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Course Descriptions


Anthropology (ANTH)

ANTH 101: Introduction to Anthropology. (3) Surveys the breadth of anthropology, introducing students to archeology, biological anthropology, ethnology, human evolutionary ecology, and linguistics. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum (NMCC) Area IV: Social/Behavioral Sciences. Meets University of New Mexico Core Curriculum (UNMCC) Area 4: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

ANTH 110: Language, Culture, and the Human Animal. (3) Fundamentals of anthropological linguistics. The biological, structural, psychological, and social nature of language; implications for cross-cultural theory, research, and applications.

ANTH 121L: Archeological Methods and Theory. (4) Introduction to archeological methods and theory. Lectures cover basic concepts and strategy. Labs provide hands-on experience with methods of analyzing archeological remains.

ANTH 130: Cultures of the World. (3) Basic concepts and methods of cultural anthropology. Selected cultures, ranging from preliterate societies to aspects of urban civilization. Meets NMCC Area IV: Social/Behavioral Sciences. Meets UNMCC Area 4: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

ANTH 134: Creating a Sustainable Future: Introduction to Environmental, Social, and Economic Health. (3) Also offered as AMST 134, SUST 134. An introduction to creating a sustainable future that supports environmental health and restoration, social equity, and economic vitality. Examines challenges and examples of integrated, creative strategies on local, regional, national, and global levels.

ANTH 150: Evolution and Human Emergence. (3) Fundamentals of biological anthropology and principles of organic evolution, in relation to the biology, ecology and behavior of primates and fossil humans. Biological anthropology concentrators are required, and others are encouraged, to enroll concurrently in 151L.

ANTH 151L: Human Evolution Laboratory. (2) The factual basis of human evolution, from the comparative study of living and fossil primates to interpretation of recent human fossils. Recommended, but not required, that this be taken concurrently with 150.

ANTH 160: Human Life Course. (3) Biology and behavior of the human life course, including the evolution of the life history patterns specific to humans and the impact of population growth and of adaptation to local conditions in promoting human diversity. Students are encouraged, but not required, to enroll concurrently in ANTH 161L.

ANTH 161L: Computer Laboratory in Human Evolutionary Ecology. (2) Introduces the computer as a tool in biological and social science research, provides first-hand experience in data collection, analysis and modeling behavior. No prior computer experience required. Pre- or co-requisite: ANTH 160.

ANTH 220: World Archaeology. (3) Illustrated lecture survey of the development of human culture from its Stone Age origins through the inception of complex societies worldwide.

ANTH 230: Topics in Current Anthropology. (3) Experimental courses on topics of current interest. May be repeated for credit, since subject matter varies by term.

ANTH 238: Cultures of the Southwest. (3) Basic concepts of cultural anthropology, illustrated with overviews of social and cultural patterns of Southwest Indians and Hispanics. Interethnic relations of these with other American populations.

ANTH 251: Forensic Anthropology. (3) This course is designed to introduce students to the forensic investigation of death. Emphasis will be on current methods and techniques and include the role of the anthropologist as an integral member of the investigation process.

Art History (ARTH)

ARTH 101: Introduction to Art. (3) A beginning course in the fundamental concepts of the visual arts; the language of form; and the mediums of artistic expression. Readings and slide lectures supplemented by museum exhibition attendance. Suggested prerequisite: ENGL 101. Meets UNMCC – Area 7: Fine Arts; meets NMCC – Area V: Humanities and Fine Arts.

ARTH 201: History of Art I. (3) Prehistoric, Near Eastern, Egyptian, Greek, Roman, Early Christian, Byzantine, Romanesque and Gothic Art. Suggested prerequisite: ENGL 101. Meets UNMCC – Area 7: Fine Arts; meets NMCC – Area V: Humanities and Fine Arts.

ARTH 202: History of Art II. (3) Western art from Early Renaissance to Impressionism. Suggested prerequisite: ENGL 101. Meets UNMCC – Area 7: Fine Arts; meets NMCC – Area V: Humanities and Fine Arts.

ARTH 210: History of Photography. (3) A survey tracing the historical and cultural impact of photography, including artistic, scientific, documentary, commercial, and vernacular images. 

Art Studio (ARTS)

ARTS 106: Drawing I. (3) Basic drawing concepts, including the expressive use of contour, value, perspective and composition while exploring both dry and wet media. Assigned problems may include still life, landscape, portraiture or the figure. Suggested co-requisite: ARTH 101. Meets UNMCC – Area 7: Fine Arts.

ARTS 125: Arts Practices I. (3) This is an interdisciplinary course, exploring the thematic concepts and diverse media that are central to the nature of art-making today. Art Practices I will investigate issues of Light, Frame, and Mark. Particular attention will be placed on a disciplined approach toward design and development of perceptual skills. Suggested co-requisite: ARTH 101. Meets UNMCC – Area 7: Fine Arts.

ARTS 126: Arts Practices II. (3) This is an interdisciplinary course, exploring the thematic concepts and diverse media that are central to the nature of art-making today. Art Practices II will investigate issues of Motive and Change. Particular attention will be placed on traditional and contemporary approaches to sculpture through the consideration of spatial concepts and making three-dimensional objects. Suggested co-requisite: ARTH 101. Meets UNMCC – Area 7: Fine Arts.

ARTS 130: Introduction to Electronic Art. (3) Introduction to the computer as a medium and fine art tool. Course will explore history, theory and contemporary art issues associated with computer-based art practice, as well as introducing students to basic tools and technologies. Meets UNMCC – Area 7: Fine Arts.

ARTS 168: Introduction to Ceramics. (3) Comprehensive introduction to the terms, concepts, historical, and technical information that support creative development. Includes hand building and throwing, basic clay bodies, slip and glaze, oxidation, reduction, and atmospheric firing. Suggested co-requisites: ARTS 106, ARTS 126. Meets UNMCC – Area 7: Fine Arts.

ARTS 187: Introduction to Photography. (3) Hands-on course introducing students to the basic techniques of digital, black and white, and color photography. Suggested co-requisite: ARTS 125. Meets UNMCC – Area 7: Fine Arts.

ARTS 188: Visualizing Ideas Using Photography. (3) This course will help students use photography to develop their ideas conceptually. Students will work in both a traditional and an experimental manner with a variety of photographic processes and technologies to advance the visual presentation of their ideas.

ARTS 205: Drawing II. (3) Further concentration on basic drawing concepts with a greater emphasis on descriptive and perceptual drawing skills using both dry and wet media. Assigned problems explore aspects of still life, landscape, portraiture and/or the figure. Prerequisites: ARTS 106, ARTS 125. Meets UNMCC – Area 7: Fine Arts.

ARTS 207: Painting I. (3) Painting materials and techniques, integrating basic drawing concepts with color theory and composition. Emphasis on descriptive and perceptual skills through assigned problems. Prerequisites: ARTS 106, ARTS 125; suggested co- or prerequisite: ARTS 205. Meets UNMCC – Area 7: Fine Arts.

ARTS 208: Painting II. (3-6) Continued exploration of the painting concepts and techniques, presented in ARTS 207. Working from imagination as well as observation, emphasizing the expressive potential of the medium. Prerequisite: ARTS 207. Meets UNMCC – Area 7: Fine Arts.

ARTS 213: Sculpture I. (3) A further exploration into the concepts presented in Three-Dimensional Design. Will investigate, through specific assignments, issues that are central to producing sculpture. Prerequisite: ARTS 126. Meets UNMCC – Area 7: Fine Arts.

ARTS 231: Video Art I. (3) An investigation of video as a medium within a fine art context. Course will explore history, theory, and contemporary art issues associated with video art practice as well as develop student's mastery of technical skills. Prerequisite: ARTS 130.Meets UNMCC – Area 7: Fine Arts.

ARTS 232: Sound Art I. (3) An investigation of sound as a medium within a Fine Arts context. Course will explore history, theory, and contemporary arts issues associated with sound art intended to develop student skills in sound editing/recording technology. Prerequisite:ARTS 130.Meets UNMCC – Area 7: Fine Arts.

ARTS 268: Ceramics II. (3-6) Continuation of ARTS 168 with emphasis placed on the mastery of forming, surfacing, and firing processes, expanded critical awareness, and the development of a personal aesthetic. Open-ended and self-selected projects. Individual and group critiques. May be repeated for credit if subject matter varies. Prerequisites: ARTS 126 and ARTS 168. Meets UNMCC – Area 7: Fine Arts.

ARTS 274: Introduction to Printmaking. (3) Exploration of printmaking concepts and fundamental techniques, including monotype, monoprint, intaglio, lithography, woodcut linoleum cut, collagraph, and curatorial technique. Instruction includes lecture, demonstration, and critique. Prerequisites: ARTS 106, ARTS 125. Meets UNMCC – Area 7: Fine Arts.

ARTS 289: Digital Imaging Techniques. (3) Techniques and aesthetics of digital imaging using a variety of software programs and hardware. Prerequisite: ARTS 187. Meets UNMCC – Area 7: Fine Arts.

Astronomy (ASTR)

ASTR 101: Introduction to Astronomy. (3) Conceptual description of our fascinating universe: early astronomy, Newtonian, synthesis, Earth, Moon, planets, asteroids, comets, the Sun, our solar system, stars, black holes, galaxies, dark matter, dark energy and cosmological mysteries. Meets UNMCC – Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences; meets NMCC– Area III: Laboratory Science.

ASTR 101L: Astronomy Laboratory. (1) Intended as an adjunct to ASTR 101, this course deals with elementary techniques in astronomical observations. Pre or co-requisite: ASTR 101. Meets UNMCC – Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences; meets NMCC– Area III: Laboratory Science.

Automotive Technology (AUTT)

AUTT 101: Introduction to Automotive Technology. (3) Designed to expose the student to the automotive industry, its tools, and its specific language. The student will receive an overview in the basic systems related to automotive technology, and appropriate safety measures.

AUTT 111: Automotive Testing and Diagnosis. (4) Intended to give the student a background in testing and diagnosis of electronic, electrical and fuel systems found in current automobiles.

AUTT 115: Brake Systems. (4) The study of modern brake theory including drum and disk-type brakes. Mechanical and hydraulic principles as they pertain to brakes will be covered.

AUTT 130: Electrical System Repair. (4) Electrical theory and diagnosis. Starting, charging, lighting, and related electrical systems in automotive applications will be studied.

AUTT 157: Steering and Suspension. (6) A detailed study of steering and suspension components and their repair and alignment.

AUTT 167: Emission Control Service. (3) To familiarize the student with various emission control devices, including functions, diagnosis, repair, and/or service.

AUTT 170: Heating and Air Conditioning.(4) Basic heating and air conditioning of an automotive system.

AUTT 203: Automotive Engine Overhaul.(4) Repair and overhaul procedure performed on a gas engine.

AUTT 210: Drive Train Overhaul.(6) Repair and overhaul of drive train components such as clutch, manual transmission, transfer case and differentials found on 2-wheel, 4-wheel, and front wheel drive vehicles.

AUTT 213: Automotive Transmission Overhaul.(4) Basic transmission and overhaul of an automotive system.

AUTT 230: Electrical System Overhaul. (3) To review basic electrical theory and learn the testing and overhaul procedures for electrical system components.

AUTT 295: Practicum in Auto Technology. (3-9) The student will work in a garage or training facility in the Valencia County area and at the same time will be attending the college during part of the day. (May be repeated in subsequent terms for a maximum of 9 cr.)

Biology (BIOL)

BIOL 110: Biology for Non-Majors. (3) Biological principles important for the non-scientist in today’s world. Ecological, evolutionary and molecular topics. Credit not allowed for both BIOL 110 and BIOL 123/124L; not accepted toward Biology major. Meets UNMCC – Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences; meets NMCC– Area III: Laboratory Science.

BIOL 112L: Biology Laboratory for Non-Majors. (1) An optional laboratory that may be taken concurrently with or subsequent to BIOL 110. Lab: One three-hour lab per week including plant and animal diversity, techniques and investigation of current issues. Pre or co-requisite: BIOL 110. Meets UNMCC – Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences; meets NMCC– Area III: Laboratory Science.

BIOL 123: Biology for Health-Related Sciences and Non-Majors. (3) Principles of cell biology, genetics, and organismic biology. Credit not allowed for both BIOL 123 and BIOL 110; not accepted toward Biology major. BIOL 123 is available via dual credit. Meets UNMCC – Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences; meets NMCC– Area III: Laboratory Science.

BIOL 124L: Biology for Health-Related Sciences and Non-Majors Lab. (1) One credit optional laboratory to accompany BIOL123. Pre or co-requisite: BIOL 123. BIOL 124L is available via dual credit. Meets UNMCC – Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences; meets NMCC– Area III: Laboratory Science.

BIOL 201L: Molecular and Cell Biology. (4) The scientific method, the role of water in cell biology, carbon and molecular diversity, macromolecules, introduction to metabolism, tour of cell structures and functions, membrane structure and function, cellular respiration, photosynthesis, cell communication, and the cell cycle. Three lectures, one discussion section. Credit not allowed for both BIOL 201 and BIOL 219. Pre or co-requisite: CHEM 121 and CHEM 123L OR AP Chemistry score of 3 or higher.

BIOL 202L: Genetics. (4) Mitosis, meiosis, Mendelian genetics, chromosomes and inheritance, molecular basis of inheritance, genes to proteins, genetic models (viruses and bacteria), eukaryotic genomes, genetic basis of development and overview of genomes. Three lectures, one discussion section. Credit not allowed for both BIOL 202L and BIOL 221. Prerequisite: BIOL 201L and CHEM 121 or CHEM 131L. Prerequisite or Co-requisite: CHEM 122 or CHEM 132L. 

BIOL 203: Ecology and Evolution. (3) Darwinian principles, origin of the earth, the fossil record and diversification of ancient life, evolution of populations, origin of species, phylogenetics, introduction to ecology and the biosphere, behavioral ecology, population ecology, community ecology, ecosystem ecology, and conservation biology. Prerequisites: BIOL 202L, CHEM 122 and CHEM 124L. Pre or co-requisite: BIOL 203L, and (MATH 162 or MATH 180).

BIOL 203L: Ecology and Evolution Laboratory. (1) Material includes a survey of the diversity of life. Pre or co-requisite: BIOL 203.

