensive overall picture.

FDMA 2520: Introduction to Cinematography. (3) The Director of Photography (or Cinematographer), in close collaboration with the Director and Production Designer, helps determine the look of a film. This course is designed to introduce students to the technical and aesthetic fundamentals of creating, developing, and collaborating on the visual elements of storytelling, using camera framing, lensing, and lighting fundamentals such as shadows, light and color. Prerequisites: FDMA 1310 and FDMA 1550.

FDMA 2996: Topics in Digital Media Arts. (1-4) May be repeated for credit as long as the topic is different.

 

Game Design and Simulation (GAME)

GAME 101: Introduction to Game Development. (3) Introductory game development concepts and techniques. Topics common to all game development: history of modern games, player considerations, game elements, storytelling and narrative, character development, game play experience, levels, interface design, audio, strategy, and project management.

GAME 102: Introduction to Game Engines. (3) This course focuses on real-time programming, using event-driven game scripting languages in both commercial and open-source gaming engines but mainly focusing on the Unity Game Engine. Students participate in both individual, hands-on exercises, as well as game development teamwork to design and build functional games, using existing game engines, including discussions and recommendations for game engines to fit industry specifications. Prerequisites: GAME 101.

GAME 120: Game Testing. (3) Testing and debugging gaming and simulation applications in the Alpha and Beta stages of production. Product critiques and written documentation of testing and debugging processes. Assigned projects, readings, presentations, exams and group critiques will assist in preparing the student for further study in game development.

GAME 125: 3D Modeling and Animation. (3) This course focuses on skill development covering the 3D computer graphics pipeline, using Autodesk Maya, 3DS Ma, and/or Blender and other software. Upon completion of this course, students will gain the foundation needed to create games and game assets.

GAME 130: Digital Imaging Techniques. (3) This course provides students with a fundamental working knowledge of the technical, aesthetic, and conceptual aspects of digital imaging techniques, digital photography, and the Adobe Photoshop Creative Suite software to provide a foundation in game asset building, texturing and design. Lectures, demonstrations, group/online discussions, and other online content will introduce various issues associated with the digital media presented and accompanying technologies.

GAME 150: Character Animation and Rigging. (3) Create computer games utilizing game development tools that require no programming including 2D graphics, 3D modeling, music and sound effects. Tasks include: game setup, development studio, manipulating graphic images, creating sounds/music, pictures and animation. Prerequisite: GAME 125.

GAME 160: Game Engine Scripting. (3) This course focuses on game scripting programming languages with an emphasis on game concepts and simulations directly related to game engines, both commercial and open-source, although a focus will be on the Unity game engine C++ and JavaScript. Students will work in small teams to produce a 2D or 3D computer game, using the Unity Game Engine. Students will be expected to fill multiple roles in the production process and gain hands-on experience in the collaborative processes of game design, project management, programming, graphics and animation, and playtesting. Prerequisite: GAME 102.

GAME 180: Game Programming. (3) The course focuses on game programming, using various languages, such as C++. Topics will include points and vectors, sound, and graphics. Lectures, demonstrations, discussions, and other content will introduce various issues of game programming. Prerequisite: GAME 102.

GAME 220: Environmental Modeling. (3) This course teaches students how to create full scale environments working within small production teams. Students will create full realistic and stylized environments in 3D Studio Max, covering the modeling and texturing required. Prerequisite: GAME 125.

GAME 250: Character and Creature Modeling. (3) This course continues the focus on core methodologies for collaborative game development. The iterative development process will be enhanced through online communication strategies, version control and a rigorous review process. Independent online marketing strategies will be introduced and utilized for the final project. Prerequisite: GAME 125.

GAME 260: Level Design. (3) This course introduces the tools and concepts used to create levels for games and simulations. The course focuses on level design: architecture theory, concepts of critical path and flow, balancing, play testing, and storytelling, utilizing toolsets from industry titles. Lectures, demonstrations, discussions, and other content will introduce various issues of game-level design. Prerequisite: GAME 125.

GAME 275: 3D Lighting and Shading. (3) This course is a study of various global, scene and character lighting techniques, shading and shadowing, and atmospheres and reflections that bring computer-generated 3D scenes to life in the digital production process. Prerequisite: GAME 125.

GAME 280: Audio for Gaming. (3) This course examines the art, craft, and business of video game audio, including music, sound design and voice-over. It is an exploration of how the game development process works and the evolution of game audio and related topics. Prerequisite: GAME 102.

GAME 293: Topics: Game Production II. (1-4) Game design and simulation topics course. May be repeated for credit provided content is not the same.

GAME 296: Capstone: Production and Portfolio. (3) Students are tasked with creating a portfolio and/or reel highlighting their work, skills, and ability for job placement in the field. Permission of instructor required. Student must be enrolled in the last semester of their program.

 

Gender Studies (GNDR)

GNDR 2110: Introduction to Women, Gender, and Sexuality (3) This course introduces students to key concepts, debates, and analytical tools informing Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies. As an interdisciplinary field of study, Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies employs academic perspectives from a range of disciplines and theoretical approaches. It also incorporates lived experience and social location into its object of analysis.

 

General Studies (GNST)

GNST 193: Topics. (1-3) General reading and class discussion in topical areas of interest requested by students or community entities.

 

Geography (GEOG)

GEOG 217: Energy, Environment, and Society (also offered as ME 217). (3) This course is a look at the social, ethical, and environmental impacts of energy use in the contemporary world and throughout history. It is a survey of renewable energy and conservation, and their impact on environmental and social systems.

 

Geology (GEOL), formerly Earth and Planetary Science (EPS) 

GEOL 1110: Physical Geology. (3) Physical Geology is an introduction to our dynamic Earth introducing students to the materials that make up Earth (rocks and minerals) and the processes that create and modify the features of our planet. The course will help students learn how mountains are formed, how volcanoes erupt, where earthquakes occur, and how water, wind, and ice can shape the landscape. Students will also develop a basic understanding of the ways humans have altered the planet including our impact on natural resources and global climate change. Co-requisite: GEOL 1110L. Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences.

GEOL 1110L: Physical Geology Laboratory. (1) Physical Geology Lab is the laboratory component of Physical Geology. Students will learn to identify rocks and minerals in hand samples, work with topographic maps, geologic maps, and geologic cross-sections, and apply stratigraphic principles to explore geologic time. Co-requisite: GEOL 1110. Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences.

GEOL 1140: Geological Disasters. (3) This course will incorporate an overview of the geological processes that result in natural disasters and the input humans have on the amplification or mitigation of these natural disasters. We will examine past catastrophes and discuss the probability of such disasters occurring again. Hazards investigated will include, but not be limited to earthquakes, volcanoes, tsunami, hurricanes, floods, landslides, and astronomical events such as meteor and comet collisions with Earth. We will investigate the data obtained from recent disasters and explore the costs in human and economic terms.

GEOL 2110C: Historical Geology. (4) This course reviews the major geological and biological processes and events over the Earth’s 4.6-billion-year history. Students will learn about the formation of the Earth and its development through time including changes in the lithosphere, atmosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere. The interrelationships between the physical aspects of Earth history and biological origins, evolution of species, and causes of extinctions will be explored. This course combined the lecture and laboratory into one course. Prerequisite: GEOL 1110/GEOL 1110L or GEOL 1120/GEOL 1120L. Meets UNMCC – Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences; meets NMCC – Area III: Laboratory Science.

GEOL 2140: Geology of New Mexico. (3) This course is a tour of the geologic history and natural places of New Mexico. Students will explore the materials (rocks and minerals) that make up New Mexico and the processes that created and continue to shape our state. Students will learn about mountains, rivers and seas that have come and gone, and New Mexico’s rich fossil heritage. Students will discover where and why volcanoes erupted, and where natural resources are found and extracted.

GEOL 2996: Topics. (1-3) May be repeated for credit as long as the topic is different.

 

Health Career Health Sciences (HCHS)

HCHS 111: Medical Terminology. (3) An introduction to terminology used in health careers. It will provide a basic knowledge of prefixes, suffixes, and root words used in describing anatomical parts of the human body as well as general terms relating to disease processes.

HCHS 113: Basic Body Structures and Functions. (4) An introductory course in anatomy and physiology for students from diverse backgrounds and varying levels of educational preparation. No prior knowledge of biology or chemistry is assumed.

HCHS 115: Pharmacology for Health Occupations. (3) An introduction to principles for drug classification, usage, contraindications, dosage, and computations.