BIOL 204: Plant and Animal Form and Function. (3) Introduction to plant systems including: structure, growth, transport, nutrition, reproduction, development, and control systems. Introduction to animal systems including: nutrition, circulation, reproduction, development; and immune, control and nervous systems. Prerequisites: BIOL 203 and BIOL 203L, CHEM 122 and CHEM 124L. Pre or co-requisite: BIOL 204L and (MATH 162 or MATH 180).

BIOL 204L: Plant and Animal Form and Function Laboratory. (1) Laboratory for BIOL 204. Pre or co-requisite: BIOL 204.

BIOL 237: Human Anatomy and Physiology I for the Health Sciences. (3) An integrated study of human structure and function to include histology, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems. Lecture: 3 hours. BIOL 123/124L and CHEM 111L are available via dual credit. Prerequisites: BIOL 123/124L or BIOL201L and CHEM 111L or CHEM 121.

BIOL 238: Human Anatomy and Physiology II for the  Health Sciences. (3) A continuation of BIOL 237 to include cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, excretory, reproductive, and endocrine systems. Lecture: 3 hours. Prerequisites: BIOL 237.

BIOL 239: Microbiology for Health Sciences and Non-Majors. (4) Introduction to microbiology with emphasis on principles of infection and immunity. Not accepted toward a biology major. Lecture: 3 hours; lab: 3 hours. Credit not allowed for both BIOL 239L and BIOL 351 and BIOL 352L. Prerequisites: BIOL 123/124L or BIOL 201 and CHEM 111L or CHEM 121 and CHEM 123L. 

BIOL 247L: Human Anatomy and Physiology Laboratory I. (3) Laboratory work using cadavers. Anatomy stressed with appropriate physiological work. Topics integrated with BIOL 237. Lab: 3 hours. Pre or co-requisite: BIOL 237. 

BIOL 248L: Human Anatomy and Physiology Laboratory II. (3) Continuation of BIOL 247L. Topics integrated with BIOL 238. Lab: 3 hours. Pre or co-requisite: BIOL 247

BIOL 299: Topics in Biology. (1-4) Transferable to the UNM Biology Department as an elective.

Business Management (MGMT)

MGMT 101: Fundamentals of Accounting I. (3) The development of the accounting cycle, special journals, and financial statements. Suggested co-requisite: MGMT 101L.

MGMT 101L: Fundamentals of Accounting I Lab. (1) To provide additional problem solving necessary for the students to master accounting basics. Suggested co-requisite: MGMT 101.

MGMT 102: Fundamentals of Accounting II. (3) Continuation of MGMT 101, including corporation and manufacturing accounting and decision-making. Prerequisite: MGMT 101. Suggested co-requisite: MGMT 102L.

MGMT 102L: Fundamentals of Accounting II Lab. (1) To provide additional problem solving necessary for students to master accounting basics. Suggested co-requisite: MGMT 102.

MGMT 113: Management: An Introduction. (3) Modern concepts of organizations and their management. An overview of functional activities within business and other organizations. Suggested prerequisite: MATH 120.

MGMT 116: Human Relations in Business. (3) Designed to acquaint the student with human relations in business and the psychological implications of modern business practices as they apply to individual employees and supervisors.

Chemistry (CHEM)

CHEM 101: Chemistry in Our Community. (3) Introduction for non-science majors to the basic chemistry required to understand scientific topics affecting our community, such as global warming, acid rain, nuclear power, plastics, drugs, and genetic engineering.

CHEM 111: Elements of General Chemistry. (4) One-semester course in general chemistry, especially for non-science majors in the health sciences except pre-medicine and medical terminology. Credit not allowed for both CHEM 111 and CHEM 121L. CHEM 111 is available via dual credit. Prerequisite: ACT =>22 or SAT =>510 or MATH 103 or MATH 121 or MATH 150 or MATH 162 or MATH 163 or MATH 180 or MATH 181 or MATH 264. Meets UNMCC – Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences; meets NMCC – Area III: Laboratory Science.

CHEM 115: Preparation for Chemistry. (2) A preparatory course for students who feel they are not prepared or who do not have the prerequisite requirements for CHEM 121/123L. A grade of "CR" can be used as a placement into CHEM 121/123L. Offered on a CR/NC (credit/non-credit) basis only.

CHEM 120: Foundations of Chemistry. (3) This course is available to students initially enrolled in CHEM 121 who find themselves unprepared. Designed for science majors, it provides foundational chemical concepts and prepares students to return and succeed in CHEM 121.

CHEM 121: General Chemistry I. (3) Introduction to the chemical and physical behavior of matter. Lecture: 3 hours. Credit not allowed for both CHEM 111L and CHEM 121L. Prerequisite: MATH 121 or MATH 123 or MATH 150 or MATH 162 or MATH 163 or MATH 180 or MATH 181 or MATH 264 or with a grade of C or higher or a math placement score that qualifies the student for. Co-requisite: CHEM 123L. Suggested prerequisite: CHEM 111L.Meets UNMCC – Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences; meets NMCC– Area III: Laboratory Science.

CHEM 122: General Chemistry II. (3) Continuation of CHEM 121L. Lecture: 3 hours. Co-requisite: CHEM 124L. Prerequisite: CHEM 121 and CHEM 123L or CHEM 131L with a grade of C or higher; ACT =>25 or SAT =>570 or MATH 121 or MATH 123 or MATH 150 or MATH 162 or MATH 163 or MATH 180 or MATH 181 or MATH 264.Meets UNMCC – Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences; meets NMCC– Area III: Laboratory Science.

CHEM 123L: General Chemistry I Laboratory. (1) Introduction to basic chemical laboratory principles and techniques. Lab: 3 hours. Prerequisite: MATH 121 or MATH 123 or MATH 150 or MATH 162 or MATH 163 or MATH 180 or MATH 181 or MATH 264. Co-requisite: CHEM 121. Meets UNMCC – Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences; meets NMCC– Area III: Laboratory Science.

CHEM 124L: General Chemistry II Laboratory. (1) Experiments illustrating the fundamental principles and techniques of chemistry. Lab: 3 hours. Prerequisite: ACT Math =>25 or SAT Math =>570 or MATH 121 or MATH 123 or MATH 150 or MATH 162 or MATH 163 or MATH 180 or MATH 181 or MATH 264 or CHEM 121 and CHEM 123L. Co-requisite: CHEM 122. Meets UNMCC – Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences; meets NMCC– Area III: Laboratory Science.

CHEM 212: Integrated Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry. (4) Survey interrelating the major principles of organic chemistry and biochemistry with special emphasis toward interests of students in the health sciences. Prerequisite: CHEM 111L or CHEM 122.

Communication & Journalism (CJ)

CJ 101: Introduction to Communication. (3) Principles and concepts of various types of human communication, including interpersonal, small group, organizational, public and mass communications.

CJ 101L: Introduction to Communication Lab. (1) Principles and concepts of various types of human communication, including interpersonal, small group, organizational, public and mass communication.

CJ 110: Introduction to Mass Communication. (3) Also offered as MA 110. The development of the mass media with emphasis on television in the areas of programming, policy, regulations, economics and technology. Examination of the social, cultural, and political impact of the mass media on contemporary society. Suggested prerequisite: ENGL 110.

CJ 115: Communication Across Cultures. (3) An introduction to communication among people from different cultural backgrounds, emphasizing intercultural relations. This course seeks to identify, honor and enhance the strengths of different cultural perspectives. Suggested prerequisite: ENGL 100.

CJ 130: Public Speaking. (3) A performance course that deals with the analysis, preparation, and presentation of speeches. Suggested prerequisite: ENGL 110. Meets UNMCC – Area 1: Writing and Speaking; meets NMCC– Area I: Communications.

CJ 171: Introduction to Media Writing. (3) Practical introduction to journalism, emphasizing journalistic conventions and the gathering and writing of news for the print and broadcast media. Language and typing skills required. Prerequisites: 15 credit hours earned, 2.0 minimum GPA, ENGL 120.

CJ 220: Communication for Teachers. (3) Concepts and practices of interpersonal, small group and public communication pertinent to classroom teachers at the elementary, middle, and secondary levels of education.

CJ 221: Interpersonal Communication. (3) Analysis of a variety of interpersonal communication concepts with special emphasis on the application of communication skills in different situations. Meets NMCC– Area I: Communications.

CJ 225: Small Group Communication. (3) Basic characteristics and patterns of communication in small groups. Includes attention to role theory, conflict resolution, and creative decision-making methods. Meets NMCC– Area I: Communications.

Computer-Aided Drafting (CADT)

CADT 150: Introduction to Computer Aided Drafting. (3) This course is designed for students interested in developing computer-aided drafting skills. It consists of both lecture and system operation assignments. Lecture/lab. Prerequisite: Approval of the instructor.

CADT 160: Introduction to AutoDesk Revit. (4) An introductory course to building information modeling. The basic features of Autodesk’s REVIT software will be covered. Lecture/lab.

CADT 171: Computer Modeling for 3D Printing. (4) The purpose of this course is to introduce students to 3D printing software. Students will learn how to make 3D models using Sketchup, Autodesk's 123D Design and AutoCad. The 3D models will be converted to build files and printed using the lab 3D printers. Lecture/lab. Prerequisite: CADT 150.

CADT 180: 3D Studio I. (4) Introductory course in 3D modeling, rendering and animation. Lecture/lab. Prerequisite: CS 150 or permission of instructor.

CADT 185: Architectural Drafting. (4) An introductory architectural drafting course covering basic drafting skills and conventions.

CADT 191: Introduction to 3D Printing. (4) The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the current state of 3D printing technology. Students will learn about the cross-disciplinary nature of 3D printing as an accessible, cost-effective adn green prototyping and manufacturing solution. The course is taught in a lecture/lab format using two different 3D printers and related software. Lecture/lab. Prerequisite: CADT 150.

CADT 195: Introduction to Technical Drafting. (4) Includes basic drafting skills, geometric construction, multi-view projection and dimensioning.

CADT 255: Introduction to Architectural Modeling. (4) Students will use design software to create 3D models of buildings, generate floor plans and other working drawings, create a “walk through,” and generate construction estimates. This class can be used for elective credit in the CAD certificate and degree programs. Lecture/Lab. Prerequisite: IT 101 or equivalent computer literacy.

CADT 260: Intermediate Computer-Aided Drafting. (4) This course covers discipline, specific environment, and data input/export. Lecture/Lab. Prerequisite: CADT 150.

CADT 270: Advanced Computer-Aided Drafting. (4) Course in advanced CAD techniques, including macro programming and production drafting. Prerequisites: CADT 260.

CADT 293: Topics in CAD. (1-4)

CADT 294: 3D Printing Project. (4) This is the capstone course for the 3D Printing Certificate. CADT 294 is an independent study course for students with existing modeling and 3D printing skills. Students are required to log eight hours per week (two of the eight hours must be completed in the CAD lab). The 3D printing project(s) and project milestones are chosen in consultation with the instructor. Lecture/lab.Prerequisites: CADT 171 and CADT 191.

CADT 295: Practicum/Cooperative Education. (1-4) Students are placed in a business in order to gain on-the-job skills and knowledge. Prerequisite: approval of the instructor; enrolled in the last semester of their associate degree or certificate program.

Computer Science (CS)

CS 150L: Computing for Business Students. (3) Students will use personal computers in campus laboratories to learn to use a word processor, a spreadsheet, and a database management program. The course will also cover access to the World Wide Web and other topics of current importance to business students. Course cannot apply to major or minor in Computer Science. Prerequisite: MATH 120.

CS 151L: Computer Programming Fundamentals for Non-Majors. (3) An introduction to the art of computing. Not intended for Computer Science majors or minors. The objective of the course is an understanding of the relationship between computing and problem solving. Lecture: 3 hours, recitation: 1 hour.

CS 152L: Computer Programming Fundamental for Computer Science Majors. (3) An introduction to the art of computing. Intended for Computer Science majors or minors. The objective of the course is an understanding of the relationship between computing and problem solving. Lecture: 3 hours, recitation: 1 hour.

Construction Technology (CNST)

CNST 104: Required Introduction to the National Center for Construction Education and Research for Certification. (4) Topics studied include basic math, communications prints, methods, and ethics. Students demonstrate skills level through laboratory assignments.

CNST 204: Timber Framing. (4) Plan reading, elementary construction techniques, materials and construction documents; primary emphasis is on the current building code plan checking. Prerequisite: CNST 104.

CNST 293: Topics in Construction Technology. (3-6) This course of study provides a basic introduction to construction skills for all crafts. Topics include basic safety in the construction setting, an introduction to construction mathematics, introduction to blue-prints, effective use of hand and power tools, and basic rigging.

Digital Media Arts (DMA)

DMA 102: Digital Media Arts Foundations. (3) This course is designed to provide students with a fundamental working knowledge of the technical, aesthetic, and conceptual aspects of creating digital artwork using variety of tools in the Adobe Creative Suite.

DMA 120: Introduction to Television and Film Production. (4) This is a comprehensive course that introduces students to the basics in producing short films and documentaries. Students will learn hands on by using and experimenting with equipment.

DMA 125: Introduction to Post-Production Editing. (4) This is a comprehensive introduction to the basics of editing short films and documentaries. Students will work with post-production software like Final Cut X for editing.

DMA 130: Cinematography. (4) This course introduces students to the world of cinematography. Students will learn about different cameras and lighting, scene study, shooting and editing scenes, and casting – all the techniques that comprise the making of motion pictures. Prerequisites: DMA 120 and DMA 125.

DMA 135: Short Film Production. (4) Students will learn the basics of pre-production to include lighting, casting, and shooting and editing, as it applies to short film production. Prerequisites: DMA 120 and DMA 125.

DMA 140: Commercial Production. (4) Students will learn the basics of commercials to include script writing, breakdown, and shooting and editing, as it applies to commercial production. Prerequisites: DMA 120 and DMA 125.

DMA 145: Documentary Film Production. (4) Students will learn the basics of documentary films and genres to include scriptwriting, cameras and lighting, and shooting and editing, as it applies to documentary film production. Prerequisites: DMA 120 and DMA 125.

DMA 150: Television and Film On-Set Internship. (4) Students will work on set for a television or film production company getting hands-on experience in the field. Students are required to keep a daily production journal. Prerequisites: DMA 120 and DMA 125.

DMA 155: Co-op Feature Film Production. (4) Students will co-op with a production company working on feature films. Students are required to keep a daily production journal. Prerequisites: DMA 120 and DMA 125.

DMA 210: Blogging as a Tool. (3)This course is designed to provide students with a fundamental working knowledge of blogging. Students will investigate blogging and contribute their own content to the Web, enhancing their critical view of our online universe.

DMA 220: Social Media Marketing Tools. (3)This course will teach students how to create and maintain a social media presence for business. Students will learn to use social media and content marketing to grow a business and engage with customers.

DMA 270: Capstone: Portfolio-Practicum. (3) This course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to concentrate on a specific portfolio project. Students will develop a portfolio helpful for an entry-level position in digital media. This course should be taken in the final semester. Prerequisite: Instructor approval.

Early Childhood Multicultural Education (ECME)

ECME 101: Child Growth, Development and Learning. (3) This basic course in the growth, development, and learning of young children, prenatal through age eight, provides students with the foundation for becoming competent early childhood professionals and knowledge of how young children grow, develop and learn. Major theories of child development are integrated with all aspects of development, including biological-physical, social, cultural, emotional, cognitive, and language domains. The adult’s role in supporting each child’s growth, development and learning will be emphasized.

ECME 103: Health, Safety and Nutrition. (2) This course provides information related to standards and practices that promote children’s physical and mental well-being, sound nutritional practices, and maintenance of safe learning environments. It includes information for developing sound health and safety management procedures for the prevention of childhood illnesses and communicable diseases. The course examines the many nutritional factors that are important for children’s total development, healthy eating habits, physical activity, and rest. Students gain knowledge necessary for creating safe teaming environments for decreasing risk and preventing childhood injury.

ECME 111: Family and Community Collaboration I. (3) This course examines the involvement of families from diverse cultural and linguistic backgrounds in early childhood programs. Ways to establish collaborative relationships with parents and others involved with children in early childhood settings are discussed. Strategies for communicating with parents and guardians about their children and incorporating the families’ goals and desires for their children into the early childhood program will be included.

ECME 115: Guiding Young Children. (3) This course explores various theories of child guidance and the practical application of each. It provides developmentally appropriate methods for guiding children and effective strategies and suggestions for facilitating positive social interactions. Appropriate strategies for preventing and dealing with violence, aggression, anger, and stress will be included. Emphasis is placed on helping children become self- responsible, competent, independent, and cooperative learners.

ECME 117: Curriculum Development through Play - Birth through Age 4 (Pre-K). (3) This beginning curriculum course focuses on developmentally appropriate content in early childhood programs. It addresses content that is relevant for children birth through age eight and developmentally appropriate ways of integrating content into teaching and learning experiences. Information on adapting content areas to meet the needs of children with special needs and the development of IFSPs and IEPs are included. Curriculum development in all areas, including literacy, numeracy, the arts, health, science, social skills, and adaptive learning for children, birth through age eight, is emphasized. Co-requisite: ECME 117L. Prerequisite: ECME 101.

ECME 117L: Practicum for Curriculum Development through Play - Birth through Age 4 (Pre-K). (2) This course provides opportunities for students to apply knowledge gained from Curriculum Development and Implementation I and develop skills in planning Developmentally appropriate learning experiences for young children from birth through age eight, including young children with special needs. Learning experiences will cover all content areas, including literacy, math, science, social studies, health/wellness, the arts, and adaptive skills for children, birth through age eight. Co-requisite: ECME 117. Prerequisite: ECME 101.

ECME 202: Introduction to Reading and Literacy Development. (3) This course is designed to prepare early childhood professionals for promoting children’s emergent literacy and reading development. Through a developmental approach, the course addresses ways in which early childhood professionals can foster young children’s phonemic awareness, literacy problem solving skills, fluency, vocabulary, comprehension, and language development. This course provides the foundation for early childhood professionals to become knowledgeable about literacy development in young children. An integrated language arts perspective and an interdisciplinary approach as it address’s developing writing, reading, and oral language in the home and school contexts will be addressed. Instructional approaches and theory- and research-based strategies to support the emergent literacy and reading skills of native speakers and English language learners will be presented.

ECME 217: Curriculum Development - Age 3 (Pre-K) through Grade 3. (3) This basic course focuses on the learning environment and the implementation of curriculum in early childhood programs. Students will use their knowledge of content, developmentally appropriate practices, and language and culture to design and implement experiences and environments that promote optimal development and learning for children from birth through age 8, including children with special needs. Various curriculum models and teaching and learning strategies will be included. Co-requisite: ECME 217L. Prerequisite: ECME 101.

ECME 217L: Practicum for Curriculum Development - Age 3 (Pre-K) through Grade 3. (2) This course provides opportunities for students to apply knowledge gained from Curriculum Development and Implementation II and develop skills in planning learning environments and implementing curriculum in programs serving young children, birth through age eight, including those with special needs. Co-requisite: ECME 217. Prerequisite: ECME 101.

ECME 220: Assessment of Children and Evaluation of Programs I. (3) This basic course familiarizes students with a variety of culturally appropriate assessment methods and instruments, including systematic observation. The course addresses the development and use of formative and summative program evaluation to ensure comprehensive quality of the total environment for children, families, and the community. Students will develop skills for evaluating the assessment process and involving other teachers, professionals and families in the process.

ECME 230: Professionalism. (2) This course provides a broad-based orientation to the field of early care and education. Early childhood history, philosophy, ethics and advocacy are introduced. Basic principles of early childhood systems are explored. Multiple perspectives on early care and education are introduced. Professional responsibilities such as cultural responsiveness and reflective practice are examined.

Earth and Planetary Science (EPS)

EPS 101: How the Earth Works – An Introduction to Geology. (3) A fascinating tour of our active planet. Explore Earth’s materials (rocks and minerals), the continents’ motions and related origins of earthquakes, volcanoes, mountain building, oceans, landscapes, natural energy and economic resources, global warming, and other topics. Students are encouraged but not required to enroll in EPS 105L. Meets UNMCC – Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences; meets NMCC – Area III: Laboratory Science.

EPS 105L: Physical Geology Laboratory. (1) Minerals, rocks, and topographic and geologic maps; field trips. 2 hrs. lab. Pre or co-requisite: EPS 101. Meets UNMCC – Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences; meets NMCC – Area III: Laboratory Science.

EPS 110: Topics in the Earth Sciences. (1-3) Eight- to 16-week courses on selected topics relating directly to the human experience, e.g., volcanoes, extinctions, weather, earthquakes, New Mexico’s water, soils, nuclear hazards, geomagnetism, Albuquerque field geology and the geology of everyday life.

EPS 115: Geological Disasters. (3) Causes and effects of disastrous geological events, including earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, tsunamis, landslides, and floods.

EPS 201L: Earth History. (4) Origin and history of the earth, including age of the planet and dating of rocks, changing configurations of oceans and continents as a result of plate tectonics, records of climate change, history of formation and erosion of mountain chains, origins and evolution of life and causes of extinction. Required field trip and lab exercises permit understanding of how Earth’s history is interpreted from the geologic rock record. Prerequisite: EPS 101 or ENVS 101; pre or co‑requisite: EPS 105L or ENVS 102L. Meets UNMCC – Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences; meets NMCC – Area III: Laboratory Science.

EPS 250: Geology of New Mexico. (3) Survey of geologic features of New Mexico including structures, land forms, stratigraphy, fossils, geologic history and mineral resources. A course in elementary geology recommended.

Economics (ECON)

ECON 105: Introductory Macroeconomics. (3) Economics on a national scale: determination of national income, employment level, inflation, and impact of policies affecting money supply, interest rates and government programs. Current macroeconomic issues and problems. Suggested prerequisites: ENGL 101 and MATH 120. Meets UNMCC – Area 4: Social and Behavioral Sciences; meets NMCC– Area IV: Social/Behavioral Sciences.

ECON 106: Introductory Microeconomics. (3) Exploration of individual consumer behavior, production decisions by the firm, and supply and demand relationships in the marketplace. Examination of the international dimension of production and consumption courses. Suggested prerequisites: ENGL 101, MATH 120, and ECON 105. Meets UNMCC – Area 4: Social and Behavioral Sciences; meets NMCC– Area IV: Social/Behavioral Sciences.

Education (EDUC)

EDUC 124: Introduction to Computers for Educators. (1) An introduction to microcomputers, software, and telecommunications. Emphasis placed on educational applications of software and hardware.

EDUC 293: Topics in Education. (1-3) Various topics related to education from an interdisciplinary perspective. May be repeated for credit, no limit.

Emergency Medical Services (EMS)

EMS 106: Emergency Medical Responder. (4) A 60-hour course designed specifically for personnel who are first at the scene of an accident or emergency. This course offers a foundation for advanced EMS courses. Prior to entering the clinical setting in the final week of class, students must have completed the following requirements: American Heart Association Healthcare Provider CPR Certification; program health form signed by physician; caregiver background screening and finger printing ($73.30 fee); immunizations to include Measles-Mumps-Rubella (MMR), Varicella (chicken pox), Hepatitis B series, Diphtheria-Pertussis-Tetanus (DPT), adult Tetanus, and Influenza (flu shot); Tuberculosis exam (TB).  Additional requirements for EMS classes.

EMS 111: EMS Combination Refresher. (1) A 24-hour required course for EMT-First Responders, Basics, and Intermediates to maintain state and National Registry licensure that reviews current treatment in pre-hospital emergency patient care and updates the student in any changes to the New Mexico Scope of Practice for EMT’s. Student must have a current EMT License to take this course.

EMS 113: EMT-Basic. (6) This EMS certification level is the foundation level for all emergency medical responders. This course consists of 96 hours of didactic instruction and 80 hours of lab instruction, including individual instruction for a range of basic skills. Upon successful completion of the course, graduates will be eligible to sit for the National Registry EMT licensing examination. Corequisite: 142. Restriction: program permission. Prior to entering the clinical setting in the final week of class, students must have completed the following requirements: American Heart Association Healthcare Provider CPR Certification; program health form signed by physician; caregiver background screening and finger printing ($73.30 fee); immunizations to include Measles-Mumps-Rubella (MMR), Varicella (chicken pox), Hepatitis B series, Diphtheria-Pertussis-Tetanus (DPT), adult Tetanus, and Influenza (flu shot); Tuberculosis exam (TB).  Additional requirements for EMS classes.

EMS 120: Introduction to EMS System. (3) Covers the history of emergency medical services and the development of EMS systems and current trends and issues in EMS. Ideal for students considering a career in EMS. Available online.

EMS 142: EMT-Basic Lab. (2) Meets the EMT Basic national standard curriculum requirements and incorporates NM EMT –B scope of practice. Provides lab instruction to prepare the student to sit for the NM and National Registry testing. Co–requisite EMS 113. Restriction: program permission. Prior to entering the clinical setting in the final week of class, students must have completed the following requirements: American Heart Association Healthcare Provider CPR Certification; program health form signed by physician; caregiver background screening and finger printing ($73.30 fee); immunizations to include Measles-Mumps-Rubella (MMR), Varicella (chicken pox), Hepatitis B series, Diphtheria-Pertussis-Tetanus (DPT), adult Tetanus, and Influenza (flu shot); Tuberculosis exam (TB).  Additional requirements for EMS classes.

EMS 143: EMT- Intermediate Lab. (1) Meets New Mexico requirements for EMT-Intermediate skills training, including intravenous fluid administration and pharmacology. Prerequisite EMS 113 and EMS 142. Co-requisite: EMS 180, EMS 151 Restriction: program permission. Prior to entering the clinical setting in the final week of class, students must have completed the following requirements: American Heart Association Healthcare Provider CPR Certification; program health form signed by physician; caregiver background screening and finger printing ($73.30 fee); immunizations to include Measles-Mumps-Rubella (MMR), Varicella (chicken pox), Hepatitis B series, Diphtheria-Pertussis-Tetanus (DPT), adult Tetanus, and Influenza (flu shot); Tuberculosis exam (TB).  Additional requirements for EMS classes.

EMS 151: EMT-Intermediate Clinical and Field Experience. (2) Meets New Mexico requirements for EMT-Intermediate field and clinical training, including emergency department and pre-hospital experience. Prerequisite: EMS 113 and EMS 142. Co-requisite: EMS 180 and EMS 143 Restriction: program permission. Prior to entering the clinical setting in the final week of class, students must have completed the following requirements: American Heart Association Healthcare Provider CPR Certification; program health form signed by physician; caregiver background screening and finger printing ($73.30 fee); immunizations to include Measles-Mumps-Rubella (MMR), Varicella (chicken pox), Hepatitis B series, Diphtheria-Pertussis-Tetanus (DPT), adult Tetanus, and Influenza (flu shot); Tuberculosis exam (TB).  Additional requirements for EMS classes.

EMS 180: EMT-Intermediate. (3) Meets New Mexico requirements and incorporates EMT-Intermediate scope of practice, to include lecture and lab instruction, including intravenous fluid administration and pharmacology. This course prepares the student to sit for New Mexico and National Registry testing. Restriction: program permission. Prior to entering the clinical setting in the final week of class, students must have completed the following requirements: American Heart Association Healthcare Provider CPR Certification; program health form signed by physician; caregiver background screening and finger printing ($73.30 fee); immunizations to include Measles-Mumps-Rubella (MMR), Varicella (chicken pox), Hepatitis B series, Diphtheria-Pertussis-Tetanus (DPT), adult Tetanus, and Influenza (flu shot); Tuberculosis exam (TB).  Additional requirements for EMS classes.

EMS 193: Emergency Medicine Topics (1-3) Titles will vary.


Engineering (ENG)

ENG 116: Introduction to Engineering. (1) Description of the engineering profession, orientation to engineering education, introduction to the engineering design process. Does not count toward degree credit in the College of Arts and Sciences or in the School of Engineering. Two hours lecture and demonstrations.

ENG 120: Mathematics for Engineering Applications. (4) Provides an overview of basic engineering mathematics topics necessary for success in second-year engineering courses. Topics are presented in the context of engineering applications and reinforced through labs and examples from core engineering courses. Prerequisite: MATH 121.

ENG 195: Special Topics in Engineering. (1-6) Selected topics in engineering and/or computer science at the introductory level.

English (ENGL)

Developmental Writing Courses:

ENGL 099: Developmental English. (4) An intensive study of fundamental writing skills, focusing upon paragraph development and fluency; introduces essay writing and includes a skills laboratory. Grade option: RA, RB, RCR/RNC. Prerequisites/placement: Minimum writing ACCUPLACER score of <55, or verbal ACT score of 14.