 

Health Career Health Technology (HCHT)

HCHT 121: Health Technology I. (4) An introduction to health technology, with topics to include: the history and regulation of medical record documentation, public health initiatives, the structure and language of healthcare delivery, reimbursement and billing practices, electronic health records and coding, patient privacy and security, and certification processes in health technology.

HCHT 211: Basic ICD/CPT Coding. (4) Students will learn the coding nomenclature and coding conventions for the CPT, ICD-10-CM, and Level II (HCPCS) coding systems, and apply the coding conventions and guidelines to code patient diagnoses, outpatient services, and medical supplies and pharmaceuticals. A variety of payment systems are also presented, along with Medicare fraud and abuse information. Prerequisite: HCHS 111.

HCHT 213: Principles of Disease. (4) An introduction to human pathophysiology for non-nursing health professionals, with topics to include: cellular function, immunity, cancer, and human systems (gastrointestinal, hematologic, nervous, skeletal, reproductive, and cardiovascular). Prerequisites: HCHS 111, HCHS 113.

HCHT 215: Advanced OP Coding. (2) Topics related to medical coding will include: format of CPT and ICD, coding guidelines, descriptions and definitions of symbols, correct use of modifiers, accessing Encoder coding resources, and payment methodology. Prerequisite: HCHT 211.

HCHT 219: Advanced IP Coding (3) Practice assigning ICD-9, ICD-10, and ICD-10 PCS codes using inpatient diagnosis, procedures and reports, using the 3M encode. Prerequisite: HCHT 211.

HCHT 221: Medical-Legal and Quality Management. (4) This course explores the management of healthcare-related information by Health Information Management (HIM) departments in the United States. Prerequisite: HCHT 121.

HCHT 222: Health Technology II. (4) This course covers supervisory principles and electronic medical records, including collection, arrangement, presentation and verification of healthcare data. Also included are reimbursement methodologies, confidentiality rules and regulations, and uses of coded data. Prerequisite: HCHT 121.

HCHT 231: Computer Applications and Healthcare Statistics. (4) This course introduces the student to computer applications in the healthcare industry and methods used to control the security of information, with topics to include: the concepts and procedures used in the preparation of statistical reports, including vital statistics, census systems, rates and percentages. Prerequisites: HCHT 121, BCIS 1110, or permission of instructor.

HCHT 232: Reimbursement Methodologies. (3) This course presents information about insurance programs and federal healthcare legislation. It provides a basic knowledge of claims management, medical necessity and coding systems. Pre or co-requisite: HCHT 211.

HCHT 233: Professional Practicum Experience. (6) The student will receive hands-on experience in a Health Information Management setting under a Practicum Site Manager, who is trained in the specific areas of Health Information Technology in which the student will be gaining experience. Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of all HCHT program core courses.

 

Health Education (HLED)

HLED 1113: First Aid and CPR. (1-3) A video-based, instructor-led course that teaches students critical skills needed to respond to and manage an emergency until emergency medical services arrives. Skills covered in this course include first aid; choking relief in adults, children, and infants; and what to do for sudden cardiac arrest in adults, children, and infants. Upon successful completion of the course, students will become eligible for AHA Heartsaver® First Aid & CPR/AED certification.

HLED 1220: Concepts of Health and Wellness. (3) Introduces the student to the “Seven Dimensions of Wellness” (physical, emotional, intellectual, interpersonal, spiritual, environmental, and financial). This course addresses topics including fitness, exercise, nutrition, stress management and chronic lifestyle-related diseases.

HLED 2130: Consumer Health. (1) Preparation in knowledge and skills related to consumers of health products and services.

HLED 2150: Foundations of Health Promotion. (3) For those considering becoming health majors or minors in school health or community health. Exploration of the basic philosophy and fundamental practices currently utilized in health education.

HLED 2210: Education for AIDS Prevention. (1) Familiarize yourself concerning the HIV/AIDS epidemic with awareness including basic information, prevention, history, compassion, legal issues, testing, and societal implications.

HLED 2530:Fundamentals of Human Sexuality. (3) This course provides an introduction and basic knowledge about human sexuality including anatomical, physiological, psycho-social, and ethical components. Reproduction, contraception, sexually transmitted disease, sexual health and sexual dysfunctions are among areas examined.

HLED 2996: Topics in Health Education. (1-3) May be repeated for credit, as long as the content is different.


History (HIST)

HIST 1150: Western Civilization I. (3) This course is a chronological treatment of the history of the western world from ancient times to the early modern era. The elements of this course are designed to inform students on the major events and trends that are essential in the understanding of the development of western civilization within the context of world societies. Selective attention will be given to "non-western" civilizations which impact and influence the development of "western" civilization. Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area 5: Humanities.

HIST 1160: Western Civilization II. (3) This course is a chronological treatment of the history of the western world from the early modern era to the present. The elements of this course are designed to inform students on the major events and trends that are essential in the understanding of the development of western civilization within the context of world societies. Selective attention will be given to "non-western" civilizations which impact and influence the development of "western" civilization. Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area 5: Humanities.

HIST 1110: United States History I. (3) The primary objective of this course is to serve as an introduction to the history of the United States from the pre-colonial period to the immediate aftermath of the Civil War. The elements of this course are designed to inform students on the major events and trends that are essential in the understanding of the development of the United States within the context of world societies. Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area 5: Humanities.

HIST 1120: United States History II. (3) The primary objective of this course is to serve as an introduction to the history of the United States from reconstruction to the present. The elements of this course are designed to inform students on the major events and trends that are essential in the understanding of the development of the United States within the context of world societies. Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area 5: Humanities.

HIST 1170: Survey of Early Latin America. (3) The primary objective of this course is to serve as a survey of the history of Latin America from pre-Columbian times through independence. This course will explore the contributions of Indigenous peoples, Africans, and Europeans to the creation of Latin America’s diverse societies. The elements of this course are designed to inform students on the major events and trends that are essential to the understanding of the history of Latin America within the context of world societies. Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area 5: Humanities.

HIST 1180: Survey Modern Latin America. (3) The primary objective of this course is to serve as a survey of the history of Latin America from independence to the present. This course will explore the contributions of Indigenous peoples, Africans, and Europeans to the creation of Latin America’s diverse societies. The elements of this course are designed to inform students on the major events and trends that are essential to the understanding of the history of Latin America within the context of world societies. Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area 5: Humanities.

HIST 1190: Medieval Europe. (3) This course will introduce students to the history and culture of Medieval Europe. It is designed to provide students with an understanding of specific topics such as the growth of Christianity, feudalism, social conformity, and the responses of the people to the challenges of famine, disease, and warfare. For this purpose, the course is organized chronologically and topically.

HIST 2110: Survey of New Mexico History. (3) The primary objective of this course is to serve as an introduction to the history of New Mexico from the pre-Columbian times to the present day. The elements of this course are designed to inform students on the major events and trends that are essential in the understanding of the development of New Mexico within the context of the Americas.

HIST 2255: Traditional Eastern Civilizations. (3) This course surveys nearly all of Asia (East, South, and West) from antiquity to approximately 1600 CE. The focus is on the development of three major civilizations: Chinese, South Asian, and Islamic. Topics with comparative potential include governing institutions, social structures, economies and trade, belief systems, and artistic expressions.

HIST 2256: Modern Eastern Civilizations. (3) This course surveys nearly all of Asia (East, South, and West) from approximately 1600 CE to present day. The focus is on the development of three major civilizations: Chinese, South Asian, and Islamic. Topics with comparative potential include governing institutions, social structures, economies and trade, belief systems, and artistic expressions.

 

Information Technology (IT)

IT 101: Computer Fundamentals. (1-3) This course is designed for students with little or no computer experience. The course will prepare the student to utilize computer hardware and software effectively and efficiently. The student is given the opportunity to learn to use electronic mail, explore the web, perform basic file management procedures (copy, rename, create subdirectories, etc.), and edit, format, and print simple documents. The student will also have an opportunity to learn basic information of computer systems to include the functions of various hardware components, the importance of software programs, how information is processed, and the social and ethical implications of the computer generation.

IT 110: Introduction to Online Publications and Presentations. (1) This course provides the student with basic information about the graphics arts career and corresponding skills. The student is given the opportunity to learn various terminology associated with desktop publishing and presentation graphics as well as the basic skills to produce simple yet effective publications and electronic slide presentations. Suggested prerequisite: IT 101 or prior experience with computers.

IT 116: Fundamentals of Graphic Design. (3) This course is designed to provide students with a fundamental working  knowledge of computer-generated graphics and two-dimensional media work, preparing the student for further study in graphic and media arts.