ENGL 100: Writing Standard English. (4) Developmental writing course providing concentrated practice writing and revising basic essays, as well as intensive study of grammar, punctuation, and usage and includes a skills laboratory. Grade option: RA, RB, RCR/RNC. Prerequisites/placement: Successful completion of ENGL 099 (RA, RB, or RCR) or minimum writing ACCUPLACER score of 55-68, or verbal ACT score of 17. Co-requisite: UNIV 101.

Expository and Professional Writing Courses:


ENGL 110: Accelerated Composition. (3) Requires minimum ACT Verbal score of 19 for placement. Expository writing and reading. Concentrates on organizing and supporting ideas in writing. Meets UNMCC – Area 1: Writing and Speaking; meets NMCC – Area I Communications.

ENGL 111: Composition I. (3) For students with ACT Verbal score of <19; does not count toward Core Curriculum Writing and Speaking requirements, but does count as elective credit for graduation. This is the first term of a two-term “Stretch” sequence (with ENGL 112); the intention is that students remain with their cohort and their teacher over both courses in successive semesters.

ENGL 112: Composition II. (3) Students are placed in ENGL 112 after they have received a grade of “C” or higher in ENGL 111 in the previous term. Meets UNMCC – Area 1: Writing and Speaking; meets NMCC – Area I Communications.

ENGL 113: Enhanced Composition. (4) This “Studio” option covers the requirements and student learning outcomes of ENGL 110 with the addition of a 1-cr. writing lab. All 4 cr. generate undergraduate credit ; 3 of the 4 cr. meet core curriculum requirements. Meets UNMCC – Area 1: Writing and Speaking; meets NMCC – Area I Communications.

ENGL 119: Technical Communications. (3) Introductory study of written and verbal communications used in the technical professions with emphasis in the planning, execution, and editing of professional and technical documents and other communication media. This course is not a substitute for ENGL 219 and generally applies to particular associate degree programs or as an elective credit. Students are encouraged to speak with an advisor about the applicability of this course. Prerequisite: ENGL 110.

ENGL 120: Composition III. (3) Practice writing analytic and argumentative essays based on expository and literary readings. Some research required. Can serve as initial composition course for students with ACT Verbal score of 26-28; serves as second course in composition sequence for students who have earned a “C” or higher in ENGL 110, 112, or 113. Meets UNMCC – Area 1: Writing and Speaking; meets NMCC – Area I: Communications.

ENGL 219: Technical and Professional Writing. (3) Practice in writing and editing of workplace documents, including correspondence, reports, and proposals. Prerequisite: ENGL 110 or 112 or 113 (B or higher), ENGL 120 (C or higher), or verbal ACT score > 26, or verbal SAT score > 610. Meets UNMCC – Area 1: Writing and Speaking; meets NMCC – Area I: Communications.

ENGL 220: Expository Writing. (3 to a maximum of 6) An intermediate course with emphasis on rhetorical types, structure, and style. Prerequisite: ENGL 110 or 112 or 113 (B or higher), ENGL 120 (C or higher), or verbal ACT score > 26, or verbal SAT score > 610. Meets UNMCC – Area 1: Writing and Speaking; meets NMCC – Area I: Communications.

ENGL 224: Introduction to Creative Writing. (3) A beginning course in the writing of diction, poetry, and creative nonfiction. Emphasis on process over product. Introduces issues of craft, workshop vocabulary, strategies for revision, and the habit of reading as a writer. Prerequisite: ENGL 110 or 112 or 113.

ENGL 290: Introduction to Professional Writing. (3) A beginning course in the professional writing concentration. Study of technical writing, public information and public relations writing and freelance nonfiction writing. Prerequisite: ENGL 120.

ENGL 298: Workshop in Literature or Writing. (1-3, maximum of 6) Various topics in literature, language and writing.

Literature and Language Courses:

ENGL 107: Greek Mythology. (3) Introduction to mythology; primary readings in stories about the gods and heroes, usually including Homer, Hesiod, Homeric Hymns and Tragedies.

ENGL 150: The Study of Literature. (3) An introduction to the study and appreciation of literature for non-English majors. Shows how understanding writers’ techniques increases enjoyment of their work; relates these techniques to literary conventions; teaches recognition, analysis, discussion of important themes. Meets UNMCC – Area 5: Humanities; meets NMCC – Area V: Humanities and Fine Arts.

ENGL 211: Topics in Literature. (3 to a maximum of 6) Surveys a specific type or area in literature, e.g., the American Novel, the satiric novel, southern fiction, the western novel, American poetry, feminist literature, Chicano literature, Native American literature African-American literature, Medieval, and Viking literature. Primarily for non-majors. Prerequisite: ENGL 150.

ENGL 240: Traditional Grammar. (3) A study of the basic analysis of English sentences offered by traditional grammar. Presents the terminology and methods for identifying parts of speech, functional units of sentences, and basic sentence patterns. Suggested prerequisite: ENGL 100.

ENGL 248: Topics in Popular Medieval Literature and Studies. (3 to a maximum of 9) Reading and analysis of popular contemporary literature and film of the medieval period, including Tolkien’s works; mystery novels; fantasy; Viking language and saga.

ENGL 250: The Analysis of Literature. (3) First course required of all English majors. Concentrates on methods of literary analysis and critical thinking. Prerequisite: ENGL 120.

ENGL 264: Survey of Native Literatures and Rhetorics. (3) A general overview of the history and diversity of the literatures and rhetorics of Native peoples, including oral tradition, film, autobiography fiction, poetry, art, drama and ceremony. Focus is on American Indian texts.

ENGL 265: Introduction to Chicana/o Literature. (3) A survey of Chicana/o novels, short stories, essays, poetry, and drama, from nineteenth century to the present, with emphasis on major themes such as history, culture, identity, language, and region.

ENGL 281: African-American Literature I. (3) This course introduces students to the African-American classics of the slavery era. Daily experiences of the characters in these books become the basis for discussing race, class, gender, revolt, freedom, peace and humanity.

ENGL 287: Topics in Introductory Studies in Genre. (3 to 6) Introductory study in any one genre, including narrative, comedy, satire, tragedy, fiction, poetics, or stylistic analysis of nonfiction.

ENGL 292: World Literatures: Ancient World through the 16th Century. (3) Survey of key texts in world literature from the ancient world through the 16th century. Meets UNMCC – Area 1: Writing and Speaking; meets NMCC – Area I: Communications.

ENGL 293: World Literatures: 17th Century through the Present. (3) Survey of key texts in world literature from the 17th century through the present. Meets UNMCC – Area 1: Writing and Speaking; meets NMCC – Area I: Communications.

ENGL 294: Survey of Earlier English Literature. (3) From Old English to 1798. A study of the principal literary and intellectual movements and selected writers and literary works from Beowulf through Johnson.

ENGL 295: Survey of Later English Literature. (3) From 1798 to present. Study of principal literary and intellectual movements and selected writers and literary works.

ENGL 296: Earlier American Literature. (3) A general survey of American Literature to the mid-19th century.

ENGL 297: Later American Literature. (3) A general survey of American Literature from the mid-19th century to present.

Fine Arts (FA)

FA 229: Topics. (1-3 for a maximum of 12) Interdisciplinary topics in fine arts.

French (FREN)

FREN 101: Elementary French I. (3) Beginning French for students with no previous exposure to French. Meets UNMCC – Area 6: Foreign Language.

FREN 102: Elementary French II. (3) Beginning French for students who have completed FREN 101 or equivalent. Meets UNMCC – Area 6: Foreign Language.

FREN 103: Elementary French Conversation. (1) Supplementary course to FREN 101, 102, for students interested in additional practice in speaking. Grading option: CR/NC. Pre or co-requisite: FREN 101 or FREN 102.

FREN 108: Elementary French Reading. (1) Continuation and enrichment of elementary curriculum, conducted entirely in French.

FREN 175: Accelerated Elementary French. (6) Encompasses the work of FREN 101, 102. FREN 101-102 and FREN 175 may not both be counted for credit.

FREN 201: Intermediate French I. (3) Review of grammar and development of communication skills, conducted mostly in French. Meets UNMCC – Area 6: Foreign Language.

FREN 202: Intermediate French II. (3) Review of grammar and development of communication skills, introduction to reading of French literature, conducted entirely in French. Meets UNMCC – Area 6: Foreign Language.

FREN 203: Intermediate French Conversation. (3) Designed primarily to give qualified students of FREN 201, 202 extra practice in the oral use of the language. It is recommended that this course be taken concurrently with FREN 201 or FREN 202.


Game Design and Simulation (GAME)

GAME 101: Introduction to Game Development. (3) Introductory game development concepts and techniques. Topics common to all game development: history of modern games, player considerations, game elements, storytelling and narrative, character development, game play experience, levels, interface design, audio, strategy, and project management.

GAME 120: Game Testing. (3) Testing and debugging gaming and simulation applications in the Alpha and Beta stages of production. Product critiques and written documentation of testing and debugging processes. Assigned projects, readings, presentations, exams and group critiques will assist in preparing the student for further study in game development.

GAME 130: Digital Imaging Techniques. (3) This course provides students with a fundamental working knowledge of the technical, aesthetic, and conceptual aspects of digital imaging techniques, digital photography, and the Adobe Photoshop Creative Suite software to provide a foundation in game asset building, texturing and design. Lectures, demonstrations, group/online discussions, and other online content will introduce various issues associated with the digital media presented and accompanying technologies.

GAME 160: Game Engine Scripting. (3) This course focuses on game scripting programming languages with an emphasis on game concepts and simulations directly related to game engines, both commercial and open-source, although a focus will be on the Unity game engine C++ and JavaScript. Students will work in small teams to produce a 2D or 3D computer game, using the Unity Game Engine. Students will be expected to fill multiple roles in the production process and gain hands-on experience in the collaborative processes of game design, project management, programming, graphics and animation, and playtesting.

GAME 180: Game Programming. (3) The course focuses on game programming, using various languages, such as C++. Topics will include points and vectors, sound, and graphics. Lectures, demonstrations, discussions, and other content will introduce various issues of game programming.

GAME 150: Character Animation and Rigging. (3) Create computer games utilizing game development tools that require no programming including 2D graphics, 3D modeling, music and sound effects. Tasks include: game setup, development studio, manipulating graphic images, creating sounds/music, pictures and animation.

GAME 102: Introduction to Game Engines. (3) This course focuses on real-time programming, using event-driven game scripting languages in both commercial and open-source gaming engines but mainly focusing on the Unity Game Engine. Students participate in both individual, hands-on exercises, as well as game development teamwork to design and build functional games, using existing game engines, including discussions and recommendations for game engines to fit industry specifications. Prerequisites: GAME 101 and 150.

GAME 220: Environmental Modeling. (3) This course teaches students how to create full scale environments working within small production teams. Students will create full realistic and stylized environments in 3D Studio Max, covering the modeling and texturing required.

GAME 250: Character and Creature Modeling. (3) This course continues the focus on core methodologies for collaborative game development. The iterative development process will be enhanced through online communication strategies, version control and a rigorous review process. Independent online marketing strategies will be introduced and utilized for the final project.

GAME 260: Level Design. (3) This course introduces the tools and concepts used to create levels for games and simulations. The course focuses on level design: architecture theory, concepts of critical path and flow, balancing, play testing, and storytelling, utilizing toolsets from industry titles. Lectures, demonstrations, discussions, and other content will introduce various issues of game-level design.

GAME 270: 3D Modeling and Animation. (3) This course focuses on skill development covering the 3D computer graphics pipeline, using Autodesk Maya, 3DS Ma, and/or Blender and other software. Upon completion of this course, students will gain the foundation needed to create games and game assets.

GAME 275: 3D Lighting and Shading. (3) This course is a study of various global, scene and character lighting techniques, shading and shadowing, and atmospheres and reflections that bring computer-generated 3D scenes to life in the digital production process.

General Studies (GNST)

GNST 193: Topics. (1-3) General reading and class discussion in topical areas of interest requested by students or community entities.

Health Career Health Sciences (HCHS)

HCHS 111: Medical Terminology. (3) An introduction to terminology used in health careers. It will provide a basic knowledge of prefixes, suffixes, and root words used in describing anatomical parts of the human body as well as general terms relating to disease processes.

HCHS 113: Basic Body Structures and Functions. (4) An introductory course in anatomy and physiology for students from diverse backgrounds and varying levels of educational preparation. No prior knowledge of biology or chemistry is assumed.

HCHS 115: Pharmacology for Health Occupations. (3) An introduction to principles for drug classification, usage, contraindications, dosage, and computations.

HCHS125: Introduction to Pharmacology. (3) This course will present the basic therapeutic actions of various types of commonly used drugs. Emphasis will be placed on the classification of medications, therapeutic action, adverse reactions, routes of administration and calculation of drug dosages and solutions. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the UNM-V Nursing Program. Corequisites: NURS 110, NURS 115, BIOL 238.

Health Career Health Technology (HCHT)

 

HCHT 121: Health Technology I. (4) An introduction to health technology, with topics to include: the history and regulation of medical record documentation, public health initiatives, the structure and language of healthcare delivery, reimbursement and billing practices, electronic health records and coding, patient privacy and security, and certification processes in health technology.

HCHT 211: Basic ICD/CPT Coding. (4) Students will learn the coding nomenclature and coding conventions for the CPT, ICD-10-CM, and Level II (HCPCS) coding systems, and apply the coding conventions and guidelines to code patient diagnoses, outpatient services, and medical supplies and pharmaceuticals. A variety of payment systems are also presented, along with Medicare fraud and abuse information. Prerequisite: HCHS 111.

HCHT 213: Principles of Disease. (4) An introduction to human pathophysiology for non-nursing health professionals, with topics to include: cellular function, immunity, cancer, and human systems (gastrointestinal, hematologic, nervous, skeletal, reproductive, and cardiovascular). Prerequisites: HCHS 111, HCHS 113.

HCHT 215: Advanced OP Coding. (2) Topics related to medical coding will include: format of CPT and ICD, coding guidelines, descriptions and definitions of symbols, correct use of modifiers, accessing Encoder coding resources, and payment methodology. Prerequisite: HCHT 211.

HCHT 219: Advanced IP Coding (3) Practice assigning ICD-9, ICD-10, and ICD-10 PCS codes using inpatient diagnosis, procedures and reports, using the 3M encode. Prerequisite: HCHT 211.