IT 121: Electronic Spreadsheets. (3) Introduction to concepts and applications of electronic spreadsheets. Suggested pre or co-requisite: BCIS 1110 with grade of C or better.

IT 122: Introduction to Database Management Systems. (3) Students will study theory of database management systems (DBMS) and will write generic and reusable programs using DBMS software. Suggested prerequisite: BCIS 1110 with grade of C or better.

IT 125: Microcomputer Operating Systems. (3) Introductory concepts in microcomputer operating systems. Acquaints students with practical aspects of microcomputer operating systems including file management systems, utilities, and computer peripherals. Suggested prerequisite: BCIS 1110 with grade of C or better.

IT 131: Introduction to Hardware Installation. (3) The purpose of this course is to prepare students to take and pass the CompTIA national certification test. Students will learn function, structure, operations, file management, and memory management. Students will also practice proper safety procedures, scheduled preventative maintenance, and installation of computer components. In addition, students will configure, diagnose, and troubleshoot stand-alone computers. Finally, students will learn and apply industry accepted customer service skills. Prerequisite: IT 125.

IT 140: Technical Customer Service. (3) The purpose of the course is to expose students to a wide range of customer concerns regarding the software and hardware problems. Students will identify the problem with the computer and/or software, then explain it in layman’s terms and recommend corrective actions. This will be accomplished by simulating real-life hardware/software problems. A portion of the class will address customer expectations, handling irate customers, and proactive problem control. Pre or co-requisites: IT 205, IT 222, IT 230.

IT 193: Topics I. (1-4) May be repeated for credit provided content is not the same.

IT 205: Web Design Methodology. (3) Students will create and manage Web sites using various programming languages, multimedia and CSS standards. This course focuses on theory, design and Web construction, along with information architecture concepts, Web project management, scenario development and performance evaluations.

IT 222: Database Management Systems. (3) This course is a continuation of IT 122. Students will write more complex generic and reusable DBMS programs to build finished, turnkey applications. Prerequisite: IT 122.

IT 230: Computer Networking. (4) Students will learn the fundamentals of network technology, technical concepts of network environments, identify the basic characteristics for local and wide area networks, list and describe the layers of the OSI networking model, list and identify the use of common network devices, describe the procedure for installing and configuring network adapters, list common network protocols, identify the best network protocol, describe the physical characteristics of a LAN, identify inter-network connectivity hardware by sight, define the roles of clients, servers, and peers on a network, list the most common network operating systems, identify potential network bottlenecks, and list fault tolerance procedures.

IT 262: Scripting for Network Defense. (3) Scripting programming for security purposes. Students build on prior programming, operating systems, and security knowledge to develop, code, use, and debug new and existing scripts.

IT 293: Topics II. (1-4) May be repeated for credit provided content is not the same.

IT 295: Practicum/Cooperative Education. (3) Students are placed in a business in order to gain on-the-job skills and knowledge. Prerequisite: approval of the instructor; enrolled in the last semester of the associate degree or certificate program.

 

Linguistics (LING)

LING 2110: Introduction to the Study of Language and Linguistics. (3) This course presents an introduction to the study of language through the basic aspects of linguistic analysis: the sound system (phonetics and phonology), the structure of words and sentences (morphology and syntax), and the ways in which language is used to convey meaning (semantics and pragmatics). In addition, the course will investigate how language is acquired and stored in the brain, and how differences in speech styles and dialects reflect different social and cultural backgrounds of individual speakers. Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area 4: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

LING 2996: Topics in Linguistics. (3). May be repeated for credit, as long as the content is different.


Manufacturing and Electro-Mechanical Technology (MFGT, ELCT)

ELCT 105L: Industrial Shop Practice. (3) This course covers principles of and practice with hand and machine tools used by electromechanical technicians, including lathe and milling machines, drilling, welding, sawing, grinding, soldering, brazing, measurements, sheet metal work, and benchwork.

MFGT 101: Technology Foundations. (3) This course prepares students for analytical and critical thinking in an integrated approach to learning and applying mathematical, reading, writing, and oral communication skills in manufacturing and industrial technology programs of study.

MFGT 103: Technology in Advanced Manufacturing. (3) This course introduces manufacturing processes and basic mechanical, electrical, and fluid power principles and practices used in manufacturing environments. Students will study product life cycle, and focus on technologies used in the production process. Pre or co-requisite: MFGT 101.

MFGT 104: Fluid Power Basics. (3) This course introduces the student to fluid power principles and components. It teaches basic circuit design through the use of symbols and schematic diagrams to build a foundation for career work in fluid power technology. Pre or co-requisite: MFGT 101 or MATH 115.

MFGT 105: Manufacturing Materials and Processes. (3) In this modern, quantitative approach to manufacturing, there will be balanced coverage of the three basic engineering materials – metals, ceramics, polymers, as well as composites – along with recently-developed manufacturing processes and electronics manufacturing technologies.

MFGT 105L: Manufacturing Materials and Processes Laboratory. (1) In this modern, quantitative approach to manufacturing, there will be balanced coverage of the three basic engineering materials – metals, ceramics, polymers, as well as composites – along with recently-developed manufacturing processes and electronics manufacturing technologies.

MFGT 106: Key Principles of Advanced Manufacturing. (3) This course introduces the basic principles and practices of safety and quality and covers current quality control concepts and techniques in industry with emphasis on modern manufacturing requirements and environments. MSSC and OSHA certifications possible. Pre or co-requisite: MFGT 101.

MFGT 150: Machine Maintenance and Installation. (3) This course examines procedures for the removal, repair, and installation of machine components, including lubrication practices and maintenance procedures. Techniques in calibration and repair and practice in computations pertaining to industrial machinery are also covered. Prerequisite: MFGT 101 or MATH 115.

MFGT 160: Automation: Mechatronics Mechanical Systems (3). This course covers the basics and roles of the mechanical components and electrical drives in a complex mechatronic system. Strategies on maintaining, troubleshooting, documenting, and following safety measures will also be presented. Pre or co-requisite: MFGT 150.

MFGT 204: Fluid Power Systems: Hydraulics and Pneumatics (3). This course introduces complex fluid power circuits and the designing, analyzing and troubleshooting of complex circuits using schematic diagrams. Detailed construction, disassembling and evaluating of typical industrial fluid power components is covered. Prerequisite: MFGT 104.

MFGT 210: Metrology (3). This course emphasizes the theoretical and practical applications of measurement principles as applied to various physical properties. It introduces students to measurement of pressure, mass, force, torque, temperature, humidity, flow, and rotational motion.

MFGT 215: Mechanical Behavior of Materials (3). The study of mechanical properties of materials and their limitations in engineering design by the study of stresses, strains, torsion forces, shear forces, and deflections placed upon these materials.

MFGT 217: Mechanical Design Processes (3). Students learn how to identify customer needs, develop product specification, apply structured methods to generate product concepts, evaluate diverse product concepts, and select and refine the most promising design through project work.

MFGT 222: Automation: Mechatronics Pressurized Systems (3). This course covers the basics of pneumatic, electro pneumatic, and hydraulic control circuits in a complex mechatronics system. By learning the functions and properties of control elements, students will chart, measure, troubleshoot, and correct malfunctions. Pre or co-requisite: MFGT 104.

MFGT 260: Projects in Manufacturing (3). Students will formally display their knowledge and implementation of a broad range of skills by working in teams to develop and complete a manufacturing project, resulting in a product or service that solves a need. Pre or co-requisite: ENGL 110 and MATH 115. Permission of Division Chair Required.

MFGT 295: Technical Concentration I: Practicum On-the-Job Training (3). Students are placed in a business in order to gain on-the-job skills and knowledge. Permission of Division Chair Required.

MFGT 296: Technical Concentration II: Practicum On-the-Job Training (3). Students are placed in a business in order to gain on-the-job skills and knowledge. Prerequisite: MFGT 295. Permission of Division Chair Required.

MFGT 297: Technical Concentration III: Practicum On-the-Job Training (3). Students are placed in a business in order to gain on-the-job skills and knowledge. Prerequisite: MFGT 295 and MFGT 296. Permission of Division Chair Required.

MFGT 298: Technical Concentration IV: Practicum On-the-Job Training (3). Students are placed in a business in order to gain on-the-job skills and knowledge. Prerequisite: MFGT 295, MFGT 296, and MFGT 297. Permission of Division Chair Required.


Mathematics (MATH)

Note: For courses requiring a grade of C or higher in a prerequisite course, a grade of C- is not sufficient to satisfy the prerequisites for mathematics and statistics courses.

Developmental Mathematics Courses:

MATH 021: Introduction to Algebra Part I. (2) This course includes the first half of a beginning algebra course including a review of basic arithmetic, real numbers, integer exponents, linear inequalities, and an introduction to application problems. Prerequisites/placement: Successful completion of MATH 099 or minimum ACCUPLACER score of 244-259 (Arithmetic), or math ACT score of 15-16. Co-requisite: MATH 1996: Critical Thinking for Math Part I.

MATH 022: Introduction to Algebra Part II. (2) This course includes the second half of a beginning algebra course including a review of the Cartesian coordinate system, graphing linear equations in two variables, properties of exponents, polynomials and an introduction to factoring. Prerequisite: Grade of RC or higher in MATH 021. Co-requisite: MATH 1996: Critical Thinking for Math Part II.

MATH 099: Pre-Algebra. (4) This course prepares students for algebra. Topics include operations on fractions and decimals, ratios, proportions and percents, sign number operations, and elements of algebra and word problems. CR/NC. Prerequisites/placement: Minimum ACCUPLACER score of 237-243 (Arithmetic), or math ACT score of 13-14. Co-requisite: MATH 1996: Problem Solving for Algebra.

MATH 100: Introduction to Algebra. (4) This course includes a review of basic arithmetic, real numbers, integer exponents, linear inequalities, and an introduction to application problems. Also included is a review of the Cartesian coordinate system, graphing linear equations in two variables, properties of exponents, polynomials and an introduction to factoring. Prerequisites/placement: Successful completion of MATH 099 or minimum ACCUPLACER score of 244-259 (Arithmetic), or math ACT score of 14-16. Co-requisite: MATH 1996: Critical Thinking for Math.

MATH 1996: Problem Solving for Algebra. (2) This course provides a grounding in study skills, college readiness, as well as support in reviewing prerequisite knowledge to support success in MATH 099. Emphasis is placed on understanding mathematical structures. Co-requisite: MATH 099: Pre-Algebra.

MATH 1996: Critical Thinking for Math. (2) This course provides a grounding in growth mindset, college readiness, as well as support in reviewing prerequisite knowledge to support success in MATH 100 or MATH 021 (Part I) and MATH 022 (Part II). Co-requisite: MATH 100 or MATH 021 (Part I) and MATH 022 (Part II).


Study Session Course:

MATH 106: Problems in Intermediate Algebra. (1) A study session for MATH 1215 students with an emphasis on problem solving. Grade option: CR/NC. Suggested co-requisite: MATH 1215 or 1215X/1215Y/1215Z.

 

Topics Courses:

MATH 1996: Topics in Mathematics. (1-3) Topics in mathematics including, but not limited to, tools and techniques designed to improve attitudes and performance in math class, and calculator usage.

MATH 2996: Topics in Higher Mathematics. (1-3). This course will include a selection of topics from higher mathematics (beyond beginning calculus). Enrollment based on instructor recommendation.

STAT 279: Topics in Introductory Statistics. (1-3). This course provides exploration into topics in data science and statistical analysis beyond the MATH 1350 course. Enrollment based on instructor recommendation. Suggested prerequisite: Grade of C or higher in MATH 1350.


College-Level Mathematics Courses:

MATH 1215X: Intermediate Algebra, Part 1. (1) MATH 1215X, MATH 1215Y, and MATH 1215Z together are equivalent of the single course MATH 1215 Intermediate Algebra. Prerequisite: Grade of RC or higher in MATH 022 or MATH 100, or minimum ACCUPLACER score of 260-275 (Arithmetic) or ACCUPLACER score of 244-252 (QRAS) or ACCUPLACER score of 218-227 (A&F), or math ACT score of 16-17 or math SAT score of 430-489.

MATH 1215Y: Intermediate Algebra, Part 2. (1) MATH 1215X, MATH 1215Y, and MATH 1215Z together are equivalent of the single course MATH 1215 Intermediate Algebra. Prerequisite: Grade of C or higher in MATH 1215X.

MATH 1215Z: Intermediate Algebra, Part 3. (1) MATH 1215X, MATH 1215Y, and MATH 1215Z together are equivalent of the single course MATH 1215 Intermediate Algebra. Prerequisite: Grade of C or higher in MATH 1170 or MATH 1215X and 1215Y.

MATH 1215: Intermediate Algebra. (3) A study of linear and quadratic functions, and an introduction to polynomial, absolute value, rational, radical, exponential, and logarithmic functions. A development of strategies for solving single-variable equations and contextual problems. Prerequisites/placement: Grade of C or higher in MATH 022 or MATH 100 or minimum ACCUPLACER score of 276-300 (Arithmetic) or ACCUPLACER score of 253-300 (QRAS) or ACCUPLACER score of 228-238 (A&F), or math ACT score of 18-19, or math SAT score of 490-519. 

MATH 1118: Mathematics for Elementary and Middle School Teachers I. (3) Course offers and in-depth look at rational numbers, arithmetic operations, and basic geometric concepts. Problem solving is emphasized throughout. *Some students will have a co-requisite of MATH 1215X. Prerequisites/placement: Grade of C or higher in MATH 100 + MATH 1996, or MATH 021 + 022 + MATH 1996 (Parts I and II), or FYEX 1010 or MATH 1170 or other college-level mathematics course. If student has MATH 100 + MATH 1996, or MATH 021 + 022 + MATH 1996 (Parts I and II), or FYEX 1010 as a prerequisite or has these placement scores, student must take co-requisite of MATH 1215X: ACT score of 18-19 or SAT score of 490-519 or ACCUPLACER score of >=276 (Arithmetic) or ACCUPLACER score of 253-261 (QRAS) or ACCUPLACER score of 228-238 (A&F). If student has MATH 1215X or MATH 1170 or MATH 1215 or other college-level mathematics course or has these placement scores, student is not required take co-requisite of MATH 1215X: ACT score of >=20 or SAT score of >=520 or ACCUPLACER score of >=262 (QRAS) or >=233 (A&F).

MATH 1130: A Survey of Mathematics. (3) This course will develop students’ ability to work with and interpret numerical data, to apply logical and symbolic analysis to a variety of problems, and/or to model phenomena with mathematical or logical reasoning. Topics include financial mathematics used in everyday life situations, statistics, and optional topics from a wide array of authentic contexts. Prerequisites/placement: Grade of C or higher in Math 1170 or (Math 1215X AND 1215Y) or Math 1215 or Math 1220 or Math 1230 or Math 1240 or Math 1250 or Math 1350 or Math 1430 or Math 1440 or Math 1512 or Math 1522, or minimum ACCUPLACER score of >=253 (QRAS) or >=276 (Arithmetic) or >=228 (A&F); or math ACT score >=18, or math SAT score of >=490. Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area 2: Mathematics and Statistics.  

MATH 1170: Technical Mathematics. (3) This course is designed for students in technical trade, Allied Health, and Tech Prep programs. There is an expectation for minimal background in mathematics (meet high school graduation requirements). For some of you, several topics may be “easy,” for others these same topics may present a challenge, especially if it has been some time since you have done mathematical calculations and solved problems algebraically. We will begin with basic arithmetic operations on real numbers (whole numbers, fractions, decimals). We will delve into measurement in both the American Standard and International (metric) systems. We will do some algebra and work with geometric formulas. There are also sections on trigonometry and statistics. All of this will give you an overview of the types of mathematics you will likely use in technical and health fields. Prerequisite/placement: Grade of RC or higher in MATH 022 or MATH 100 or ACCUPLACER score of 276-300 (Arithmetic) or ACCUPLACER score of 253-300 (QRAS) or 228-238 (A&F).

MATH 1220: College Algebra.(3) The study of equations, functions and graphs, reviewing linear and quadratic functions, and concentrating on polynomial, rational, exponential and logarithmic functions. Emphasizes algebraic problem solving skills and graphical representation of functions. Prerequisites/placement: Grade of C or higher in MATH 1215X and 1215Y and 1215Z or MATH 1170 + MATH 1215Z or MATH 1215, or minimum ACCUPLACER score of >= 239 (A&F) or math ACT score of >=22, or math SAT score of >=540.Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area 2: Mathematics and Statistics.  

MATH 1230: Trigonometry. (3) A study of plane trigonometry including the definitions of the fundamental trig functions using right angle triangle and unit circle approaches. Trig functions of any real number will be evaluated and the functions graphed along with their transformations. Trigonometric identities will be developed and demonstrated including multiple angle identities and identities developed from them. Inverse Trigonometric functions will be developed and used to solve trigonometric equations. Trigonometric applications will be solved using right angle trigonometry and the laws of sines and cosines. Trigonometric methods will be applied to complex numbers and the use of 2D vectors and vector dot products. May be taken concurrently with MATH 1240. Prerequisites/placement: Grade of C or higher in Math 1220 or minimum ACCUPLACER score 249 (A&F), or math ACT score of 25+, or math SAT score of 570+.