HCHT 221: Medical-Legal and Quality Management. (4) This course explores the management of healthcare-related information by Health Information Management (HIM) departments in the United States. Prerequisite: HCHT 121.

HCHT 222: Health Technology II. (4) This course covers supervisory principles and electronic medical records, including collection, arrangement, presentation and verification of healthcare data. Also included are reimbursement methodologies, confidentiality rules and regulations, and uses of coded data. Prerequisite: HCHT 121.

HCHT 231: Computer Applications and Healthcare Statistics. (4) This course introduces the student to computer applications in the healthcare industry and methods used to control the security of information, with topics to include: the concepts and procedures used in the preparation of statistical reports, including vital statistics, census systems, rates and percentages. Prerequisites: HCHT 121, CS 150L, or permission of instructor.

HCHT 232: Reimbursement Methodologies. (3) This course presents information about insurance programs and federal healthcare legislation. It provides a basic knowledge of claims management, medical necessity and coding systems. Pre or co-requisite: HCHT 211.

HCHT 233: Professional Practicum Experience. (6) The student will receive hands-on experience in a Health Information Management setting under a Practicum Site Manager, who is trained in the specific areas of Health Information Technology in which the student will be gaining experience. Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of all HCHT program core courses.

Health Education (HED)

HED 164L: Standard First Aid. (1-3) Preparation in knowledge and skills to meet the needs in situations when basic first aid care is needed. Students eligible for Standard First Aid Certification and CPR Certificate. May be repeated for credit up to 3 credit hours.

HED 171: Personal Health Management. (3) Exploration of the major areas of health information pertinent to understanding how to achieve, maintain, and promote positive health. Topics covered include mental health, drugs, human sexuality, prevention and control of diseases, nutrition, consumer health, and ecology.

HED 209: Education for AIDS Prevention. (1) This course is designed to familiarize students about the HIV/AIDS epidemic with HIV/AIDS awareness including basic information, prevention, history, compassion, legal issues, testing and societal implications.

HED 212: Fundamentals of Human Sexuality. (3) Basic knowledge about human sexuality including anatomical, physiological, psycho-social, and ethical components. Reproduction, contraception, sexually transmitted disease, sexual health and sexual dysfunctions are among areas examined.

HED 247: Consumer Health. (1) Preparation in knowledge and skills related to consumers of health products and services.

HED 260: Foundations of Health Promotion. (3) For those considering becoming health majors or minors in school health or community health. Exploration of the basic philosophy and fundamental practices currently utilized in health education.

HED 293: Topics. (1-3) May be repeated for credit, no limit.

History (HIST)

HIST 101: Western Civilization to 1648. (3) Ancient times to 1648. Meets UNMCC – Area 5: Humanities; meets NMCC – Area V: Humanities and Fine Arts.

HIST 102: Western Civilization Post 1648. (3) 1648 to present. Meets UNMCC – Area 5: Humanities; meets NMCC – Area V: Humanities and Fine Arts.

HIST 161: History of the United States to 1877. (3) Survey of the economic, political, intellectual, and social development of the United States, including the place of the U.S. in world affairs from 1607 to 1877. Meets UNMCC – Area 5: Humanities; meets NMCC – Area V: Humanities and Fine Arts.

HIST 162: History of the United States Since 1877. (3) Survey of the economic, political, intellectual, and social development of the United States, including the place of the U.S. in world affairs from 1877 to the present. Meets UNMCC – Area 5: Humanities; meets NMCC – Area V: Humanities and Fine Arts.

HIST 181: History of Latin America. (3) An introduction to indigenous, African and Iberian backgrounds. Examines colonial societies through social economic and political institutions with attention to the contributions of Indians, Africans and Europeans to the creation of Latin America’s diverse societies. Meets UNMCC – Area 5: Humanities.

HIST 182: Modern Latin American History. (3) Surveys the nations of Latin America from their independence until the present. Emphasizes the process of nation-building, governance, socioeconomic integration and coping with modernization. Special attention given to the great leaders of Latin America.

HIST 201: The Medieval World. (3) Also offered as MDVL 201. A broad survey of the history, literature, and culture of the medieval period, from the fall of the Roman Empire to the eve of the Renaissance.

HIST 205: Roman Civilization. (3) Also offered as PHIL 205, ARTH 205. An interdisciplinary introduction to ancient Rome. Lectures on Roman literature, history, art, and philosophy.

HIST 220: Studies in History. (1-3) Will vary from instructor to instructor but will offer a review of particular historical issues designed for the non‑specialist. For content of particular courses, see Schedule of Classes and contact Department. May be repeated for credit without limit provided the topics vary. Suggested prerequisite: ENGL 110.

HIST 251: Traditional Eastern Civilizations. (3) The origin and development of the traditional societies and cultures of India, Southeast Asia, China, Japan and the Middle East.

HIST 252: Modern Eastern Civilizations. (3) The emergence of modern Asia from the impact of western colonialism and imperialism to nationalism, modernization and revolution.

HIST 260: History of New Mexico. (3) Introduction to New Mexico history from earliest human settlement to present day.

HIST 284: African-American History I. (3) This course examines major events and personalities that shaped the history of African-Americans in the United States.

HIST 285: African-American History II. (3) This course will explore each of the major historical events, Black leaders of those times and their influence on the social and political advancement of African-Americans from the Civil War to the present.

Information Technology (IT)

IT 101: Computer FUNdamentals. (1-3) This course is designed for students with little or no computer experience. The course will prepare the student to utilize computer hardware and software effectively and efficiently. The student is given the opportunity to learn to use electronic mail, explore the web, perform basic file management procedures (copy, rename, create subdirectories, etc.), and edit, format, and print simple documents. The student will also have an opportunity to learn basic information of computer systems to include the functions of various hardware components, the importance of software programs, how information is processed, and the social and ethical implications of the computer generation. Suggested pre or co-requisite: OBT 105.

IT 110: Introduction to Publications and Presentations. (1) This course provides the student with basic information about the graphics arts career and corresponding skills. The student is given the opportunity to learn various terminology associated with desktop publishing and presentation graphics as well as the basic skills to produce simple yet effective publications and electronic slide presentations. Suggested prerequisite: IT 101 or prior experience with computers.

IT 116: Fundamentals of Graphic Design. (3) This course is designed to provide students with a fundamental working  knowledge of computer-generated graphics and two-dimensional media work, preparing the student for further study in graphic and media arts.

IT 121: Electronic Spreadsheets. (3) Introduction to concepts and applications of electronic spreadsheets. Suggested pre or co-requisite: CS 150 with grade of C or better.

IT 122: Introduction to Database Management Systems. (3) Students will study theory of database management systems (DBMS) and will write generic and reusable programs using DBMS software. Suggested prerequisite: CS 150 with grade of C or better.

IT 125: Microcomputer Operating Systems. (3) Introductory concepts in microcomputer operating systems. Acquaints students with practical aspects of microcomputer operating systems including file management systems, utilities, and computer peripherals. Suggested prerequisite: CS 150 with grade of C or better.

IT 131: Introduction to Hardware Installation. (3) The purpose of this course is to prepare students to take and pass the CompTIA national certification test. Students will learn function, structure, operations, file management, and memory management. Students will also practice proper safety procedures, scheduled preventative maintenance, and installation of computer components. In addition, students will configure, diagnose, and troubleshoot stand-alone computers. Finally, students will learn and apply industry accepted customer service skills. Prerequisite: IT 125.

IT 140: Technical Customer Service. (3) The purpose of the course is to expose students to a wide range of customer concerns regarding the software and hardware problems. Students will identify the problem with the computer and/or software, then explain it in layman’s terms and recommend corrective actions. This will be accomplished by simulating real-life hardware/software problems. A portion of the class will address customer expectations, handling irate customers, and proactive problem control. Pre or co-requisites: IT 205, IT 222, IT 230.

IT 193: Topics I. (1-4) May be repeated for credit provided content is not the same.

IT 205: Web Design Methodology. (3) Students will create and manage Web sites using various programming languages, multimedia and CSS standards. This course focuses on theory, design and Web construction, along with information architecture concepts, Web project management, scenario development and performance evaluations.

IT 222: Database Management Systems. (3) This course is a continuation of IT 122. Students will write more complex generic and reusable DBMS programs to build finished, turnkey applications. Prerequisite: IT 122.

IT 230: Computer Networking. (4) Students will learn the fundamentals of network technology, technical concepts of network environments, identify the basic characteristics for local and wide area networks, list and describe the layers of the OSI networking model, list and identify the use of common network devices, describe the procedure for installing and configuring network adapters, list common network protocols, identify the best network protocol, describe the physical characteristics of a LAN, identify inter-network connectivity hardware by sight, define the roles of clients, servers, and peers on a network, list the most common network operating systems, identify potential network bottlenecks, and list fault tolerance procedures. Prerequisites: IT 125 and IT 131.

IT 262: Scripting for Network Defense. (3) Scripting programming for security purposes. Students build on prior programming, operating systems, and security knowledge to develop, code, use, and debug new and existing scripts.

IT 270: Graphics and Animation. (3) This course introduces the student to the concepts, tools, and techniques of microcomputer-based, two-dimensional graphics and animation. Students use microcomputer painting software to create visual effects and still images, and they use animation software to produce the illusion of movement. Students are taught design fundamentals, as well as the essentials of color theory, and they explore the differences between pigment color and light color.

IT 293: Topics II. (1-4) May be repeated for credit provided content is not the same.

IT 295: Practicum/Cooperative Education. (3) Students are placed in a business in order to gain on-the-job skills and knowledge. Prerequisite: approval of the instructor; enrolled in the last semester of the associate degree or certificate program.

Linguistics (LING)

LING 101: Introduction to the Study of Language. (3) Also offered as ANTH 110. Broad overview of the nature of language: language structure, biology of language, language learning, language and thought, bilingualism, social and regional variation, and educational implications. Intended to fulfill breadth requirements in any college. Meets UNMCC– Area 4: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

LING 295: Special Topics in Current Language Issues. (3) Special topics motivated by expertise of instructor and interest of students. Topics may include language and gender, language and politics, animal communication, language and aging, and languages of the world. May be repeated for credit, since topics vary by term.

Manufacturing (MFGT)

MFGT 102: Manufacturing Operator. (3) In this introduction to manufacturing course, the following topics will be covered: work environment; reading and understanding procedures; control systems; safety; basic math skills; reading and creating process maps; Lean Manufacturing techniques; and Total Productive Maintenance.

Mathematics and Statistics (MATH, STAT)

Note: For courses requiring a grade of C or higher in a prerequisite course, a grade of C- is not sufficient to satisfy the prerequisites for mathematics and statistics courses. A co-requisite course must be taken either before or with the course requiring it.

Developmental Mathematics Courses:

MATH 011: Pre-algebra Part I. (1-2 credits) This course includes the first half of a prealgebra course including whole numbers, fractions, decimals, ratio and proportions, and percent. Prerequisites/placement: Minimum ACCUPLACER score of 35-56 (Arithmetic), or math ACT score of 14.

MATH 012: Pre-algebra Part II. (1-2 credits) This is the second half of a prealgebra course and covers measurement and geometry, real numbers, introduction to algebra and basic equation solving, and applications. Prerequisite: MATH 011.

MATH 021: Introduction to Algebra Part I. (1 to 2 credits) This course includes the first half of a beginning algebra course including a review of basic arithmetic, real numbers, integer exponents, linear inequalities, and an introduction to application problems. Prerequisites/placement: Successful completion of MATH 099 or MATH 012 or minimum ACCUPLACER score of 57-101 (Arithmetic), or math ACT score of 16. Co-requisite: MATH 193: Critical Thinking for Math.

MATH 022: Introduction to Algebra Part II. (1 to 2 credits) This course includes the second half of a beginning algebra course including a review of the Cartesian coordinate system, graphing linear equations in two variables, properties of exponents, polynomials and an introduction to factoring. Prerequisite: MATH 021.

MATH 099: Pre-Algebra. (4) A pre-college mathematics course. Emphasis is placed on basic operations, fractions, decimals, percents, ratios, and introductory algebra and includes a skills laboratory. Prerequisites/placement: Minimum ACCUPLACER score of 35-56 (Arithmetic), or math ACT score of 14.

MATH 100: Introduction to Algebra. (4) Topics covered include linear equations, polynomials, factoring, formulas, graphing, and applications problems and include a skills laboratory. Prerequisites/placement: Successful completion of MATH 099 or minimum ACCUPLACER score of 57-101 (Arithmetic), or math ACT score of 16. Co-requisite: MATH 193: Critical Thinking for Math.

Study Session Courses:

MATH 106: Problems in Intermediate Algebra. (1) A study session for MATH 120 students with an emphasis on problem solving. Grade option: CR/NC. Suggested co-requisite: MATH 101/102/103 or MATH 120.

MATH 107: Problems in College Algebra. (1) A study session for MATH 121 students with an emphasis on problem solving. Grade option: CR/NC. Suggested co-requisite: MATH 121.

MATH 110: Problems in Elements of Calculus I. (1) Study session for Math 180 with an emphasis on problem solving. Grade option: CR/NC. Suggested co-requisite: MATH 180.


College-Level Mathematics Courses:

MATH 101: Intermediate Algebra Part 1. (1) This course includes equations and inequalities, applications and problem solving with linear equations, linear functions and the graph of a line, percent, perimeters, areas of simple geometric shapes. Prerequisite: Successful completion of MATH 022 or MATH 100, or minimum ACCUPLACER score of 102-120 (Arithmetic) or ACCUPLACER score of 41-65 (Elementary Algebra), or math ACT ≥ 19, or math SAT ≥ 450.

MATH 102: Intermediate Algebra Part 2. (1) This course includes quadratic equations, properties of exponents and scientific notation, simplifying polynomial expressions, factoring and introduction to functions. Prerequisite: Math 101.

MATH 103: Intermediate Algebra Part 3. (1) This course includes radical expressions and equations, rational expressions and equations, the exponential and logarithm functions. Prerequisite: Math 102.

MATH 111: Mathematics for Elementary and Middle School Teachers I. (3) Course offers an in-depth look at the representations of rational numbers, including base-ten and decimal numbers, integers, fractions, and arithmetic operations on these sets. Problem solving is emphasized throughout Prerequisites/placement: Successful completion of MATH 102 or MATH 100 or MATH 120 or MATH 121 or MATH 123 or MATH 150 or MATH 162 or MATH 180 or STAT 145 or ISM 100 or ACT ≥ 19 or SAT ≥ 450 or ACCUPLACER score of 102-120 (Arithmetic) or 41-65 (Elementary Algebra).