MATH 1240: Pre-Calculus.(3) This course extends students’ knowledge of polynomial, rational, exponential and logarithmic functions to new contexts, including rates of change, limits, systems of equations, conic sections, and sequences and series. May be taken concurrently with MATH 1230. Prerequisites/placement: Grade of C or better in Math 1220 or minimum ACCUPLACER score 249 (A&F), or math ACT score of 25+, or math SAT score of 570+. Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area 2: Mathematics and Statistics.  

MATH 1250: Trigonometry and Pre-Calculus.(5) Trigonometry and Pre-Calculus includes the study of functions in general with emphasis on the elementary functions: algebraic, exponential, logarithmic, trigonometric and inverse trigonometric functions. Topics include rates of change, limits, systems of equations, conic sections, sequences and series, trigonometric equations and identities, complex number, vectors, and applications. Prerequisites/placement: Grade of C or better in Math 1220 or minimum ACCUPLACER score 249 (A&F), or math ACT score of 25+, or math SAT score of 570+. Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area 2: Mathematics and Statistics.  

MATH 1350: Introduction to Statistics. (3) This course discusses the fundamentals of descriptive and inferential statistics. Students will gain introductions to topics such as descriptive statistics, probability and basic probability models used in statistics, sampling and statistical inference, and techniques for the visual presentation of numerical data. These concepts will be illustrated by examples from a variety of fields. *MATH 1130 is NOT a prerequisite for MATH 1350. Prerequisites/placement: Successful completion of MATH 1170 or (MATH 1215X + 1215Y) or MATH 1215 or MATH 1220 or MATH 1230 or MATH 1240 or MATH 1250 or MATH 1430 or MATH 1440 or MATH 1512 or MATH 1522 or MATH 2530, or minimum ACCUPLACER score of >=262 (QRAS) or >=233 (A&F), or ACT score of >=20, or SAT score of >=520. Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area 2: Mathematics and Statistics.  

MATH 1430: Applications of Calculus I.(3) An algebraic and graphical study of derivatives and integrals, with an emphasis on applications to business, social science, economics and the sciences. Credit not allowed for both MATH 1512 and MATH 1430. Prerequisites/placement: Grade of C or higher in Math 1220 or MATH 1240 or minimum ACCUPLACER score of 249 (A&F), or math ACT score of 26+, or math SAT score of 600+. Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area 2: Mathematics and Statistics.  

MATH 1440: Applications of Calculus II.(3) Topics in this second course of Applications of Calculus include functions of several variables, techniques of integration, an introduction to basic differential equations, and other applications. Credit not allowed for both MATH 1522 and MATH 1440. Prerequisite: Grade of C or higher in Math 1430. Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area 2: Mathematics and Statistics.  

MATH 1480: Exploring Topics and Careers in Mathematics. (2) This introduction course will prepare students planning to major in Mathematics or Statistics. The course will emphasize career options, concentrations, and research and job opportunities. Activities are designed to engage students in their chosen field. Prerequisites/placement: Grade of C or higher in MATH 1230 and MATH 1240.

MATH 1512: Calculus I.(4) Introduces the intuitive, numerical and theoretical concepts of limits, continuity, differentiation and integration. Includes the study of extrema, curve sketching, and applications involving algebraic, exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric functions. Designed for mathematics, science and engineering majors. Prerequisites/placement: Grade of C or higher in MATH 1230 and MATH 1240, or ACCUPLACER score of 284-300 (A&F), or math ACT score of 28+, or math SAT score of 640+.Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area 2: Mathematics and Statistics.  

MATH 1522: Calculus II.(4) Continues course of study begun in Calculus I. Covers integration techniques, numerical integration, improper integrals, some differential equations, sequences, series and applications. Credit not allowed for both MATH 1522 and MATH 1440. Prerequisite: Grade of C or higher in Math 1512.Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area 2: Mathematics and Statistics.  

MATH 2118: Mathematics for Elementary and Middle School Teachers III.(3) Algebra from the viewpoint of the elementary curriculum with emphasis on proportional and linear relationships. Also included: data analysis and other topics with connections to the elementary curriculum. Problem solving is emphasized throughout. Prerequisite: Grade of C or higher in MATH 1118 and one of the following: MATH 1215X or MATH 1170 or other college-level mathematics course, or minimum ACCUPLACER score of >=262 (QRAS) or >=233 (A&F), or ACT score of >=20, or SAT score of >=520.Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area 2: Mathematics and Statistics.  

MATH 2140: Introduction to Numerical Computing. (3) This course introduces solutions to non-linear equations of one variable, solutions of linear equations in variables, interpolation, approximation of integration and differentiation of functions, computational solutions of initial-value problems for ordinary differential equations, and programming. Prerequisite: MATH 1522.

MATH 2420: Introduction to Linear Algebra. (3) This course is an introductory study of the analysis and application of systems of linear equations, vector spaces, matrices, and linear transformations, including computer-based linear algebra. Prerequisite: Grade of C or higher in MATH 1522.

MATH 2530: Calculus III. (4) Continuation of Calculus II, including multivariate and vector calculus, level curves and surfaces, partial derivatives, gradient, directional derivatives, tangent planes, optimization, multiple integrals in Cartesian, cylindrical and spherical coordinate systems. Prerequisite: Grade of C or higher in MATH 1522.


Mechanical Engineering (ME)

ME 217: Energy, Environment and Society (also offered as GEOG 217). (3) A look at the social, ethical, and environmental impacts of energy use in the contemporary world and throughout history. A survey of renewable energy and conservation and their impact on environmental and social systems.

 

Mechanical Technology (MCHT)

MCHT 101L: Basic Welding. (4) This course focuses on fundamental techniques in the welding field including shop safety, hand and portable power tool usage, and welding (gas welding, oxy-acetylene, stick - SMAW, MIG -GMAW, TIG - GTAW, plasma arc cutting - PAC).

 

Music (MUSC)

MUSC 1130: Music Appreciation: Western Music. (3) This course explores the ideas of music in society and its cultural relevance and is designed to increase the students’ appreciation of music as well as to enhance their listening skills. Students are introduced to various periods, styles, and composers of music and become acquainted with knowledge and appreciation of Western music from various cultures and times. Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area 7: Arts and Design.  

MUSC 2120: Major Ensemble. (1) This course is an exploration of major ensembles, allowing students to develop their abilities with their instruments in a group setting. Students will gain a broader understanding of major ensemble through study of musical history, as well as various practice exercises and performances. Open to all students; no audition required. May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 8 hours credit.


Natural Science (NTSC)

NTSC 1110: Physical Science for Teachers. (4) Introduces the science of geology, chemistry, physics and astronomy, with emphasis on the sciences processes, inquiry and the integration of technology. This course is activity based utilizing problems and issues based approach. Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences.  

NTSC 1120: Life Science for Teachers. (4) Uses activities for the study of science topics including botany, cell biology, genetics, microbiology and zoology with emphasis on science processes, inquiry and the integration of technology. Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences.

NTSC 2110: Environmental Science for Teachers. (4) Introduces major issues in environmental science with emphasis on science processes, scientific investigations and field-based activities, and the integration of technology. Course topics include current issues on population, healthy ecosystems, and natural resources. Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences.


Nursing (NMNC, NURS)

Note: NMNC and NURS courses are restricted to students in the Associate Degree in Nursing (ADN) program. Only students enrolled in the ADN program will be allowed to enroll in these courses. In addition, CPR certification is required to participate in clinical rotation of nursing courses. You must sign up for a CPR class if you are not currently certified. The CPR class must be a Health Care Providers course. Background checks are required for clinical rotations, be expected to have a background check done per the Patient Care Act. The fee may cost up to $130. Immunizations are required for all health care providers. Documentation will be required in order to go into clinical rotation. MMR, Hepatitis B vaccine, TB screening, and Varicella are all required. Students must get a physical clearing them to lift 50 lbs. in order to go into clinical rotation. Make your doctor appointments early if you are signing up for this course. Finally, Needle Stick insurance coverage is mandatory for students enrolled in the ADN program. All UNM students who are at risk for body fluid and blood-borne pathogen exposure, and coverage is for academic-related exposures only. Cost for coverage is $30.00 per semester/per student, and is subject to change. Coverage will start the first day of the semester and end the day before the first day of the next semester. Students will be required to obtain this insurance before any academic-related training will take place.