MATH 112: Mathematics for Elementary and Middle School Teachers II. (3) This course develops basic geometric concepts including rigid transformations and congruence; dilations and similarity; length, area and volume; systems of measurement and unit conversions; connections to coordinate geometry. Problem solving is emphasized throughout. Prerequisite: Successful completion of MATH 111.


MATH 115: Technical Mathematics. (3) Intended for students in applied trade technologies. Topics include a review of basic arithmetic, elementary algebra, applied geometry, measuring instruments, and formulas. Prerequisite/placement: Successful completion of MATH 022 or MATH 100 or ACCUPLACER score of 102-120 (Arithmetic) or 41-65 (Elementary Algebra).

MATH 120: Intermediate Algebra. (3) Preparation for MATH 121, 129 and STAT 145. Covers linear equations and inequalities, polynomials, factoring, exponents, radicals, fractional expressions and equations, quadratic equations, perimeters, areas of simple geometric shapes, and logarithms. Emphasis on problem solving skills. Prerequisites/placement: Successful completion of MATH 022 or MATH 100 or minimum ACCUPLACER score of 102-120 (Arithmetic) or ACCUPLACER score of 41-65 (Elementary Algebra), or math ACT ≥ 19, or math SAT ≥ 450.  Acceptable as credit toward graduation in some programs, but not acceptable to satisfy the UNMCC or NMCC requirement in Mathematics

MATH 121: College Algebra.(3) Preparation for MATH 150 and 180. The study of equations, functions and graphs, especially linear and quadratic functions. Introduction to polynomial, rational, exponential and logarithmic functions. Applications involving simple geometric objects. Emphasizes algebraic problem solving skills. Prerequisites/placement: Successful completion of MATH 119 or MATH 120 or MATH 103 or minimum ACCUPLACER score of 104-120 (Elementary Algebra) or ACCUPLACER score of 37-68 (College-Level Math), or math ACT ≥ 22, or math SAT ≥ 510.Meets UNMCC – Area 2: Mathematics; meets NMCC – Area II: Mathematics.

MATH 123: Trigonometry. (3) Definition of the trigonometric functions, radian and degree measure, graphs, basic trigonometric identities, inverse trigonometric functions, complex numbers, polar coordinates and graphs, vectors in 2 dimensions. May be taken concurrently with MATH 150. Prerequisites/placement: Successful completion of Math 121 or minimum ACCUPLACER score 69-99 (College-Level Math), or math ACT score ≥ 25, or math SAT score ≥ 570.

MATH 129: A Survey of Mathematics. (3) An introduction to some of the great ideas of mathematics, including logic, systems of numbers, sequences and series, geometry and probability. Emphasizes general problem-solving skills. Prerequisites/placement: Successful completion of MATH 119 or MATH 102 or MATH 120 or MATH 121 or MATH 123 or MATH 150 or MATH 162 or MATH 163 or MATH 180 or MATH 181 or MATH 264, or minimum ACCUPLACER score of 66-103 (Elementary Algebra) or 37-68 (College-Level Math), or math ACT score ≥22, or math SAT score ≥510. Meets UNMCC – Area 2: Mathematics; meets NMCC – Area II: Mathematics.


MATH 130: Exploring Topics and Careers in Mathematics. (2) This introduction course will prepare students planning to major in Mathematics or Statistics. The course will emphasize career options, concentrations, and research and job opportunities. Activities are designed to engage students in their chosen field. Prerequisites/placement: Successful completion of MATH 123 and MATH 150, or ACCUPLACER score of 100-120 (College-Level Math) or ACT ≥ 32 or SAT≥700.

MATH 150: Pre-Calculus Mathematics.(3) In-depth study of polynomial, rational, exponential and logarithmic functions and their graphs. Includes the fundamental theorem of algebra, systems of equations, conic sections, parametric equations and applications in geometry. Exploration of the graphing calculator. May be taken concurrently with MATH 123. Prerequisites/placement: Successful completion of Math 121 or minimum ACCUPLACER score of 69-99 (College-Level Math), or math ACT score ≥25, or math SAT score ≥570. Meets UNMCC – Area 2: Mathematics; meets NMCC – Area II: Mathematics.

MATH 162: Calculus I.(4) Limits. Continuity. Derivative: definition, rules, geometric and rate-of-change interpretations, applications to graphing, linearization and optimization. Integral: definition, fundamental theorem of calculus, substitution, applications to areas, volumes, work, average. Prerequisites/placement: Successful completion of MATH 123 and MATH 150, or ACCUPLACER score of 100-120 (College-Level Math) or ACT ≥ 32 or SAT≥700.Meets UNMCC – Area 2: Mathematics; meets NMCC – Area II: Mathematics.

MATH 163: Calculus II.(4) Transcendental functions, techniques of integration, numerical integration, improper integrals, sequences and series, Taylor series with applications, complex variables, differential equations. Credit not allowed for both MATH 163 and MATH 181. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Math 162.Meets UNMCC – Area 2: Mathematics; meets NMCC – Area II: Mathematics.

MATH 180: Elements of Calculus I.(3) Limits of functions and continuity, intuitive concepts and basic properties; derivative as rate of change, basic differentiation techniques; application of differential calculus to graphing and minima-maxima problems; exponential and logarithmic functions with applications. Credit not allowed for both MATH 162 and MATH 180. Prerequisites/placement: Successful completion of Math 121 or MATH 150 or minimum ACCUPLACER score of 69-99 (College-Level Math), or math ACT score of 26, or math SAT score of 600. Meets UNMCC – Area 2: Mathematics; meets NMCC – Area II: Mathematics.

MATH 181: Elements of Calculus II.(3) Includes the definite integral, multivariate calculus, simple differential equations, basic review of trigonometry and its relation to calculus. Credit not allowed for both MATH 163 and MATH 181. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Math 180. Meets UNMCC – Area 2: Mathematics; meets NMCC – Area II: Mathematics.

MATH 193: Topics in Mathematics. (1-3)Topics in mathematics including, but not limited to, tools and techniques designed to improve attitudes and performance in math class, and calculator usage. Generally, the co-requisite is MATH 021, MATH 022 or MATH 100. Consult with your instructor for details.

MATH 215: Mathematics for Elementary and Middle School Teachers III.(3) Algebra from the viewpoint of the elementary curriculum with emphasis on proportional and linear relationships. Also included: topics from probability and statistics with connections to other topics in elementary curriculum. Problem solving is emphasized throughout. Prerequisite: Successful completion of MATH 111.Meets UNMCC – Area 2: Mathematics.

MATH 264: Calculus III. (4) Vector operations, vector representation of planes and curves, functions of several variables, partial derivatives, gradient, tangent planes, optimization, multiple integrals in Cartesian cylindrical and spherical coordinates, vector fields, line integrals and Green’s theorem. Prerequisite: Successful completion of MATH 163.

STAT 145: An Introduction to Statistics. (3) Techniques for the visual presentation of numerical data, descriptive statistics, introduction to probability and basic probability models used in statistics, introduction to sampling and statistical inference, illustrated by examples from a variety of fields. Prerequisites/placement: Successful completion of MATH 119 or MATH 102 or MATH 120 or MATH 121 or MATH 123 or MATH 150 or MATH 162 or MATH 163 or MATH 180 or MATH 181 or MATH 264, or minimum ACCUPLACER score of 37-68 (College-Level Math) or 66-103 (Elementary Algebra), or ACT score ≥22, or SAT score ≥510. Meets UNMCC – Area 2: Mathematics.


Media Arts (MA)

MA 110: Introduction to Mass Communication. (3) Also offered as CJ 110. Study of the development of the mass media with emphasis on television in the areas of programming, policy, regulations, economics, and technology. Examination of the social, cultural, and political impact of the mass media on contemporary society.

MA 111: Technical Introduction to Video Production. (3) For the student who has no practical knowledge of video technology. Students learn about the camera and lens, sound recording, lighting, editing, and other elements of production. Special fee required.

MA 210: Introduction to Film Studies. (3) Analysis of film as a unique art, and a survey of main trends in film history. Screenings and critical study of major films.

MA 212: Beyond Hollywood. (3) An introduction to marginalized cinemas with screenings of major works.

MA 216: Topics in Video Making. (3-6) This course strengthens students’ skills in video technology, while helping them write, direct, and edit video projects that begin to reflect a personal, artistic vision. Special fee required. Prerequisite: MA 111.

Mechanical Engineering (ME)

ME 217: Energy, Environment and Society. (3) A look at the social, ethical, and environmental impacts of energy use in the contemporary world and throughout history. A survey of renewable energy and conservation and their impact on environmental and social systems.

Music (MUS)

MUS 139: Music Appreciation. (3) Designed to expand the student’s ability to listen actively to Western classical art music; a survey of the various genres, including chamber music, symphonic and vocal repertoire. Includes live guest performances. Attendance at several on-campus concerts required. No musical background necessary. Meets UNMCC – Area 7: Fine Arts; meets NMCC– Area V: Humanities and Fine Arts.

MUS 143: University Chorus. (1) Large mixed chorus. Open to all university students; no audition required. May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 8 hours credit. 

Natural Science (NTSC)

NTSC 261L: Physical Science. (4) For pre-service K-8 teachers only. A broad, interdisciplinary introduction to the science of geology, chemistry, physics and astronomy, with emphasis on the sciences processes, inquiry and the integration of technology. The course is activity-based, utilizing a problems-and-issues based approach; various teaching methods are modeled and practiced by students; some field trips may be required. Meets UNMCC – Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences.

NTSC 262L: Life Science. (4) For pre-service K‑8 teachers only. An activity-based study of science topics including botany, cell biology, genetics, microbiology, and zoology with emphasis on science processes, inquiry and integration of technology. Various teaching methods are modeled, and practiced by students; some field trips may be required. Meets UNMCC – Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences.

NTSC 263L: Environmental Science. (4) For pre-service K‑8 teachers only. An activity‑based interdisciplinary study of major issues in environmental science with emphasis on science process, scientific investigations, and field-based activities, and the integration of technology. Course topics include current issues on population, healthy ecosystems, and natural resources. Various teaching methods are modeled, and practiced by students. Meets UNMCC – Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences.

Nursing (NURS)

Note: NURS 110, 115, 130, 131, 230, 232, 234, 235, 242L, 243, and 245 are restricted to students in the Associate Degree in Nursing (ADN) program. Only students enrolled in the ADN program will be allowed to enroll in these courses. In addition, CPR certification is required to participate in clinical rotation of nursing courses. You must sign up for a CPR class if you are not currently certified. The CPR class must be a Health Care Providers course. Background checks are required for clinical rotations, be expected to have a background check done per the Patient Care Act. The fee may cost up to $130. Immunizations are required for all health care providers. Documentation will be required in order to go into clinical rotation. MMR, Hepatitis B vaccine, TB screening, and Varicella are all required. Students must get a physical clearing them to lift 50 lbs. in order to go into clinical rotation. Make your doctor appointments early if you are signing up for this course. Finally, Needle Stick insurance coverage is mandatory for students enrolled in the ADN program. All UNM students who are at risk for body fluid and blood-borne pathogen exposure, and coverage is for academic-related exposures only. Cost for coverage is $30.00 per semester/per student, and is subject to change. Coverage will start the 1st day of the semester and end the day before the 1st day of the next semester. Students will be required to obtain this insurance before any academic-related training will take place.

NURS 110: Professional Development. (1) Introduces the Nursing student to broad concepts of critical self-examination, self-evaluation and self-management as a precursor to personal accountability and responsibility necessary for effective Nursing leadership and management. Emphasis on entry into the roles of the profession. Prerequisite: Admission into UNM-V Nursing Program. Corequisites: HCHS 125, NURS 115, BIOL 238.

NURS 115: Nursing Fundamentals. (8) Introduces concepts and skills foundational to Associate Degree nursing. Emphasis is placed on use of best practice and nursing process to provide care for individual older adults with chronic health needs in long term care. Prerequisite: Admission into UNM-V Nursing Program. Corequisites: HCHS 125, NURS 110, BIOL 238.

NURS 130: Medical-Surgical Nursing I. (5) Introduction to medical-surgical nursing. Students will apply the nursing process in the care of an acute and/or chronically ill adult client in the acute care setting. Clinical application will take place in a variety of healthcare environments. Prerequisites: HCHS 125, NURS 110, NURS 115. Corequisites: NURS 131, PSYC 220, ENGL 120.

NURS 131: Mental Health Nursing. (4) Focuses on application of the nursing process to care for individuals experiencing normal and abnormal psychological responses to life stressors. Students will care for one client in acute and community settings. Prerequisites: HCHS 125, NURS 110, NURS 115. Corequisites: NURS 130, PSYC 220, ENGL 120.

NURS 230: Women’s Health Nursing. (4) Focuses on the application of the nursing process to care for female clients, neonates, and families, before, during and after the birth process. Students will care for clients in a variety of inpatient and community settings. Prerequisites: HCHS 125, NURS 110, NURS 115, NURS 130, NURS 131, PSYC 220. Corequisites: NURS 232, NURS 234.

NURS 232: Pediatric Nursing. (4) Focuses on application of the nursing process to care for the child and family. Students will care for clients in a variety of inpatient and community settings. Prerequisites: HCHS 125, NURS 110, NURS 115, NURS 130, NURS 131, PSYC 220. Corequisites: NURS 230, NURS 234.

NURS 234: Medical-Surgical Nursing II. (5) Focuses on application of the nursing process to care for one or more adult clients and families with acute and chronic multisystem health problems. Clinical learning takes place in acute and community-based facilities and simulations labs. Prerequisites: HCHS 125, NURS 110, NURS 115, NURS 130, NURS 131, PSYC 220. Corequisites: NURS 230, NURS 232.

NURS 238: Pharmacology in Nursing and the Health Professions. (3) Introduction to pharmacologic principles, application of these principles to major classes of drugs, common drugs and their use in the clinical setting. Pre or co-requisite: NURS 239 or NURS 240.

NURS 239: Pathophysiology I. (3) An introduction to human pathophysiology. The course focuses on forming a basic understanding of pathophysiology for nursing students. Prerequisites: BIOL 237 & 247L and BIOL 239L.

NURS 240: Pathophysiology II. (3) This course is a continuation of Pathophysiology I. The course focuses on forming a basic understanding of Pathophysiology for nursing students. Prerequisites: NURS 239 and BIOL 238 & 248L.

NURS 242L: Nursing Practicum. (2) This clinical course provides assessment of the student’s Nursing knowledge, skills, and abilities in preparation for graduation, while the student works with a preceptor RN in the acute, long-term, or community setting. Prerequisites: HCHS 125, NURS 110, NURS 115, NURS 130, NURS 131, NURS 230, NURS 232, NURS 234. Corequisites: NURS 243, NURS 245.

NURS 243: Medical Surgical Nursing III. (9) The nursing process is applied in the care of the adult client with complex acute, life-threatening, multi-system health problems. Clinical learning will take place in outpatient and inpatient acute care settings and simulation labs. Prerequisites: HCHS 125, NURS 110, NURS 115, NURS 130, NURS 131, NURS 230, NURS 232, NURS 234. Corequisites: NURS 242, NURS 245.

NURS 245: Professional Seminar. (1) This capstone course explores the theoretical application of Nursing practice to develop expertise in management and leadership roles. Emphasis is on professional role development. Prerequisites: HCHS 125, NURS 110, NURS 115, NURS 130, NURS 131, NURS 230, NURS 232, NURS 234. Corequisites: NURS 242, NURS 243.

Nursing Assistant (CNA)

CNA 101L: Nursing Assistant. (8) This course prepares students to provide patient care in a home, health care center, or hospital under the supervision of a professional health care provider (RN). Prepares students for the NM Nurse Aide Competency Evaluation (Prometric) exam. 128 total clock hours; 96 hours lecture/skills lab; 32 hours clinical. Prerequisites: Satisfactory score on placement tests for writing, reading, and mathematics or completion of ENGL 100 and MATH 099 with a grade of “CR”. Prior to entering the clinical setting in the final week of class, students must have completed the following requirements: American Heart Association Healthcare Provider CPR Certification; program health form signed by physician; caregiver background screening and finger printing ($73.30 fee); immunizations to include Measles-Mumps-Rubella (MMR), Varicella (chicken pox), Hepatitis B series, Diphtheria-Pertussis-Tetanus (DPT), adult Tetanus, and Influenza (flu shot); Tuberculosis exam (TB).  A UNM Certificate is awarded upon successful completion of this course.

Nutrition (NUTR)

NUTR 120: Nutrition for Health. (3) General concepts of nutrition applied to food choices that support health. Cultural, psychological and economic implications of food choices.

NUTR 244: Human Nutrition. (3) This course provides an overview of all the nutrients including functions in the body and food sources. Dietary guidelines intended to promote long term health are stressed. Prerequisite: BIOL 123 or BIOL 201 and CHEM 111L or CHEM 121 and CHEM 123L.

Office and Business Technology (OBT)

OBT 105: Basic Keyboarding. (1) Designed for students who have no keyboarding background or for students who want to improve/increase keyboarding skills. Students will learn the proper techniques for using the alpha‑numeric keyboard using tutorial software on microcomputers. Not recommended for Office and Business Technology majors.

OBT 110: Business Language Skills. (3) Focuses on basic business language skills—spelling, capitalization, business terminology, dictionary usage, hyphenation, sentence punctuation, and applications to business writing.

OBT 111: Keyboarding and Word Processing I. (3) Keyboarding is emphasized to develop speed and accuracy using the computer and current word processing software. Students will focus on creating, saving and retrieving, editing and formatting the following types of documents: business letters, memorandums, and manuscripts.

OBT 112: Keyboarding and Word Processing II. (3) Students will learn to format business letters, business forms, manuscripts and tables with accuracy and speed using the computer and current word processing software. Resumes, application letters, itineraries, labels and news releases will be introduced. Speed goal: 45 wpm minimum. Prerequisite: OBT 111.

OBT 205: Business Math Applications. (3) This course shows the student how to operate an electronic calculator through the “touch” method. Business problems in banking, payroll, merchandising, interest, compound interest, finance charges, amortization, depreciation, working capital ratios, and securities purchases are covered. Prerequisite: MATH 100.

OBT 219: Legal Terminology/Transcription. (3) This course emphasizes legal terminology, and preparation and transcription of legal documents on a microcomputer. It is individualized and self-paced through the use of tapes. Prerequisites: OBT 112 (with minimum typing speed of 45 wpm) and ENGL 100 or equivalent.

OBT 221: Medical Transcription. (3) Students will learn to transcribe medical reports on a microcomputer. This course is individualized and self-paced through the use of tapes. Prerequisites: OBT 112 (with minimum typing speed of 45 wpm) and ENGL 100.

OBT 235: Records Management. (3) A management course pertaining to a vital office function—the storage and control of records. Students will acquire knowledge and gain experience in using traditional and computerized storage systems.

OBT 257: Administrative Procedures. (3) This course will provide students with an understanding of the role of administrative support personnel: employment skills, office health and safety issues, organization and time management, records management, information and communications, meeting and travel planning, reprographics, and critical thinking skills. Prerequisite: OBT 112.

OBT 260: Desktop Publishing and Presentation. (3) Students get hands-on training in desktop publishing and presentation graphics software as they are taught to produce flyers, newsletters, brochures, and professional presentations. Prerequisite: OBT 112 or approval of the instructor.

OBT 263: Preparation for Microsoft Word Certification. (3) Students will refine their word processing skills and apply them to more advanced operations (e.g., math functions, sorting, merging and graphics) which will help them prepare for Microsoft Word Certification. Certification testing is not provided; students wishing to take the exam will need to make their own arrangements. Prerequisite: OBT 112 or approval of the instructor.

OBT 265: Business Communications. (3) Students will prepare business correspondence, deliver oral presentations, and be introduced to grant writing. Correct and forceful English will be emphasized. Students will develop sensitivity in communicating with a diverse workforce. Prerequisite: OBT 110.

OBT 293: Topics in OBT. (3) Focuses on topics of special interest in Office and Business Technology. May be repeated for credit up to 9 credit hours.

OBT 295: Practicum/Cooperative Education. (1-3) Students are placed in an office-related work situation to gain skills and knowledge on the job. Prerequisite: approval of the instructor.

Personal Care Attendant (PCA)

PCA 101L: Personal Care Attendant. (5) (Home Health Aide) Students prepare to work as a Personal Care Attendants in home healthcare, as independent contractors/self-employment, or to provide care for a relative. Course includes lectures, group learning, video instruction, workbook exercises, instructor demonstrations, hands-on skills practice and exams. Skills Lab: 64 hours; job shadowing: 16 hours in a home healthcare or assisted living facility. Prerequisites: Satisfactory score on placement tests for writing, reading, and mathematics or completion of ENGL 100 and MATH 099 with a grade of “CR”. Prior to entering the clinical setting in the final week of class, students must have completed the following requirements: American Heart Association Healthcare Provider CPR Certification; program health form signed by physician; caregiver background screening and finger printing ($73.30 fee); immunizations to include Measles-Mumps-Rubella (MMR), Varicella (chicken pox), Hepatitis B series, Diphtheria-Pertussis-Tetanus (DPT), adult Tetanus, and Influenza (flu shot); Tuberculosis exam (TB).  A UNM Certificate is awarded upon successful completion of this course.

Philosophy (PHIL)

PHIL 101: Introduction to Philosophical Problems. (3) Philosophical issues and methodology illustrated through selected problems concerning values, knowledge, reality; and in social, political, and religious philosophy. Meets UNMCC – Area 5: Humanities; meets NMCC– Area V: Humanities and Fine Arts.

PHIL 102: Current Moral Problems. (3) Ethical issues arising in contemporary society; sexual morality, preferential treatment, racism, punishment, war, and world food distribution.

PHIL 108: Introduction to Asian Philosophies. (3) Philosophical issues and methodology illustrated in relation to South and East Asian thought: Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism, and Confucianism.

PHIL 111: Humanities I. (3) Comparative introduction to the development of human civilizations, emphasizing philosophic thought, religious practice and artistic expression. Meets UNM Core Curriculum-5: Humanities. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Core Curriculum Area V: Humanities and Fine Arts.

PHIL 156: Reasoning and Critical Thinking. (3) The purpose of this course is to help students learn how to analyze, critique, and construct arguments in context, in other words, how to read and write argumentative essays. Meets NMCC – Area V: Humanities and Fine Arts.

PHIL 201: Greek Thought. (3) An introductory survey of early and classical Greek philosophy, literature, and history. Figures: Presocratics, Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle; Homer and Sophocles; Herodotus and Thucydides. Meets UNMCC – Area 5: Humanities; meets NMCC– Area V: Humanities and Fine Arts.

PHIL 202: From Descartes to Kant. (3) An historical study of philosophical trends and controversies that characterize the development of early modern philosophy. This survey will cover the philosophies of Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, and Kant. Meets UNMCC – Area 5: Humanities; meets NMCC– Area V: Humanities and Fine Arts.

PHIL 204: Greek Civilization. (3) Also offered as CLST 204, HIST 204, ARTH 204. An Interdisciplinary introduction to the ancient world as the foundation of modern civilization. Lectures on classical art, history, literature and philosophy.

PHIL 205: Roman Civilization. (3) Also offered as HIST 205, ARTH 205. An interdisciplinary introduction to ancient Rome. Lectures on Roman literature, history, art and philosophy.

PHIL 245: Professional Ethics. (3) Examination of social and ethical problems associated with the business, engineering, medical and legal professions. Meets NMCC – Area V: Humanities and Fine Arts.

Phlebotomy Technician (PBT)

Note:Needle Stick insurance coverage is mandatory for PBT 101L/102L. All UNM students may be at risk for body fluid and blood-borne pathogen exposure, and coverage is for academic-related exposures only. Cost for coverage is $30.00 per semester/per student, and is subject to change. Coverage will start the first day of the semester and end the day before the first day of the next semester. Students will be required to obtain this insurance before any academic-related training will take place.

PBT 101L: Phlebotomy Technician. (8) This course prepares students to become a Phlebotomy Technician. Training includes anatomy, safety, blood-drawing techniques, specimen preparation, equipment maintenance, and associated clerical, customer service and basic work skills. Prerequisites: Satisfactory score on placement tests for writing, reading, and mathematics or completion of ENGL 100 and MATH 099 with a grade of “CR”. Co-requisite: PBT 102L. Prior to entering the clinical setting in the final week of class, students must have completed the following requirements: American Heart Association Healthcare Provider CPR Certification; program health form signed by physician; caregiver background screening and finger printing ($73.30 fee); immunizations to include Measles-Mumps-Rubella (MMR), Varicella (chicken pox), Hepatitis B series, Diphtheria-Pertussis-Tetanus (DPT), adult Tetanus, and Influenza (flu shot); Tuberculosis exam (TB). Phlebotomy students must also purchase Needle-Stick Insurance ($30 fee). A UNM Certificate is awarded upon successful completion of this course.

PBT 102L: Phlebotomy Technician Clinical. (4) Clinical apprenticeship program for PBT 101L. Successful completion required for credit in PBT 101L. Clinical: 120 hours total.


Physical Education (PENP, PEP)

PENP 113: Aikido. (1) Instruction and practice of the basic skills and techniques of Aikido

PENP 114: Weight Training and Physical Conditioning. (1) Individual training programs for development of general strength, tone, endurance, and weight control.

PENP 115: Intermediate Weight Training. (1) Instruction in advanced weight-lifting principles and techniques as well as fitness related topics.

PENP120: Nia Dance Fitness. (1) Instruction and practice in the basic movements in Nia, a fitness program designed to increase participant's strength, endurance and balance.

PENP121: Beginning Belly Dance. (1) Instruction in the basic moving steps and rhythms of the oriental dance

PENP122: Intermediate Belly Dance. (1) Instruction on the isolation and slow movements of Middle Eastern dance, including use of the veil and improvisation

PENP 124: Ballroom Dance. (1) Instruction in the basic movements of social dances such as the fox trot, waltz, lindy, rhumba, tango, and cha-cha.

PENP 125: Intermediate Ballroom Dance. (1) Instruction dependent upon experience of students in basic movements of all segments of ballroom dance.

PENP 128: Beginning Country Western Dance. (1) Instruction in the basic movements of the waltz, two-step, swing and polka.

PENP 129: Intermediate Country Western Dance. (1) Instruction dependent upon experience of students in basic movements of all segments of Country Western dance.

PENP 130-131: T'ai Chi Ch'uan. (1) Instruction and practice in techniques to enhance body awareness, reduces stress, improve balance and increase strength.

PENP 132: Beginning Tae Kwan Do. (1) Instruction in the basic skills, blocks, strikes and kicks of Tae Kwan Do.

PENP 133: Intermediate Tae Kwan Do. (1) Advanced instruction in the basic skills, blocks, strikes and kicks of Tae Kwan Do

PENP 134: Beginning Kung Fu. (1) Instruction in the basic skills, blocks, strikes and kicks of Kung Fu.

PENP 135: Intermediate Kung Fu. (1) Advanced instruction in the basic skills, blocks, strikes and kicks of Kung Fu

PENP 136: Personal Defense. (1) Instruction in the basic skills needed to defend one’s self against assault.

PENP 138-139: Karate. (1) Instruction in the basic skills, blocks, strikes, and kicks of Japanese karate.

PENP 140: Beginning Golf. (1) Instruction in basic skills, equipment, rules, etiquette, and shot-making.

PENP 141: Intermediate Golf. (1) Instruction emphasizes actual play.

PENP 143: Beginning Tennis. (1) Instruction in basic skills and rules of tennis.

PENP 144: Intermediate Tennis. (1) Instruction dependent upon skills of students in basic fundamentals. Perfection of strokes.

PENP 146: Bowling. (1) Special fees. Instruction and practice in the basic skills of bowling.

PENP 148: Archery. (1) Instruction in the basic skills and knowledge of range archery.

PENP 155-156: Pilates. (1) Instruction in movements that increase balance, core fitness and cardiorespiratory endurance.

PENP 158: Aerobic Dance I. (1) Instruction in continuous movement using basic dance steps for improved cardio‑respiratory endurance.

PENP 159: Aerobic Dance II. (1) Instruction in a longer aerobic workout using more advanced dance steps for improved cardio‑respiratory endurance.

PENP 161-162: Jogging Fitness. (1) Individualized running programs for improved cardio‑respiratory endurance.