NMNC 1110: Introduction to Nursing Concepts. (3) This course introduces the nursing student to the concepts of nursing practice and conceptual learning.

NMNC 1135: Principles of Nursing Practice. (4) This course introduces the nursing student to the application of concepts through clinical skills in seminar, laboratory, and/or clinical settings. Principles of communication, assessments, safety, and interventions, including accurate calculation, measurement, and administration of medications will be included.

NMNC 1210: Health and Illness Concepts I. (3) This course will focus on health and illness concepts across the lifespan. Concepts covered are related to homeostasis/regulation, sexuality/reproductive, protection/movement, and emotional processes. Prerequisite: NURS 1110 and NURS 1135.

NMNC 1220: Health Care Participant. (3) This course introduces the nursing student to the attributes of the health care participant as an individual, a family, or a community. Prerequisite: NURS 1110 and NURS 1135.

NMNC 1230: Nursing Pharmacology. (3) This course introduces the nursing student to pharmacologic nursing practice from a conceptual approach. Prerequisite: NURS 1110 and NURS 1135.

NMNC 1235: Assessment and Health Promotion. (4) This course introduces the nursing student to the assessment of and the health promotion for the health care participant as an individual, a family, or a community. This course uses seminar, laboratory and/or clinical settings. Prerequisite: NURS 1110 and NURS 1135.

NMNC 2310: Health and Illness Concepts II. (3) This course covers health and illness concepts across the lifespan with the focus on chronic conditions. Concepts covered are related to oxygenation and hemostasis, homeostasis and regulation, protection and movement, and cognition and behavior processes. Prerequisite: NURS 1220, NURS 1235, NURS 1230, and NURS 1210.

NMNC 2320: Professional Nursing Concepts. (3) This course covers foundational concepts for professional development, including selected professional attributes and care competencies. Prerequisite: NURS 1220, NURS 1235, NURS 1230, and NURS 1210.

NMNC 2335: Care of Patients with Chronic Conditions. (4) The focus of this course is to provide safe, evidence-based nursing care for patients with chronic conditions, across the lifespan in a variety of settings. This course builds upon curricular concepts. This course is a combination of lab and clinical. Prerequisite: NURS 1220, NURS 1235, NURS 1230, and NURS 1210.

NMNC 2410: Health and Illness Concepts III. (4) This course will cover health and illness concepts, with the focus on acute conditions across the lifespan. Concepts covered are related to homeostasis/ regulation, oxygenation/ hemostasis, protection/ movement, and emotional processes. Prerequisite: NURS 2335, NURS 2310, and NURS 2320.

NMNC 2435: Clinical Intensive I. (4) This is the first of two Level Four clinical courses in which the student will apply the curricular concepts in the management of care participants with acute conditions across the lifespan. Prerequisite: NURS 2335, NURS 2310, and NURS 2320.

NMNC 2445: ADN Capstone. (2)

NURS 239: Pathophysiology I. (3) An introduction to human pathophysiology. The course focuses on forming a basic understanding of pathophysiology for nursing students.

NURS 240: Pathophysiology II. (3) This course is a continuation of Pathophysiology I. The course focuses on forming a basic understanding of Pathophysiology for nursing students.


Nursing Assistant (CNA)

CNA 101L: Nursing Assistant. (8) This course prepares students to provide patient care in a home, health care center, or hospital under the supervision of a professional health care provider (RN).  Upon successful completion of the course, students will be eligible to sit for the state of New Mexico Nurse Aide Competency Evaluation licensing examination through Prometric.  128 total clock hours; 96 hours lecture/skills lab; 32 hours clinical. Prerequisites: Satisfactory score on placement tests for writing, reading, and mathematics or completion of ENGL 100 and MATH 099 with a grade of “CR”Prior to entering the clinical setting in the final week of class, students must have completed the following requirements: American Heart Association Healthcare Provider CPR Certification; program health form signed by physician; caregiver background screening and finger printing ($73.30 fee); 10 panel illegal drug screening; immunizations to include Measles-Mumps-Rubella (MMR), Varicella (chicken pox), Hepatitis B series, Diphtheria-Pertussis-Tetanus (DPT), adult Tetanus, and Influenza (flu shot); Tuberculosis exam (TB). A UNM Certificate is awarded upon successful completion of this course.

 

Nutrition (NUTR)

NUTR 1110: Nutrition for Health. (3) This course provides an overview of general concepts of nutrition, which can be applied to food choices that support a healthy lifestyle. The cultural, psychological, physiological and economic implications of food choices are explored.

NUTR 2110: Human Nutrition. (3) This course provides an overview of nutrients, including requirements, digestion, absorption, transport, function in the body and food sources. Dietary guidelines intended to promote long-term health are stressed. Prerequisite: BIOL 1140 or BIOL 2110 and CHEM 1120 or CHEM 1215 and CHEM 1215L.


Personal Care Attendant (PCA)

PCA 101: Personal Care Attendant. (5) (Home Health Aide) Students prepare to work as a Personal Care Attendants in home healthcare, as independent contractors/self-employment, or to provide care for a relative. Course includes lectures, group learning, video instruction, workbook exercises, instructor demonstrations, hands-on skills practice and exams. 80 total clock hours; 64 hours lecture and skills lab; 16 hours job shadowing in a home healthcare or assisted living facility. Prerequisites: Satisfactory score on placement tests for writing, reading, and mathematics or completion of ENGL 100 and MATH 099 with a grade of “CR”. Prior to entering the clinical setting in the final week of class, students must have completed the following requirements: American Heart Association Healthcare Provider CPR Certification; program health form signed by physician; caregiver background screening and finger printing ($73.30 fee); 10 panel illegal drug screening; immunizations to include Measles-Mumps-Rubella (MMR), Varicella (chicken pox), Hepatitis B series, Diphtheria-Pertussis-Tetanus (DPT), adult Tetanus, and Influenza (flu shot); Tuberculosis exam (TB). A UNM Certificate is awarded upon successful completion of this course.

 

Philosophy (PHIL)

PHIL 1115: Introduction to Philosophy.(3) In this course, students will be introduced to some of the key questions of philosophy through the study of classical and contemporary thinkers. Some of the questions students might consider are: Do we have free will? What is knowledge? What is the mind? What are our moral obligations to others? Students will engage with and learn to critically assess various philosophical approaches to such questions. Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area 5: Humanities.  

PHIL 1120: Logic, Reasoning and Critical Thinking.(3) The purpose of this course is to teach students how to analyze, critique, and construct arguments. The course includes an introductory survey of important logical concepts and tools needed for argument analysis. These concepts and tools will be use to examine select philosophical and scholarly texts.

PHIL 1130: Contemporary Moral Issues. (3) This course will introduce students to and engage them in the philosophical analysis of contemporary moral issues. Students will read and discuss texts dealing with various controversial social issues, which might include health care access, physician-assisted suicide and euthanasia, the death penalty, incarceration, war, and terrorism.

PHIL 1135: Introduction to Asian Philosophies. (3) For as long as human beings have recorded their thoughts, they have shown an interest in what it means to be a human being of good character, a useful citizen within society and a fulfilled and contented person. In this course we shall examine how several thinkers from India and China have approached this problem. Some have provided anecdotes from which the reader is expected to extract an important lesson, while others have written more systematic essays or set out programs for the cultivation of virtue and guidelines of appropriate conduct. The class will combine background lectures and class discussion of assigned readings.

PHIL 2140: Professional Ethics. (3) This course focuses on some of the ethical issues that arise in the context of professional life. Beginning with an overview of several major ethical theories, the course will consider how these theories, which traditionally concern personal morality, apply to life in a professional setting. The course will focus on issues that might include lying and truth-telling, whistleblowing, confidentiality, the obligations of businesses toward the public, and the ethical concerns of privacy in journalism. Using a combination of readings, case studies, and discussion, students will explore these issues by critically evaluating ethical principles and also applying them to real-world settings.

PHIL 2210: Early Modern Philosophy. (3) This course is an introductory survey of early modern Western philosophy. Through an in-depth reading of primary source material, this course will examine the traditions of Rationalism and Empiricism that emerged during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Concepts to be discussed might include theories of knowledge and metaphysics, early modern scientific thought, and theories of the self. Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area 5: Humanities.

PHIL 2225: Greek Thought. (3) An introductory survey of early and classical Greek philosophy, literature, and history. Figures: Presocratics, Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle; Homer and Sophocles; Herodotus and Thucydides. Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area 5: Humanities.  