PENP 165: Yoga. (1) Introduction to five areas of yoga which are particularly significant to the Western World.

PENP 166: Intermediate Yoga. (1) Instruction in more advanced techniques of Yoga emphasizing the physical aspects of Hatha Yoga.

PENP 177-178: Fundamentals of Stretching and Relaxation Techniques. (1) Instruction and practice of various techniques to enhance flexibility and reduce stress.

PENP 180-181: Feldenkrais: Awareness Through Movement. (1) A class to develop and experience a deeper awareness of a person's body and its capabilities.

PENP 188: Modified Physical Education. (1) An activity class designed to meet the individual needs of students who require various modifications for exercise.

PENP 193: Topics. (1-2) May be repeated for credit, no limit. New activities offered on an exploratory basis.

PENP 293: Topics. (1-3) May be repeated for credit, no limit.

Physics (PHYC)

PHYC 151: General Physics. (3) Mechanics, sound, heat, fluid, waves. The sequence (PHYC 151, 151L, 152, 152L) is required of pre-medical, pre-dental, and pre-optometry students. Only PHYC 151 and 152 are required of pharmacy students. Prerequisite: Successful completion of MATH 150 or MATH 153 or MATH 162 or MATH 180 or ACCUPLACER score of 100-120 (College-Level Math) or ACT score ≥28, or SAT score ≥660. Meets UNMCC – Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences; meets NMCC– Area III: Laboratory Science.

PHYC 151L: General Physics Laboratory. (1) Mechanics, sound, heat. Lab: 3 hours. Pre or co-requisite: PHYS 151. Meets UNMCC – Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences; meets NMCC– Area III: Laboratory Science.

PHYC 152: General Physics. (3) Electricity, magnetism, optics. Prerequisite: PHYS 151.

Meets UNMCC – Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences; meets NMCC– Area III: Laboratory Science.

PHYC 152L: General Physics Laboratory. (1) Electricity, magnetism, optics. Lab: 3 hours. Pre or co-requisite: PHYS 152. Meets UNMCC – Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences; meets NMCC– Area III: Laboratory Science.

PHYC 160: General Physics. (3) Mechanics, sound. Pre or co-requisite: MATH 162. Meets UNMCC – Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences; meets NMCC– Area III: Laboratory Science.

PHYC 160L: General Physics Laboratory. (1) Mechanics, sound. Pre or co-requisite: PHYC 160. Meets UNMCC – Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences; meets NMCC– Area III: Laboratory Science.

PHYC 161: General Physics. (3) Heat, electricity, magnetism. Prerequisite: PHYC 160. Pre or co-requisite: MATH 163. Meets UNMCC – Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences; meets NMCC– Area III: Laboratory Science.

PHYC 161L: General Physics Laboratory. (1) Electricity and magnetism. Pre or co-requisite: PHYC 161. Meets UNMCC – Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences; meets NMCC– Area III: Laboratory Science.

Political Science (POLS)

POLS 110: The Political World. (3) An introduction to politics, with emphasis on the ways people can understand their own political systems and those of others. Students who have already had courses in political science may not count POLS 110 toward a major at UNM. Meets UNMCC – Area 4: Social and Behavioral Sciences; meets NMCC– Area IV: Social/Behavioral Sciences.

POLS 200: American Politics. (3) Survey of American politics, including political behavior of the American electorate, the theory of democracy, the structure and function of American political institutions, and contemporary issues. Meets UNMCC – Area 4: Social and Behavioral Sciences; meets NMCC– Area IV: Social/Behavioral Sciences.

POLS 220: Comparative Politics (3). Designed to give students the ability to understand and evaluate political regimes by focusing on the political history, socioeconomic structure and contemporary political institutions and behavior. Includes consideration of European and developing systems. Meets UNMCC – Area 4: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

POLS 240: International Politics. (3) Also offered as PCST 240. Analyzes significant factors in world politics, including nationalism, national interest, ideology, international conflict and collaboration, balance of power, deterrence, international law and international organization. Meets UNMCC – Area 4: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

POLS 260: Political Ideas. (3) Introduces many of the enduring political issues in descriptive, analytical and normative terms. Will include discussion of both classical and contemporary political ideas and ideologies.

POLS 270: Public Policy and Administration. (3) Introduces public policy and bureaucracy, including decision-making and implementation.

POLS 280: Introduction to Political Analysis. (3) Discovery of causal patterns in political behavior, evaluation of effectiveness of political reforms and campaign techniques, analysis of the logic of scientific research and related topics. No knowledge of statistics, computers or research methods assumed.

Psychology (PSY)

PSY 105: General Psychology. (3) Overview of the major content areas in psychology. Topics to be covered include learning, cognition, perception, motivation, biological systems, social and abnormal psychology, development, personality, and approaches to psychotherapy. Meets UNMCC – Area 4: Social and Behavioral Sciences; meets NMCC– Area IV: Social/Behavioral Sciences.

PSY 211: Applied Psychology. (3) Topics in applications to everyday life, such as personnel selection, consumer psychology, and environmental problems.

PSY 220: Developmental Psychology. (3) Overview of the physical, perceptual, motor, cognitive, emotional, and social development of children from infancy through adolescence. Prerequisite: PSY 105.

PSY 231: Psychology of Human Sexuality. (3) Also offered as WMST 231. Exploration of the physiological, cultural, social and individual factors that influence sexual behavior, sex roles, and sexual identity. Prerequisite: PSY 105.

PSY 240: Brain and Behavior. (3) A general survey of the biological foundations of behavior. Emphasis is on the central nervous system. Prerequisite: PSY 105, or BIOL 110, or BIOL 123.

PSY 265: Cognitive Psychology. (3) Study of the cognitive processes involved in the encoding, storage, retrieval and use of knowledge, including attention, memory, comprehension, categorization, reasoning, problem-solving, and language. Prerequisite: PSY 105.

PSY 271: Social Psychology. (3) Study of social influence: perception of oneself and others, attitudes, conformity, attraction, altruism, aggression, groups. Prerequisite: PSY 105. Suggested prerequisite: ENGL 110.

PSY 280: Health Psychology. (3) This introduction to Health Psychology covers the role of stress in illness, coping with chronic illness, stress, and pain, and the role of health behavior in health and disease. Prerequisite: PSY 105.

Religious Studies (RELG)

RELG 107: Living World Religions. (3) Introduction to major living world religions, such as Buddhism, Christianity, Hinduism, Islam, and Judaism. Suggested prerequisite: ENGL 110. Meets UNMCC – Area5: Humanities.


Sign (SIGN)

SIGN 201: Introduction to Signed Language. (3) Overview of signed language studies and related issues. Introduction to American Sign Language (ASL); signed communication systems most frequently used by deaf and hard of hearing individuals; the study of fingerspelling. Meets UNMCC – Area 6: Foreign Language.

Sociology (SOC)

SOC 101: Introduction to Sociology. (3) Basic concepts, topics, and theories of contemporary sociology. Prerequisite for more advanced courses in sociology. Meets UNMCC – Area 4: Social and Behavioral Sciences; meets NMCC– Area IV: Social/Behavioral Sciences.

SOC 205: Crime, Public Policy and the Criminal Justice System. (3) The study of crime, the criminal justice system and crime-related public policy. Discussion of key criminology concepts. Measurement of crime and delinquency, its distribution in society, victimization, public opinion, the criminal justice system, crime control strategies and policies. Prerequisite: SOC 101.

SOC 211: Social Problems. (3) Description and analysis of major social problems facing American society. Foci may include: poverty, homelessness, alcohol and drug problems, race and ethnic relations, aging and mental illness. Prerequisite: SOC 101.

SOC 213: Deviance. (3) Survey of major forms of norm-violating behavior in American society, such as drug and alcohol abuse, mental illness, criminal behavior, and sexual deviance. Discussion of sociological explanations of the causes of, and attempts to address these behaviors. Prerequisite: SOC 101.

SOC 216: The Dynamics of Prejudice. (3) The study of prejudice and discrimination, including their historical and contemporary sources and prospects for reduction, with applications to American institutions. Prerequisite: SOC 101.

SOC 221: Global Issues. (3) The global context of patterns of development in nation-states with an emphasis on industrialized countries. Selected topics of social, economic, and cultural change. Inequality, war, reform and revolution in global perspective.

SOC 230: Society and Personality. (3) The social psychology of personalities, relationships, small groups, and organizations. Prerequisite: SOC 101.


Spanish (SPAN)

SPAN 101: Elementary Spanish. (3) Beginning Spanish for students with no previous exposure to Spanish. Development of all four language skills, with emphasis on listening and speaking. Meets UNMCC – Area 6: Foreign Language.

SPAN 102: Elementary Spanish.(3) Beginning Spanish for students who have completed SPAN 101 or equivalent. Continued development of four skills with emphasis on listening and speaking. Meets UNMCC – Area 6: Foreign Language.

SPAN 103-104: Elementary Spanish Conversation. (1) Supplementary course to SPAN 101-102 for students interested in additional practice in speaking. Grade option: CR/NC. Pre or co-requisite: SPAN 101 or SPAN 102.

SPAN 111: Elementary SHL I. (3) Beginning Spanish for students who grew up in a Spanish-speaking environment. Will build upon the language base which the students already possess. Development of all language skills: reading, writing, listening and speaking.

SPAN 112: Elementary SHLII. (3) Beginning Spanish for heritage language students who have completed SPAN 111 or equivalent. Continued development of the four skills with an emphasis on reading and writing, vocabulary building and review of grammar.

Span 201: Intermediate Spanish I.(3) Intermediate Spanish for students who have completed SPAN 102 or equivalent. Review of grammar and further development of all four skills. Meets UNMCC – Area 6: Foreign Language.

Span 202: Intermediate Spanish II.(3) Spanish for students who have completed SPAN 201 or equivalent. Continued development of all four skills with emphasis upon reading. Meets UNMCC – Area 6: Foreign Language.

SPAN 203: Spanish Conversation. (3) For students who have completed or are currently enrolled in SPAN 201or SPAN 202. Small classes designed to increase skills in speaking Spanish. Not for native speakers. Pre- or co-requisite: SPAN 201, SPAN 202, SPAN 211.

SPAN 211: Intermediate SHL I. (3) Intermediate Spanish for heritage language students who have completed SPAN 102 or equivalent. Review of grammar and continued development of the four skills with an emphasis on literacy and speaking.

SPAN 212: Intermediate SHL II. (3) Intermediate Spanish for heritage language students who have completed SPAN 201 or equivalent. Further development of all four skills, with an emphasis on reading authentic materials, on practice writing needs and communicating with other native speakers.


Statistics (STAT) (see Mathematics and Statistics)

 

Sustainable Building (SUST)

SUST 120: Introduction to Green Building. (3) This course is an introduction to green building, principles, materials and methods of construction as they apply to sustainable residential construction. It provides the decision making framework for students to learn how homes can be built to be more energy efficient, healthy and comfortable.

SUST 150: Renewable Energy in Buildings. (3) This course is an introduction to solar and other renewable energy options for new and existing construction. Topics include: photovoltaic arrays, passive and active solar space heating and water heating, and wind energy. Students will use computer generated three-dimensional models to evaluate building performance and explore design options.

SUST 230: Computer Assisted Sustainable Design (BIM). (3) This course explores sustainable design using BIM (building information modeling) and specialized energy analysis software. Students will learn core concepts of sustainability in building design, including systems, and materials.

SUST 295: Green Building Capstone Project/Internship. (3) Students are assigned opportunities to expand their knowledge and skills by applying sustainable practices and policy. Students will work directly on sustainable projects and research in a workplace setting.

Theatre Arts (THEA)

THEA 105: Theatre Appreciation. (3) For majors and non-majors. Study of the various elements of the practice of theatre: acting, directing, design, production, playwriting. Issues of spectatorship and criticism also addressed. Required attendance at a number of performances. Meets UNMCC – Area 7: Fine Arts; meets NMCC – Area V: Humanities and Fine Arts.

University Studies (UNIV)

UNIV 101: Freshman Interest Group Seminar. (1-3 to a maximum of 3) Designed to accelerate successful transition to university life. Grade option: A, B, CR/NC.

UNIV 175: Experiential Learning Seminar. (1-3 to a maximum of 3) Experiential learning involves collaborative, reflective investigation of real-world issues from a variety of personal, social and disciplinary perspective. Extensive off-campus participation may be required. UNIV 175 may be linked with a co-requisite course. 

UNIV 201: Topics in Career Exploration. (1-3 to a maximum of 6) Both general and discipline-specific sections offered. Students will explore their goals, passions, and skills, and the steps and tools related to career decision making (general seminar). In the discipline-specific sections, students will explore specific career options.

Welding (WLDT)

WLDT 101: Blue Print Reading. (4) An introductory course on welding blue print reading and related theory. Students will demonstrate competency by satisfactory completion of instruction modules and American Welding Society Standards. Course combines lecture and laboratory.

WLDT 105: Arc Welding I. (4) This course will introduce the student to the process of electrode manipulation, position welding and the use of different welding machines.

WLDT 107: Advanced Arc Welding. (4) Students will learn V-groove welds and how to set up welding equipment for making open V-groove welds. The course provides procedures for making flat, horizontal, vertical and overhead open V-groove welds.

WLDT 108: Oxyacetylene Welding. (4) This course will introduce the student to the gas welding process. The student will learn to handle and use the acetylene gas form of welding.

WLDT 130: Pipe Welding. (4)This course utilizes advanced Arc and oxyacetylene welding skills and techniques on ferrous pipe in a rotating and/or a fixed position. Emphasis is placed on the open groove pipe joint. The course will include alignment techniques, oxyacetylene cutting of pipe, pre-heat interpass temperatures, and mechanical preparation of the joints.

WLDT 141: M.I.G. and T.I.G. Welding. (4) This course begins with a brief review of pipe welding and groove welds on plate in all positions and covers stainless steel, cupro nickel alloys, hard facing processes, gas metal arc welding or M.I.G, and gas tungsten arc welding or T.I.G.

WLDT 201: Welding Metallurgy Math and Communication. (4) Students will study metallurgy, math and communication skills for welding technology.

Women's Studies (WMST)

WMST 200: Introduction to Women Studies (3) This interdisciplinary course explores intersectional influences of gender, race, class, sexuality, and other factors of identity in regional, national, and international contexts; the critical historical study of feminist activity and Women’s Studies in the U.S.