PHIL 2996: Topics in Philosophy. (3) May be repeated for credit as long as topics are different.


Phlebotomy Technician (PBT)

PBT 101: Phlebotomy Technician. (8) This course prepares students to become a Phlebotomy Technician. Training includes Training includes the science of venipuncture, specimen preparation, anatomy, safety, equipment maintenance, associated clerical skills, customer service and basic work skills. Upon successful completion of the course, students will be eligible to sit for the national licensing examination through the American Society for Clinical Pathology.  Prerequisites: Satisfactory score on placement tests for writing, reading, and mathematics or completion of ENGL 100 and MATH 099 with a grade of “CR”. Co-requisite: PBT 102L.Prior to entering the clinical setting in the final week of class, students must have completed the following requirements: American Heart Association Healthcare Provider CPR Certification; program health form signed by physician; caregiver background screening and finger printing ($73.30 fee); 10 panel drug screening;  immunizations to include Measles-Mumps-Rubella (MMR), Varicella (chicken pox), Hepatitis B series, Diphtheria-Pertussis-Tetanus (DPT), adult Tetanus, and Influenza (flu shot); Tuberculosis exam (TB). Needle-Stick Insurance ($30 fee) is included in the course lab fee. A UNM Certificate is awarded upon successful completion of this course.

PBT 102L: Phlebotomy Technician Clinical. (4) Clinical apprenticeship program for PBT 101. Successful completion required for credit in PBT 101L. Clinical


Physical Education (PHED)

PHED 1110: Topics in Dance. (1) Individual sections vary based on dance topic content and level of participation.

PHED 1230: Topics in Individual Sport. (1) Individual sections vary based on sport topic content and level of participation.

PHED 1310: Swim I: Beginning Swimming. (1) Designed as an introduction to the fundamentals of swimming. Emphasis is placed on learning basic swimming techniques for fun, fitness, health and personal safety. Students are introduced to and explore the various skills and techniques necessary for successful swimming.

PHED 1410: Beginning Yoga. (1) Introduction to five areas of yoga.

PHED 1420: Stretch/Relax: Stretching and Relaxation. (1) Instruction and practice of various techniques to enhance flexibility and reduce stress.

PHED 1430: Pilates. (1) Instruction in movements that increase balance, core fitness and cardiorespiratory endurance.

PHED 1440: T'ai Chi. (1) Introduces the practice and philosophy of Tai Chi. Students will use breathing, alignment, precise body mechanics and soft, graceful movements to develop their understanding of the practice.

PHED 1510: Training: Resistance Training. (1) Individual training programs for development of general strength, tone, endurance, and weight control.

PHED 1620: Fitness. (1) A class to develop and experience a deeper awareness of a person's body and its capabilities.

PHED 1710: Topics in Martial Arts. (1) Individual sections vary based on martial arts topic content and level of participation.

PHED 1830: Running for Fitness. (1) Individualized running programs for improved cardio‑respiratory endurance.

PHED 1910: Outdoor Experience: Archery. (1) Instruction in the basic skills and knowledge of range archery.

PHED 2110: Topics in Dance II (1) Second level of course. Individual sections vary based on dance topic content and level of participation.

PHED 2230: Topics in Individual Sport II. (1) Second level of course. Individual sections vary based on sport topic content and level of participation.

PHED 2410: Intermediate Yoga. (1) Instruction in more advanced techniques of Yoga.

PHED 2510: Training II: Intermediate Weight Training. (1) Instruction in advanced weight-lifting principles and techniques as well as fitness related topics.

PHED 2710: Topics in Martial Arts II. (1) Second level of course. Individual sections vary based on martial arts topic content and level of participation.

PHED 2996: Topics in Physical Education. (1-2) May be repeated for credit, as long as content is different.


Physics (PHYS)

PHYS 1230: Algebra-Based Physics I. (3) An algebra-based treatment of Newtonian mechanics. Topics include kinematics and dynamics in one and two dimensions, conservation of energy and momentum, rotational motion, equilibrium, and fluids. Prerequisite: Successful completion of MATH 1240 or MATH 1250 or MATH 1512 or MATH 1430 or ACCUPLACER score of 284-300 (A&F) or math ACT score of 28+, or math SAT score of 640-699. Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences.

PHYS 1230L: Algebra-Based Physics I Laboratory.(1) A series of laboratory experiments associated with the material presented in PHYS 1230. Pre or co-requisite: PHYS 1230. Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences.

PHYS 1240: Algebra-Based Physics II.(3) The second half of a two semester algebra-based introduction to Physics. This course covers electricity, magnetism and optics. Prerequisite: PHYS 1230. Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences.

PHYS 1240L: Algebra-Based Physics II Laboratory. (1) A series of laboratory experiments associated with the material presented in PHYS 1240. Pre or co-requisite: PHYS 1240.Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences.

PHYS 1310: Calculus-Based Physics I. (3) A calculus level treatment of classical mechanics and waves, which is concerned with the physical motion concepts, forces, energy concepts, momentum, rotational motion, angular momentum, gravity, and static equilibrium. Pre or co-requisite: MATH 1512. Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences.

PHYS 1310L: Calculus-Based Physics I Laboratory. (1) A series of laboratory experiments associated with the material presented in Calculus-based Physics I. Pre or co-requisite: PHYC 1310. Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences.

PHYS 1320: Calculus-Based Physics II. (3) A calculus level treatment of classical electricity and magnetism. Prerequisite: PHYC 1310. Pre or co-requisite: MATH 1522. Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences.

PHYS 1320L: Calculus-Based Physics II Laboratory. (1) A series of Laboratory experiments associated with the material presented in Calculus-Based Physics II. Pre or co-requisite: PHYC 1320. Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences.

        

Political Science (POLS)

POLS 1120: American National Government.(3) This course explains the role of American national government, its formation and principles of the Constitution; relation of state to the national government; political parties and their relationship to interest groups. This course also explains the structure of the legislative, executive, and judicial branches. Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area 4: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

POLS 1140: The Political World.(3) This course introduces politics with emphasis on the ways people can understand their own political systems and those of others in a greater depth. This course will help in becoming more responsible and effective in the political world. Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area 4: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

POLS 2110: Comparative Politics (3). This course introduces comparative politics by examining the political history, social and economic structures, and contemporary political institutions and behavior, with focus on occurrences in countries representing diverse cultures, geographies, and levels of development. Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area 4: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

POLS 2120: International Relations. (3). This course covers the analysis of significant factors in world politics, including nationalism, national interest, political economy, ideology, international conflict and collaboration, balance of power, deterrence, international law, and international organization. Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area 4: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

POLS 2130: Political Ideas. (3) This course offers an introductory survey of political theory. Emphasis is placed on textual analysis of primary sources and on scholarly analysis of the foundational questions and methods central to the academic study of political ideas.

POLS 2140: Introduction to Political Analysis. (3) The goal of this course is to introduce students to the scientific process by political scientists. The interpretation and analysis of data is also essential for almost any career that a political science major might pursue. 

POLS 2150: Public Policy and Administration. (3) The objective of this introductory course in public policy and public administration is to provide students with a basic understanding of the ways that government deals with problems affecting society.

POLS 2996: Topics in Political Science. (3) Course may be repeated for credit as long as topics are different.

 

Psychology (PSYC)

PSYC 1110: Introduction to Psychology.(3) This course will introduce students to the concepts, theories, significant findings, methodologies, and terminology that apply to the field of psychology. Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area 4: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

PSYC 2110: Social Psychology. (3) This course is an introduction to the scientific study of human social influence and interaction, and explores how an individual’s actions, emotions, attitudes and thought processes are influenced by society and other individuals. Prerequisite: PSY 1110.

PSYC 2120: Developmental Psychology. (3) Study of human physical and psychological change and stability from a lifespan development perspective. Prerequisite: PSY 1110.

PSYC 2220: Cognitive Psychology. (3) The course provides an overview of human cognitive processes such as attention, perception, memory, language, categorization, decision-making, reasoning, and problem solving. Includes methods, theories, and applications. Prerequisite: PSY 1110.

PSYC 2221: Applied Psychology. (3) Explanation of the psychological principles of everyday living. Emphasizes motivation, learning of intelligent behavior, and applications of psychology to social issues.

PSYC 2250: Brain and Behavior. (3) A general survey of the biological foundations of behavior and mental processes. Students will gain an understanding of anatomy, physiology, and chemistry of the nervous system and their relationships to human behavior. Prerequisite: PSY 1110, or BIOL 1110, or BIOL 1140.

PSYC 2320: Health Psychology. (3) This course examines how biological, psychological, and social factors interact with and affect different areas within health. Course will cover the role of stress in illness, coping with illness, pain management, and the role of health behavior in health and disease. Prerequisite: PSY 1110.

PSYC 2330: Psychology of Human Sexuality. (3). Exploration of the psychological, physiological, cultural, social and individual factors that influence sexual behavior, sex roles, and sex identity. Prerequisite: PSY 1110.

PSYC 2996: Topics in Psychology. (3) May be repeated for credit as long as the topic is different.

 

Religious Studies (RELG)

RELG 1110: Introduction to World Religions. (3) This course introduces major world religions and the scholarly methods of the academic study of religion. Religions covered may include Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Daoism, Judaism, Christianity, Islam and/or new religious movements. Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area 5: Humanities.

 

Signed Language (SIGN)

SIGN 2125: Introduction to Signed Language. (3) Overview of signed language studies and related issues. Introduction to American Sign Language (ASL); signed communication systems most frequently used by deaf and hard of hearing individuals; the study of fingerspelling. Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum – Area 6: Second Language.

 

Sociology (SOCI)

SOCI 1110: Introduction to Sociology.(3) This course will introduce students to the basic concepts and theories of sociology, as well as to the methods utilized in sociological research. The course will address how sociological concepts and theories can be utilized to analyze and interpret our social world, and how profoundly our society and the groups to which students belong influence them. Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area 4: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

SOCI 2120: Introduction to the Criminal Justice System. (3) This course provides an introduction to social issues that are currently affecting the criminal justice system in the United States. The course will cover the history of the US criminal justice system and how our system compares with other countries. We will address how the U.S. criminal justice system attempts to create and preserve a balance between sustaining order, maintaining individual rights, and promoting justice. Prerequisite: SOC 1110.

SOCI 2210: Sociology of Deviance. (3) This course is designed to provide an overview of the study of deviance and social control from multiple sociological perspectives. The instructor will present how sociologists research deviance and social control and the ethical issues involved in studying human subjects involved in these activities. The course also examines central sociological theories for understanding the causes of deviant behavior. Prerequisite: SOC 1110.

SOCI 2310: Contemporary Social Problems. (3) This course studies the nature, scope, and effects of social problems and their solutions. The course will concentrate on sociological perspectives, theories, and key concepts when investigating problems, such as inequality, poverty, racism, alienation, family life, sexuality, gender, urbanization, work, aging, crime, war and terrorism, environmental degradation, and mass media. Prerequisite: SOC 1110.

SOCI 2315: The Dynamics of Prejudice. (3) This course is designed to help students understand how attitudes and beliefs of individuals shape intergroup relations and their impacts on the daily lives of individuals as well as the effects that these beliefs have on the larger social structure of American society. Prerequisite: SOC 1110. Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area 5: Humanities.

SOCI 2340: Global Issues. (3) This course offers a sociological perspective on this phenomenon of globalization and explores its origins in the culture of capitalism. To this end, we will examine topics such as consumption, labor, migration and immigration, economic inequality, the natural environment, and health. We will also consider various ways in which these problems can, or cannot, be solved for us and for future generations.


Spanish (SPAN)

SPAN 1110: Spanish I. (3) Designed for students with little exposure to Spanish, this course develops basic listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills and basic intercultural competence in interpretive, interpersonal and presentational modes of communication at the Novice Level of proficiency based on ACTFL guidelines. Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area 6: Second Language.

SPAN 1120: Spanish II.(3) Designed for students with some degree of exposure to Spanish in high school and/or at home, this course continues to develop basic listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills and basic intercultural competence in interpretive, interpersonal and presentational modes of communication based at the Novice High Level of proficiency based on ACTFL guidelines, although a few abilities may emerge in the Intermediate Low Level. Students in this course communicate in Spanish in familiar topics using a variety of words, phrases, simple sentences and questions that have been highly practiced and memorized. Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area 6: Second Language.

SPAN 1125: Conversational Spanish I. (1) This third-semester Spanish course emphasizes oral communication, idiomatic usage and the development of vocabulary, with a review of basic syntax. Grade option: CR/NC. Pre or co-requisite: SPAN 1110 or SPAN 1120.

SPAN 1210: Spanish for Heritage Learners I. (3) This is a beginning-level Spanish course designed for students who have a cultural connection to the Spanish language. Some students have had very little exposure to the language and enter the class to develop beginning-level skills. Other students may have grown up hearing the heritage language in the community and may understand some Spanish and speak at a basic level as a result. The objective is to draw upon the connection to the heritage language as a source of motivation and engagement for our learning communities.

SPAN 1220: Spanish for Heritage Learners II. (3) Spanish as a Heritage Language II is a second semester class designed for students who have developed some basic Spanish proficiency from previous classes and/or from community experiences. This course provides students with the opportunity to develop their proficiency in the four language skills (speaking, listening, reading, and writing). Class activities are designed to strengthen oral communication skills (speaking and listening) through a variety of group activities.

Span 2110: Spanish III.(3) This course is based on the integration of learning outcomes across Interpersonal, Interpretive, and Presentational Modes of Communication at the Intermediate Low Level of proficiency based on ACTFL guidelines. Students accomplish real-world communicative tasks in culturally appropriate ways as they gain familiarity with the target culture(s). Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area 6: Second Language.

Span 2120: Spanish IV.(3) This course is based on the integration of learning outcomes across Interpersonal, Interpretive, and Presentational Modes of Communication at the Intermediate High Level of proficiency based on ACTFL guidelines. Students accomplish real-world communicative tasks in culturally appropriate ways as they gain familiarity with the target culture(s). Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum Area 6: Second Language.

SPAN 2125: Conversational Spanish II. (3) A conversational Spanish course designed for the "intermediate" level student. The course provides intensive conversation practice and a review of selected grammar items. It emphasizes vocabulary expansion and enhancement. Pre- or co-requisite: SPAN 2110, SPAN 2120, SPAN 2210.

SPAN 2210: Spanish for Heritage Learners III. (3) Intermediate Spanish for Heritage Speakers I is a third semester course designed for students who have been raised in a Spanish-speaking environment and speak, or understand, some Spanish as a result of hearing it in the home, and in the community by family, friends, and neighbors.

SPAN 2220: Spanish for Heritage Learners IV. (3) Intermediate Spanish for Heritage Speakers II is a fourth-semester course designed for students who have been raised in a Spanish-speaking environment and speak, or understand, Spanish as a result of having heard it in the home and in the community. It is also for students with a cultural connection to heritage language speech communities or who have achieved proficiency from study in previous courses.


Welding (WLDT)

WLDT 101: Blue Print Reading. (4) An introductory course on welding blue print reading and related theory. Students will demonstrate competency by satisfactory completion of instruction modules and American Welding Society Standards. Course combines lecture and laboratory.

WLDT 105: Arc Welding I. (4) This course will introduce the student to the process of electrode manipulation, position welding and the use of different welding machines.

WLDT 107: Advanced Arc Welding. (4) Students will learn V-groove welds and how to set up welding equipment for making open V-groove welds. The course provides procedures for making flat, horizontal, vertical and overhead open V-groove welds.

WLDT 108: Oxyacetylene Welding. (4) This course will introduce the student to the gas welding process. The student will learn to handle and use the acetylene gas form of welding.

WLDT 130: Pipe Welding. (4) This course utilizes advanced Arc and oxyacetylene welding skills and techniques on ferrous pipe in a rotating and/or a fixed position. Emphasis is placed on the open groove pipe joint. The course will include alignment techniques, oxyacetylene cutting of pipe, pre-heat interpass temperatures, and mechanical preparation of the joints.

WLDT 142: M.I.G. Welding (4) This course is designed to further the knowledge and skills of welders. The course begins with a short review of pipe welding and groove welds on plate in all positions and covers stainless steel, cupro nickel alloys, hard processes, and gas metal arc welding or MIG advanced uses.   This course will cover equipment set up on GMAW. Students will learn tempering and hardening of steels and process of welding of stainless steel and aluminum.

WLDT 143: T.I.G. Welding (4) This course is designed to further the knowledge and skills of welders. The course begins with a short review of pipe welding and groove welds on plate in all positions and covers stainless steel, cupro nickel alloys, hard processes, and gas tungsten arc welding or TIG advanced uses.   This course will cover equipment set up on GTAW. Students will learn tempering and hardening of steels and process of welding of stainless steel and aluminum.

WLDT 201: Welding Metallurgy Math and Communication. (4) Students will study metallurgy, math and communication skills for welding technology.